Profile for Rosemary Amey > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Rosemary Amey
Top Reviewer Ranking: 554,889
Helpful Votes: 5

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Amazon Communities.

Reviews Written by
Rosemary Amey (Toronto)

Page: 1 | 2
pixel
Bettas
Bettas
by Robert J. Ph.D. Goldstein
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 9.89
32 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't live up to subtitle "A Complete Pet Owner's Manual", July 14 2004
This review is from: Bettas (Paperback)
Despite the subtitle, this book is very technical and has little information which is of use for the average person with a pet betta. There is a lot of information on breeding and the different types of bettas, which might be useful for a breeder. As a pet "owner", I found it unhelpful. You can find more information about keeping bettas as pets for free online.

I'm Okay, You're a Brat!: Setting the Priorities Straight and Freeing You From the Guilt and Mad Myths of Parenthood
I'm Okay, You're a Brat!: Setting the Priorities Straight and Freeing You From the Guilt and Mad Myths of Parenthood
by Susan Jeffers
Edition: Hardcover
18 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Lots of problems, not enough solutions, Dec 17 2000
I checked this book out because I was curious as to how Susan Jeffers, whose book _End_the_Struggle,_Dance_with_Life_, I loved, could write something with such a horrible-sounding title.
I was surprised to find that I could appreciate a lot of what _Brat_ has to say. She explains why it is inevitable that parents will be incredibly stressed out, not through any fault of their own but just because children have so many needs which their parents have to meet regardless of how busy or exhausted they are. This is a message I could have used in the first six months of motherhood, when I felt guilty about secretly wanting to get away from my baby for a month or so, despite loving him with all my heart.
_Brat_ goes into extensive detail about the challenges of childrearing, and for that reason I would recommend it to people who are trying to make the parenting decision--especially those who have no compelling desire to have kids but are being pressured by others. However, this focus on the difficulties of parenting also can be pretty depressing to those of us who are parents. After being reminded of the inevitable losses that being a parent brings, I was starting to feel resentful of my 2-year-old son--though fortunately I was soon able to quash that by focussing on the good things that motherhood has brought. I wish that Jeffers had given much more information to help those of us who already are parents cope, rather than just a brief "survival guide" which appears as an addendum at the end of the book. While I agree with some of her suggestions (get fathers more involved, get a life outside of raising your kids), I find that her suggestion that employment outside the home is better than stay-at-home motherhood is overly simplistic. If, as she alleges, SAHM's can't get out because it is too difficult to gather up the baby's stuff and get baby dressed, how is it possible for her to do so to cart the baby off to daycare on the way to work? If caring for one child is too exhausting to cope with for any period of time (over an hour she suggests at one point!) why does she not have even more concern about daycare employees coping with a number of children all day? If SAHM's have "no" time for their own interests or even to wash their hair, how will adding the responsibilities of full-time employment help? I was also concerned that she sometimes claims that some children are inherently "bad". This kind of thinking does not lend itself to finding constructive solutions to problems with a child's behaviour. And what does it do to a child to be written off like this by hir own parent? For coping with the challenges of parenting, I have found the following books helpful: Parenting the Fussy Baby and High Needs Child by Martha and William Sears (check out chapter on avoiding burnout), Raising Your Spirited Child by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka, and All Mothers Work by Cindy Ramming (on the pros and cons of being a SAHM, and how to cope with SAHMhood if that is what's right for you).

The Song of the Zubble-Wump
The Song of the Zubble-Wump
by Tom Brannon
Edition: Paperback
17 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Rip-off, Nov. 17 2000
Although Amazon has listed Dr. Seuss as one of the authors of this book, he is not!
Instead, the other authors/illustrator are attempting to boost their sales by stealing some of Seuss's characters--the Cat in the Hat, Horton the elephant, and the Grinch.
This plodding, predictable story totally lacks the wild plot twists and off-the-wall craziness of true Seuss. The trouble-making Cat in the Hat is transformed into a bland voice of authority lecturing about the importance of sharing. Evidently the authors haven't read "How the Grinch Stole Christmas", or they would know that the Grinch reformed at the end and is not the incorrigible villain he is depicted as in this book. Even the artwork is not a convincing imitation of Seuss, lacking the bold black ink strokes and wild details. The new characters in the book, Megan Mullally and her grandfather, look like Muppets rather than Seuss characters.
Get a *real* Dr. Seuss book.

Mother Goose: A Collection of Nursery Rhymes
Mother Goose: A Collection of Nursery Rhymes
by Brian Wildsmith
Edition: Paperback
23 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, Nov. 12 2000
I am a great fan of Brian Wildsmith's art, however, this book is not at all up to his usual standards (though my 2 year old son likes it). Furthermore, the nursery rhymes include a number of macabre and violent ones, which I would rather not subject my son to.

Web Design in a Nutshell
Web Design in a Nutshell
by Jennifer Niederst
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 43.95
40 used & new from CDN$ 0.47

5.0 out of 5 stars The best!, Nov. 12 2000
Niederst has created an invaluable resourse for web professionals. She goes beyond the usual summaries of commands to get into issues such as browser differences, accessibility for the disabled webuser, and future web technologies. My copy is only a few months old, but already it is dogeared from active use--in particular, the comprehensive appendices of HTML tags and attributes, and the table of special character codes.
Her writing is clear and concise, with a welcome touch of humour. However, this is a book for people who are already comfortable with computers--a newbie would likely be intimidated. Personally, though, I prefered this book to the scores of cutesy dumbed-down books for the masses for this very reason.

