Profile for Robert Cossaboon > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Robert Cossaboon
Top Reviewer Ranking: 408,404
Helpful Votes: 17

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Amazon Communities.

Reviews Written by
Robert Cossaboon "devil doll" (The happy land of Walworth, NY)
(REAL NAME)   

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
pixel
Is More Than A Word
Is More Than A Word
Price: CDN$ 20.03
19 used & new from CDN$ 13.71

3.0 out of 5 stars This is Freedom's first album., June 12 2003
This review is from: Is More Than A Word (Audio CD)
You'd think an album like this could live up to the incendiary words on its cover, but alas, the only freedom touted by the musicians here is the freedom to answer that clarion call of mediocrity. The first song, Together starts out promisingly enough, as most first songs on albums usually do. A hint of some very hard, no-nonsense rock is offered. They even wear the funk hat comfortably on the next song, "Miss Little Louise"; arguably (and very ironically) this song anticipates some of what would be Little Feat's finest work in the later seventies. All too quickly, the band loses its way on "Sweaty Feet", a boring fuzz guitar Chuck Berry clone. "Brainbox Jam" is a grim parable of why you should never mix a wah-wah pedal, with distortion and funk. Suffice it to say, this song does not jam. "Direction" tries to return things back from the never never land of the previous song; it is a great echo of Bobby Harrison's previous band, Procol Harum. "Going Down" is what this album should have been: everything works here; it's heavy and hard hitting with a killer guitar solo and vocal to boot. After that, things get really weird as you enter balladland with "Dream" and "Ladybird". The former tries to show off the band's sensitive side and the latter exhibits the bands jazz sense. Both songs are out of place, because the orchestral/horn dubs completely drown out the band's playing and muddy up what was already a shakey musical identity. Freedom's album isn't a total loss to the ear, but it could have used a stronger musical direction.

Curse of the Devil (Widescreen)
Curse of the Devil (Widescreen)
DVD ~ Paul Naschy
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 15.77
12 used & new from CDN$ 7.97

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars With these kinds of films, you take what you can get., June 11 2003
Once you get past the obvious setbacks of the film: an unconvincing lead, very bad make-up, horribly choreographed violence, and a pretty [weak]ending--there is some enjoyment to be had from Curse of the Devil. To begin with, the story is actually pretty involving and the plot has some tricky forks in it at times. The idea is very good: an arrogant hero pays for that arrogance through a satanic curse, which seemingly is unbeatable. Unfortunately, you have to make the mother of all suspensions of belief to deal with the actual werewolf. Naschy just wasn't suited (bad pun!) for the job. When you do have close-ups of the creature, there just isn't any menace conveyed-merely a frozen make-up expression. When he attacks, it is almost comedic as, for most of the film, he quickly runs on screen and then off before the viewer has a chance to even register what has happened. The opening sequence, if you're able to not laugh at what must be one of the lamest swordfight scenes ever filmed, is kinda cool with the way the pink tint conveys an otherworldly and othertimely atmosphere. The gypsies in the beginning are very convincing in their vengeful rage. All in all, it's not a bad movie. There just aren't that many werewolf movies out there, so Curse of the Devil will come as a happy expansion on what you are already familiar with concerning werewolves of the screen.

Mcdonald & Giles
Mcdonald & Giles
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 82.95
6 used & new from CDN$ 21.70

5.0 out of 5 stars A very much overlooked masterpiece, June 10 2003
This review is from: Mcdonald & Giles (Audio CD)
You really have to dig deep in record stores and look far and wide on internet sites to find this album by ex-King Crimson members Ian McDonald and Michael Giles. It's totally worth the hunt. Far from being a half-baked Crimson rip-off, this album is, to use a much overused monicker, EAR CANDY!! Right from the getgo with the Turnham Green Suite, you get ushered through so many tempo changes your head will spin; by that song's end, you are left happy, and Fantasia-like. Then the mood quiets a bit with Flight of the Ibis, M&G's version of Cadence and Cascade. Is She Waiting is a quiet, piece of comtemplative love. Your attention gets jerked back with Tomorrow's Children, a hippy-like piece that chugs along like a cheerful, broken clock. Things close down with the side-long Birdman Suite, easily one of the best pieces of progressive rock ever recorded. Here, the duo pull out all the stops and just take you away with them into the sunset. After listening, you will appreciate just how much McDonald and Giles really contributed to the first inception of King Crimson--and you will wonder at why they never made anymore music this good together.

