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Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada)
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Coach Carter - Ws No Gwp
Coach Carter - Ws No Gwp
Offered by M and N Media Canada
Price: CDN$ 104.02
5 used & new from CDN$ 15.85

5.0 out of 5 stars An Exceptionally Absorbing Sports Movie Which Holds the Attention and That Inculcates the Effective and Lasting Values in Life, Feb. 12 2014
This review is from: Coach Carter - Ws No Gwp (DVD)
This motion picture has a great, big, wonderful heart! Lots of grit, too. Coach Carter, whose real life story and those of his players the film recounts, has a vision (and the fortitude to carry it out), of high school basketball that does not sacrifice, in the name of high sports achievement, the academic grades, college/university aspirations, and better lives in adulthood for which his young player players also should be striving after high school is over.

Those were realistic goals and reasonable hopes back in 2005, when this film was released. Since then, due to the ongoing (as of 2014 as I write this) collapse of the U.S. economy that set in during 2007-2008, largely due to years of off-shoring American jobs (industrial, office, technical, and much professional work alike) and to the collusion of the cynical financiers of Wall Street and the corrupt U.S. government, such hopes have waned and higher education seems mostly nowadays to leave the young with crushing student debt to pay off without the job prospects that once had been there for graduates to seize hold of. However, this film also, from the educational standpoint, is about staying through high school to graduation with decent marks, and that, at least, would help to prepare American workers for so many of the more menial jobs that are left in the wrecked U.S. economy after the devastations that "Free Trade" policies have inflicted upon the labour market and, also, of the further financial ruin that has set in from 2008 onwards.

However, how it was in 2005 is, in so many essential ways, what the world really should be like and what the promise that civilised life, indeed, should hold! In the film, all of the sportsmen, the coach and his young basketball team members alike, who are struggling to live out Coach Carter's work ethic, are in and of Richmond, a "disadvantaged town of mixed black, chicano, and some white population, in Northern California's Bay (Greater San Francisco) area, rather like the Southeast Los Angeles (Bell, Southgate, Watts) area of part of my own childhood, further south in the same state.

The music is excellent, too, hot and energetic, as the kids like it, expertly crafted and delivered. Perhaps best of all, for those who love sport, at any rate, is the intense and skillful basketball playing seen. This movie simply has it all!

Léandre Bergeron, né en exil
Léandre Bergeron, né en exil
by Sylvain Rivière
Edition: Paperback
8 used & new from CDN$ 22.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Life and Musings of an Important Man of Canadian Left Politics, of Linguistics and Lexicography, and of Much More, Feb. 10 2014
Partly, this fascinating glimpse, into the life and mind of Léandre Bergeron who has long lived on his farm in the Abitibi region of Québec, is biographical. In larger part, the book collects writings on his thoughts about his many interests, republishing various writings, by and about him, from his illustrious and colourfully varied past. Because so much of the book is a compilation, it is uneven and a bit wayward, but nonetheless it constitutes a probing and significant work in Léandre Bergeron's and, of course, Sylvain Rivest's respective bibliographies. Léandre Bergeron was one of the leading figures of the Québec and Canadian Left and of strongly Marxust-tinged Québec nationalism, during the exciting years of the 1960s and 1970s. During those years he was teaching at Concordia University, one of the rare Francophone professors during those years on this institution's faculty. The man's English is nearly as impeccable as his French is, something that may surprise those who know of Bergeron's importance in defending the cause of Québécois French, even of "Joual" slang dialect.

Despite being a Franco-Manitoban of humble origin, but educated in France, Léandre Bergeron spent much of his life in intellectual and literary endeavours, as well as in militancy. This aspect of his life and thought is very to the fore in his most famous, rousing "indépendantiste" (or "separatist" as so many federalist Canadians dismissively call this tendency), and popular work, "Le Petit manuel d'histoire du Québec", recently revised, updated, and much expanded in a new edition which Pierre Landry undertook for Bergeron and which Éditions Trois-Pistoles published in 2008. However, after becoming disillusioned with, and tired of, life as an university professor in Montréal, Bergeron willingly gave up his former life to set himself up in agriculture and then, notoriously and wonderfully, in baking and health food, earning his living by manual labour on the farm in the company of his vigourous wife Francine, of his livestock, horses, farm dog, and valiantly wolf-slaying donkey. This was an honest and determined choice; circumstances did not compel Bergeron to make such a change. Living in the country in the rural stretches of Rouyn-Noranda, he home-schooled his daughters, whose births were undertaken by midwifery (about which he wrote a much translated manual), baked, and farmed for his living.