Look Back, Moss
Look Back, Moss
by Betty Levin
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, Nov. 10 2000
This review is from: Look Back, Moss (Hardcover)
Betty Levin, who raises and trains sheepdogs, clearly had a specific agenda in mind when she wrote this book--to defend the use of sheepdogs, and smear animal rights activists. Her expertise on sheepdogs allows her to create a rich and complex character in Moss, the sheepdog of the title. However, the "animal rights" characters are poorly developed, inconsistent, and unbelieveable. Her contempt for animal rights activists is obvious: in this book, they are uniformly stupid, impulsive, hypocritical (most of them eat meat!), and unethical (compelling a child to engage in illegal activities). At one point, Levin suggests that Jody's mother was "brainwashed" by the other activists.
I have never heard of any animal rights activists being concerned about the plight of sheepdogs, but after reading this book, I wonder if maybe there is cause for concern. Why is Levin so hostile and defensive? Her unrealistic depiction of animal activists leads me to wonder if Moss's yearning to return to his work as a sheepdog is pure invention as well.

Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz
Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz
by Lucette Matalon Lagnado
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.44
28 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, moving, Nov. 8 2000
A fascinating account of Nazi "scientist" and "doctor" Josef Mengele, who cheerfully "selected" thousands of Jews, Gypsies, and other people for quick death (gas chambers) or slow death (by exhaustion, malnutrition, and the filthy conditions) at Auschwitz, and who performed pseudoscientific "experiments" on many human prisoners, especially twin children. Delving into Mengele's past, as an endearing child known as "Beppo", and his life after the war (unrepetant to the end) the authors have created a fascinating portrait of this complex, twisted man. Juxtaposed with Mengele's story are the stories of the few twins who survived the experiments at Auschwitz. I found it especially poignant to see the contrast between Mengele's relatively easy life after the war--he used his family's wealth to start a successful business in South America and hobnobbed with other members of the South American Nazi "elite", and the lives of the twins after the war--most of them lost their families and lived in severe poverty, as well as being haunted throughout their lives by the horrors they suffered at Auschwitz. Highly recommended.

Marrying Again: The Art of Attracting a New Man and Winning His Heart
Marrying Again: The Art of Attracting a New Man and Winning His Heart
by Teddi Sanford
Edition: Hardcover
8 used & new from CDN$ 2.23

1.0 out of 5 stars Marrying again... and again... and again..., July 26 2000
I read this book looking for specific advice on dealing with the unique challenges of remarriage--how to keep ghosts from the previous marriage(s) from intruding, meeting the needs of children from your previous marriage as well as those of the new husbands, building a strong step-family. Instead _Marrying_Again_ gives the same old superficial manipulative advice you would find in a magazine article--figure out what he wants and then become that person. They take it to ridiculous extremes--suggesting hiding your kids if he doesn't like kids (what happens if you marry him! ) or, if you don't have kids and he likes them, *borrowing* someone else's kids! It reminded me of a Lynda Barry cartoon spoof on relationship advice--"Giving up your 'real' personality is a small price to pay for a relationship with an actual man!"
Later on in the book, they discuss changing the man to suit your needs as well, demeaningly describing incompatible men as "fixer-uppers" and detailing how to manipulate them into giving up their real personalities too.
If you follow this advice, you could very well be remarried very soon. Unfortunately, it will be a marriage where you will have to hid your real self, and so will he. In other words, a marriage that will make you miserable and lead to another divorce.
I am still looking for a good book on remarriage. One book I can recommend on man-woman relationships in general is _Loving_Him_without_Losing_You_ by Beverly Engels. Follow her advice to create a healthy relationship between two real people expressing their real personalities--the only basis for a real marriage.

Loving Him without Losing You: How to Stop Disappearing and Start Being Yourself
Loving Him without Losing You: How to Stop Disappearing and Start Being Yourself
by Beverly Engel
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 1.56

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book for creating healthy relationships!, July 26 2000
Having had two failed marriages, I have read numerous books on relationships looking for answers. _Loving_Him_without_Losing_You_ has given me not only a much greater insight into why I have had such problems with men, but has also given me hope that the future can be very different.
Engel speaks to almost every woman, for almost no one has managed to escape the usual relationship "wisdom" in our culture of women "adapting" to meet their men's needs (by hiding accomplishments, giving up interests and friends if "he" doesn't like them, etc.). Engels gives us another, healthier way to build relationships, by staying true to our authentic selves. Ironically, this advice which is so contrary to what most of us learned is the *only* way to have a truly satisfying relationship--more satisfying for the man as well as the woman--as Engel convincingly argues.
Numerous exercises throughout the book help the reader discover her patterns, uncover issues from the past and work through them, and discover her authentic self. Engel also gives valuable information on creating a women's circle or support group, and finding a therapist if necessary.
A compassionate, intelligent, inspiring book. Read it! Buy it! Live it!

The Uncheese Cookbook: Creating Amazing Dairy-Free Cheese Substitutes and Classic "Uncheese" Dishes
The Uncheese Cookbook: Creating Amazing Dairy-Free Cheese Substitutes and Classic "Uncheese" Dishes
by Joanne Stepaniak
Edition: Paperback
31 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Weird!, July 16 2000
While the cheezecake recipes are utterly delicious, I find that many of the savoury cheeze dishes taste just plain weird to me, and my 2 year old son refuses to eat them. Maybe after 7 years as a vegan I've lost my "cheese tooth"! (I don't care for the soy or rice cheezes available commercially either).
If you are a cheese addict, you may enjoy these recipes as much as the other reviewers. But if you've been cheese-free for years like I have, you may wonder why anyone ever wanted to eat cheese in the first place.

Page: 1 | 2