Space 1999 Set 7:V13 & 14
Space 1999 Set 7:V13 & 14
DVD ~ Martin Landau
Price: CDN$ 35.63
7 used & new from CDN$ 30.98

2.0 out of 5 stars Man, what a comedown!, June 9 2003
This review is from: Space 1999 Set 7:V13 & 14 (DVD)
I remember, as a kid, the second series was cool because of all the neat creatures the character of Maya would change into; boy, was I so easy to entertain back then? Now, looking at series two, I wince at the changes Anderson made to the series. Gone was Barry Morse, who added a very human element to the experience of Moonbase Alpha. Gone was the dark, command center. Gone was the tension even trying to survive against uncertain odds in space. What replaced all this? Gaucho skirts, more make-up and more action violence in the series. Adding Catherine Schell and skirting all the females was an obvious attempt to sex up the series. Good stories were now sacrificed for gratuitous fisticuffs. Now Moonbase Alpha has become a love boat of joking and good vibrations, not to mention cheesier set designs, poorer film quality, and awful awful awful costumes! Space Warp is complete garbage, while the Bringers of Wonder was no excuse for a two-part episode, let alone one. A Matter of Balance is an anti-matter episode that was done much better in the first season with A Matter of Life and Death. Beta Cloud is imbicilic, but that would be nothing compared to Brian the Brain, (which you can find on another set)! Is this series worth watching? Yeah, but abandon all expectation ye who go there.

Space 1999 Set 1:V1 & 2
Space 1999 Set 1:V1 & 2
DVD ~ Martin Landau
Price: CDN$ 33.99
16 used & new from CDN$ 22.14

5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to Moonbase Alpha, June 9 2003
This review is from: Space 1999 Set 1:V1 & 2 (DVD)
Population: 311, but subject to decrease as the episodes progress. Destination: wherever. The story: moon has been blown out of the earth's orbit due to a monumental nuclear waste cockup and is now sailing through the universe; its residents are surviving, but barely, and are desperate to find a new place to settle. So much for the premise of Anderson's biggest budgeted series ever, and what a fine series it was!--at least during the first year. Space: 1999 had many strengths, chiefly the fine acting talent in Landau, Bain and Morse, who played my favorite character, Professor Bergman. The tone of most of the episodes is dark and claustrophobic, but always served up with just enough awe and wonder to justify the series's existence. The best episode of this set and of season one is Black Sun, which combines some really thick science with a dash of metaphysics and fatalism. Another Time, Another Place is a fine mind-blower, while Earthbound (with guest star Christopher Lee) brings a closure the the character of Commissioner Simmons. As I said, the first series was dark (thanks largely in part to those awesome minimalist set designs), but the stories were infinitely more interesting and compelling.

Bootleg Series, Vol. 1: The Quine Tapes   [3 Cd Box Set]
Bootleg Series, Vol. 1: The Quine Tapes [3 Cd Box Set]
Offered by thebookcommunity_ca
Price: CDN$ 216.39
5 used & new from CDN$ 45.00

3.0 out of 5 stars These are called bootlegs for a reason., June 8 2003
And that reason is that the recording quality usually stinks atrociously-the Quine Tapes of the Velvet Underground concerts just before the release of Loaded are no exception. The technology is out there to clean messes like this up (listen to King Crimson's Epitaph box set and prepare for an epiphany in digital transfer and cleanup), so the real tragedy is the missed opportunity to get the message out that the Velvet Underground was, bar none, the most original American band of their time. Still, for the fan, this 3 disc set will be a sweet deal. Included are not one, not two, but THREE savage versions of Sister Ray-or Sister Rave-up . . . you'll get the drift once you listen. You will also be treated to a pre-Loaded version of Rock and Roll, sans killer guitar solo; the same can be said of What Goes On, longer but inferior to the studio version and the live version on the five disc boxed-set. Other stand-outs, however are Foggy Notion, which just sizzles on disc one, and the one-two attack of Follow the Leader and White Light White Heat on disc two-these two songs together run over 27 minutes, still not as long as the Sister Ray version that closes the disc!

Evil Dead (Widescreen)
Evil Dead (Widescreen)
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Price: CDN$ 17.55
22 used & new from CDN$ 4.24

4.0 out of 5 stars "Why are you torturing me like this? Why??", June 6 2003
This review is from: Evil Dead (Widescreen) (DVD)
Welcome to the first film of director Sam Raimi's career, and the first film of what would become a massive cult following for Bruce Campbell. Here in this film Raimi answers the age-old cinema question: how do you create a work of art with little money and very crappy actors? Answer: some kickbutt makeup effects and very psychedelic camera zoom shots, and then throw in some humorous possessed-by-demons characters who still manage to scare the living you know what out of you. For pointless trivia, it is about 15 minutes into the movie before someone does the first really stupid thing (unless you count renting an abandoned cabin in middle of the Tennessee woods an act of stupidity in and of itself), namely playing a reel-to-reel tape of a demon invokation spell. After that, the hits just keep coming. And therein lies the genius of the movie. It is so fast-paced that it leaves little room for predictability right up to the ending. Far from being sentimental, Raimi pulls no punches with the carnage, which includes a wonderfully choreographed vine-rape scene! If you are looking for plausibility, check that at the door; if you are looking for convincing acting, rent Silence of the Lambs. And by the way, who would've thought in a million years, after seeing him in this movie, that Bruce Campbell would become a half-way decent actor?