Léandre Bergeron has never shied away from controversy or, at times, collisions with political and bureaucratic "authority". Having become a philosophical and practical anarchist, one of reasoned and moderate rather than radical persuasion, Bergeron has remained in the public eye for his many wide and deeply probing pursuits, including, among them, a strong interest in the philology and lexicography of the French language, especially as used in Québec. (Those familiar with his rather extreme "Dictionnaire de la langue québécoise" ought to explore also his other published writings about French linguistics, few in number but very insightful.)

Nonetheless, this man of thought is not one to "pigeon-hole" easily (not at all, really!). Bergeron also wrote for a wide readership, for the working man at least much as for those who cultivate learning and the arts. His interests range widely and his convictions can be more unpredictable than those of many writers who wear their intellectual credentials on their sleeves. Besides this interesting book and others by and about Léandre Bergeron, one can get an introductory glimpse into his life and thought by means of the documentary film about him, "Léandre Bergeron: avec conviction, sans espoir", which Sylvain Rivest undertook (for Canada's National Film Board), as he also did the monograph, "Né en exil". The film's title reflects Bergeron's combination of honesty, commitment, and pessimism. The reader who has a moderate command of French, or above that level, will profit much from reading the pages of this book!

Yes (Sous-titres français)
Yes (Sous-titres français)
DVD ~ Joan Allen
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 24.49
30 used & new from CDN$ 7.01

4.0 out of 5 stars This Film Strives for Sublime Ertocism and Goes about That in Some Very Imaginative Ways, Feb. 6 2014
This review is from: Yes (Sous-titres français) (DVD)
This erotic fantasy, "Yes", one with lots of bared skin but nothing close to full nudity (no outright full dorsal or frontal nakedness), is a bit patchy. Simon Abkarian is a sleekly lean, handsome, and well-made man, so it is worth seeing as much, literally, of him as one can! His slyly affectionate gallantries endear him to viewers as they so do, obviously, to the lady who benefits from his amourous attentions. At its best, the first part of the film when the couple is getting ever closer to each other in intimacy, there is a wonderful dreamlike quality, which the lilt of the poetic verses in which the characters (they and others in the film) converse carries one along drifting on the lyricism of the screenplay.

When "love goes bad", however, the film seems unconvincingly motivated. The lovers have, for awhile, irreconcilable cultural antagonism that their affair really does not seem to justify except in barren stereotypes. Thus the temporary rupture between them (which, along with losing his job in the U.K., results in the man's return to Beyrouth, in his native Lebanon) seems too contrived to be more naturally convincing. Not to worry, though, the lovers reconcile, on (for them) the neutral turf of Cuba and all ends hopefully (or so, at least, it seems) for this pair, from what I could grasp of the film. There are subsidiary characters and narratives in the movie which other reviewers on Amazon's various national WWW sites describe in their own reviews, so I shall not delve into them here.

It would have helped enormously if there had been English subtitles. I am becoming somewhat hard of hearing and there was much of the dialogue that simply did not register on my ears. There are French subtitles (in, at any rate, the North American edition that I acquired, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment 10906, in the series, "Sony Pictures Classics"), but this film so strives (intermittently successfully and short of that) for a literary effect in English that seeing and understanding the original text along with the images really would count for much. (Fortunately, Newmarket Press has published the film script.) The extra feature, about some of the filming of the movie, is likely only to be of interest to those with an understanding of, and/or fascination with, technical and some artistic matters of film work.

Coach Carter
Coach Carter
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 14.58
23 used & new from CDN$ 4.48

5.0 out of 5 stars Hard Work Pays off in High School Basketball and in Life beyond, as Coach Carter Trains His Boys, Feb. 5 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Coach Carter (DVD)
This motion picture has a great, big, wonderful heart! Lots of grit, too. Coach Carter, whose real life story and those of his players the film recounts, has a vision (and the fortitude to carry it out), of high school basketball that does not sacrifice, in the name of high sports achievement, the academic grades, college/university aspirations, and better lives in adulthood for which his young player players also should be striving after high school is over.

Those were realistic goals and reasonable hopes back in 2005, when this film was released. Since then, due to the ongoing (as of 2014 as I write this) collapse of the U.S. economy that set in during 2007-2008, largely due to years of off-shoring American jobs (industrial, office, technical, and much professional work alike) and to the collusion of the cynical financiers of Wall Street and the corrupt U.S. government, such hopes have waned and higher education seems mostly nowadays to leave the young with crushing student debt to pay off without the job prospects that once had been there for graduates to seize hold of. However, this film also, from the educational standpoint, is about staying through high school to graduation with decent marks, and that, at least, would help to prepare American workers for so many of the more menial jobs that are left in the wrecked U.S. economy after the devastations that "Free Trade" policies have inflicted upon the labour market and, also, of the further financial ruin that has set in from 2008 onwards.

However, how it was in 2005 is, in so many essential ways, what the world really should be like and what the promise that civilised life, indeed, should hold! In the film, all of the sportsmen, the coach and his young basketball team members alike, who are struggling to live out Coach Carter's work ethic, are in and of Richmond, a "disadvantaged town of mixed black, chicano, and some white population, in Northern California's Bay (Greater San Francisco) area, rather like the Southeast Los Angeles (Bell, Southgate, Watts) area of part of my own childhood, further south in the same state.

The music is excellent, too, hot and energetic, as the kids like it, expertly crafted and delivered. Perhaps best of all, for those who love sport, at any rate, is the intense and skillful basketball playing seen. This movie simply has it all!

Coach Carter (Bilingual)
Coach Carter (Bilingual)
DVD ~ Rob Brown
Price: CDN$ 9.93
4 used & new from CDN$ 9.65

5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific Film about Sports and Educational Values Alike!, Feb. 4 2014
This review is from: Coach Carter (Bilingual) (DVD)
This motion picture has a great, big, wonderful heart! Lots of grit, too. Coach Carter, whose real life story and those of his players the film recounts, has a vision (and the fortitude to carry it out), of high school basketball that does not sacrifice, in the name of high sports achievement, the academic grades, college/university aspirations, and better lives in adulthood for which his young player players also should be striving after high school is over.

Those were realistic goals and reasonable hopes back in 2005, when this film was released. Since then, due to the ongoing (as of 2014 as I write this) collapse of the U.S. economy that set in during 2007-2008, largely due to years of off-shoring American jobs (industrial, office, technical, and much professional work alike) and to the collusion of the cynical financiers of Wall Street and the corrupt U.S. government, such hopes have waned and higher education seems mostly nowadays to leave the young with crushing student debt to pay off without the job prospects that once had been there for graduates to seize hold of. However, this film also, from the educational standpoint, is about staying through high school to graduation with decent marks, and that, at least, would help to prepare American workers for so many of the more menial jobs that are left in the wrecked U.S. economy after the devastations that "Free Trade" policies have inflicted upon the labour market and, also, of the further financial ruin that has set in from 2008 onwards.

However, how it was in 2005 is, in so many essential ways, what the world really should be like and what the promise that civilised life, indeed, should hold! In the film, all of the sportsmen, the coach and his young basketball team members alike, who are struggling to live out Coach Carter's work ethic, are in and of Richmond, a "disadvantaged town of mixed black, chicano, and some white population, in Northern California's Bay (Greater San Francisco) area, rather like the Southeast Los Angeles (Bell, Southgate, Watts) area of part of my own childhood, further south in the same state.

The music is excellent, too, hot and energetic, as the kids like it, expertly crafted and delivered. Perhaps best of all, for those who love sport, at any rate, is the intense and skillful basketball playing seen. This movie simply has it all!

Timeless
Timeless
Price: CDN$ 16.99
30 used & new from CDN$ 10.42

1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Proficient Blues, but "Timelessly" Flawed!, Jan. 28 2014
This review is from: Timeless (Audio CD)
John Hammond Jr.'s blues singing and playing, on this or any other of his recordings and in his public shows, is earnest and full of good intentions. It also is flawlessly well executed. What Hammond lacks is authenticity. It is not just that his accent in singing is so utterly wealthy-New-York-City-WASP-faking-the-South, unsurprisingly given Hammond's background of privilege and class. A few other white bluesmen, including some here in Canada and certainly in the U.K., are wonderful and they don't need to fake "Southerness". They make blues music in their own ethnic, national, and class-sympathetic ways. Think, for example, of John Baldry, from the U.K. (who chose to become Canadian), in his genuinely blues work. The problem is that Hammond sounds so synthetic and unconvincingly derivative compared to such really good white men or women of blues. With the passage of the years he has not improved really at all. The blues spirit, feeling, and genuine aesthetic just are not there, despite Hammond's ability to copy outwardly the characteristics and mannerisms of blues. That has been the case in his past and in present work, despite all the gloss and virtuosity.