Evil Dead (Widescreen)
Evil Dead (Widescreen)
DVD ~ Bruce Campbell
Price: CDN$ 17.55
22 used & new from CDN$ 4.24

4.0 out of 5 stars Join us . . ., June 6 2003
This review is from: Evil Dead (Widescreen) (DVD)
Welcome to the first film of director Sam Raimi's career, and the first film of what would become a massive cult following for Bruce Campbell. Here in this film Raimi answers the age-old cinema question: how do you create a work of art with little money and very [bad] actors? Answer: some [great] makeup effects and very psychedelic camera zoom shots. For pointless trivia, it is about 15 minutes into the movie before someone does the first really stupid thing (unless you count renting an abandoned cabin in middle of the Tennessee woods an act of stupidity in and of itself), namely playing a reel-to-reel tape of a demon invokation spell. After that, the hits just keep coming. And therein lies the genius of the movie. It is so fast-paced that it leaves little room for predictability right up to the ending. Far from being sentimental, Raimi pulls no punches with the carnage, which includes a wonderfully choreographed vine-rape scene! If you are looking for plausibility, check that at the door; if you are looking for convincing acting, rent Silence of the Lambs...

Box Set
Box Set
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 90.95
5 used & new from CDN$ 32.69

3.0 out of 5 stars Stampede it is not., June 5 2003
This review is from: Box Set (Audio CD)
Stampede was the legendary lost album by Buffalo Springfield, which supposedly had some fine tracks, such as Neighbor Don't You Worry, Sell Out, Down To the Wire, and many other hitherto unheard of gems. Well, to give the box-set some credit, a few of these gems have been brought to light. There is a fine version of Young's composition, Down To The Wire, which is sung by Stills. Also included is a song, "Down Down Down", which would later be recycled for the Country Girl suite on CSN&Y's Deja-Vu album. There are some good unreleased tracks, but they get buried in the mountain of demos you have to fast forward through to listen to. To get down to the Nitty Gritty, this set has too much fat and grizzle on it. The demo tracks are neither shed new light on the composition in question nor are they of good audio quality. A whole disc (the fourth) is devoted to a remastering of the first two Springfield albums. Biiiiig deal. The songs were already scattered across the first three discs at least twice over! I'm not big on remastering, because usually this involves tweaking a bass line here, and adjusting a treble there to what essentially was the same song in the first place. The remasters here do no justice to anything. Did you know that there was an extended version of Bluebird that lasts for over 8 minutes?

Zombie (Widescreen)
Zombie (Widescreen)
DVD ~ DVD
Offered by OMydeals
Price: CDN$ 63.24
11 used & new from CDN$ 13.41

4.0 out of 5 stars You will be what they eat!, June 5 2003
This review is from: Zombie (Widescreen) (DVD)
Wow, what can you say about a movie that already has 174 reviews at the time of this reviewing? Welcome to Fulci's grand meditation on alienation and excessive stupidity. This is one of the great man under zombie siege films-and thus the two levels of alienation: the obvious one where our lead characters are separated from the rest of the world, but also the subtle metaphor/allegory that seems to be in all the Romero movies, and which Fulci marvelously borrowed for this film, of the zombie=drone=modern man slowly cut off from vestiges of humanity until all that's left is the automaton, (or taken to its logical conclusion, because life is also a process of humanity) the undead zombie. As for the stupidity part, this is where the movie becomes a little confusing, as we aren't given any definitive reason the zombies have started to bee-bop across a Caribbean island in the first place; is it a disease or is it voodoo, and if it was voodoo, why the heck raise flesh-eating zombies in the first place? Other elements of the film coalesce into a triumph as well: the soundtrack is, along with Suspiria's, one of the few truly creepy soundtracks; the make-up effects for the zombies are mind-blowing, to say nothing of the violence they wreak; there is the shot of the zombies slowly crossing the Brooklyn Bridge towards the city; finally, because it is so novel, there's that shark wrestling scene near the beginning. As for DVD extras, there is a commentary track, but it isn't very long. There are some good radio/television promo spots, but that's about it. Too bad there couldn't have been a featurette on the making of this movie, but you can't have everything can you!

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7