If Hammond really had wanted to cultivate a convincing Southern accent (black or white, down there, is not all that different, a matter of degree and of nuance as much as of anything else), in his delivery, in speech as well as in singing, he could have relocated, long ago, to one of the major urban centres (e.g., Birmingham, Louisville, New Orleans, Atlanta, Little Rock, among the many choices), residing there long enough to live out and to acclimate to Southern culture. He always has had, after all, the independent means to dwell wheresoever he chooses. Then, if he really felt the need to assume some kind of Southern accent in his singing, it would have sounded genuine, not irritatingly, gratingly false. He then could have returned North, gone West, wherever, with "the real thing" as part of his blues equipage, instead of trying hard, and not succeeding, to fake a Southern accent. It probably is those, like many in Canada, who are least accustomed to hearing real Southerners speak who most can ignore, tolerate, and/or remain oblivious to Hammond's ersatz accent.

Short of that, Hammond could have limited himself to instrumental blues or to playing lead guitar for blues vocalists other than himself. However, none of this kind of thing is now, or was then, necessary; many white blues performers sing in their own natural, everyday accents and are quite convincing enough just like that without striving to emulate any of the various Southern accents that characterise blacks and whites in the Southern U.S. in their speech and singing. Sadly, Hammond has not chosen a better route in developing that vocal aspect of his blues-making and, further, many young non-Southern blues performers have imitated his vocal mannerisms, which has made his influence downright baneful.

I saw Hammond once, years ago, in Ottawa, when he was still beautiful and charmingly boyish, continuing to look as if here were just out of his teens; he was a crowd pleaser, if only because of that personable appeal and grace. Fortunately for me, he was on a double bill with a truly marvellous young blues artist. That made it worth that particular show and I simply bided time till the other dude came on. Regarding Hammond himself, however, for this jazz lover, any other concert of him is for me a "no-go" happening, and no way would I waste money on his recordings. I would rather listen to doo-wop or any kind of popular black music or, for that matter, of much of white rock music, than to endure Hammond's cultivated and sincere fakery, mostly due to his irksome phony accent ("white dude aping the Southern black") which grates upon and irritates the sensibilities of the perceptive listener rather than pleases him in any way!

A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE INCLUDING THE APOCRYPHA
A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE INCLUDING THE APOCRYPHA
by CHARLES GORE HENRY LEIGHTON GOUDGE ALFRED GUILLAUME
Edition: Hardcover
2 used & new from CDN$ 46.74

4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Great and Most Scholarly Commentaries on the Entire Bible (O.T., Apocrypha, and N.T.), Jan. 24 2014
I have owned, used, and cherished this great Bible commentary for many years. I have many of Charles Gore's other books, too. He was a great English scholar, writer, and bishop (in the Church of England), who attempted to reconcile "Anglo-Catholicism" with the Neo-Orthodoxy that was coalescing on the European continent in Reformed circles (and, to an extent, within Lutheranism); think, reader, most notably of Gore's younger contemporaries, Karl Barth and Emil Brunner.

I no longer accept Neo-Orthodoxy, Anglican, Lutheran, or Reformed, as I did rather enthusiastically when younger; there is an inherent acidity in that thought which leads, eventually and on a downwardly sloping trajectory, to modernism and unbelief. Gore, compared to the continental Neo-Orthodox theologians, was more DEVOUT and less recklessly speculative than the likes of Barth. He also, as an Anglo-Catholic (even if one of somewhat liberal mindset) was more willing to accept the lastingly valued place of Holy Tradition in Catholic thought across the ages. This caution is evident in "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" (1928), on Gore's part and on that of his collaborators, in its original and later editions and printings, of which I own two. Thus, even though I hold now to a view of Holy Scripture that asserts more fully its inerrant (infallible) nature and authority, I still find the devout as well as scholarly approach of Gore and of his Anglo-Catholic fellow Churchmen, in this and in others of his (and their) writings to be very worthwhile to take into consideration.

A great asset of this fine commentary is its inclusion of the writings of the "Apocrypha" (deuterocanon) of the Old Testament, as included in such Anglican Bible translations as the great Authorised ("King James") Version of 1611 and the less acceptable late Nineteenth Century's Revised Version, which were the versions of Scripture in English upon which (and upon the original language sources) Gore and his contemporaries most relied. For readers who take the deuterocanonical writings seriously, Gore's commentary is one of the few non-Roman Catholic works of its kind to cover that part of the Old Testament.

Reprint specialty firms have issued "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" several times in recent years, so one no longer needs to search for its original editions and printings in used books shops and other antiquarian sources of supply. Those original printings and the reprints alike are easily accessible through on-line sources such as Amazon's various national WWW sites. If one really has any aspirations to Biblical learning, lay, clerical, or scholarly, one truly ought to own this agelessly valuable resource. Get it!

A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE INCLUDING THE APOCRYPHA
A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE INCLUDING THE APOCRYPHA
by CHARLES; GOUDGE, HENRY LEIGHTON; GUILLAUME, ALFRED (EDITORS) GORE
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars A Commentary on the Entire Bible (Including the "Apocrypha" of the O.T.) of Lasting Value, Jan. 24 2014
I have owned, used, and cherished this great Bible commentary for many years. I have many of Charles Gore's other books, too. He was a great English scholar, writer, and bishop (in the Church of England), who attempted to reconcile "Anglo-Catholicism" with the Neo-Orthodoxy that was coalescing on the European continent in Reformed circles (and, to an extent, within Lutheranism); think, reader, most notably of Gore's younger contemporaries, Karl Barth and Emil Brunner.

I no longer accept Neo-Orthodoxy, Anglican, Lutheran, or Reformed, as I did rather enthusiastically when younger; there is an inherent acidity in that thought which leads, eventually and on a downwardly sloping trajectory, to modernism and unbelief. Gore, compared to the continental Neo-Orthodox theologians, was more DEVOUT and less recklessly speculative than the likes of Barth. He also, as an Anglo-Catholic (even if one of somewhat liberal mindset) was more willing to accept the lastingly valued place of Holy Tradition in Catholic thought across the ages. This caution is evident in "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" (1928), on Gore's part and on that of his collaborators, in its original and later editions and printings, of which I own two. Thus, even though I hold now to a view of Holy Scripture that asserts more fully its inerrant (infallible) nature and authority, I still find the devout as well as scholarly approach of Gore and of his Anglo-Catholic fellow Churchmen, in this and in others of his (and their) writings to be very worthwhile to take into consideration.

A great asset of this fine commentary is its inclusion of the writings of the "Apocrypha" (deuterocanon) of the Old Testament, as included in such Anglican Bible translations as the great Authorised ("King James") Version of 1611 and the less acceptable late Nineteenth Century's Revised Version, which were the versions of Scripture in English upon which (and upon the original language sources) Gore and his contemporaries most relied. For readers who take the deuterocanonical writings seriously, Gore's commentary is one of the few non-Roman Catholic works of its kind to cover that part of the Old Testament.

Reprint specialty firms have issued "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" several times in recent years, so one no longer needs to search for its original editions and printings in used books shops and other antiquarian sources of supply. Those original printings and the reprints alike are easily accessible through on-line sources such as Amazon's various national WWW sites. If one really has any aspirations to Biblical learning, lay, clerical, or scholarly, one truly ought to own this agelessly valuable resource. Get it!

A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE
A NEW COMMENTARY ON HOLY SCRIPTURE
by Charles (1853-1932) Gore
Edition: Hardcover
7 used & new from CDN$ 17.55

4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Commentary, Even if Its Exegetical Bias Is Quasi-Neo-Orthodox Rather Than More Fully Traditional Catholic, Jan. 23 2014
I have owned, used, and cherished this great Bible commentary for many years. I have many of Charles Gore's other books, too. He was a great English scholar, writer, and bishop (in the Church of England), who attempted to reconcile "Anglo-Catholicism" with the Neo-Orthodoxy that was coalescing on the European continent in Reformed circles (and, to an extent, within Lutheranism); think, reader, most notably of Gore's younger contemporaries, Karl Barth and Emil Brunner.

I no longer accept Neo-Orthodoxy, Anglican, Lutheran, or Reformed, as I did rather enthusiastically when younger; there is an inherent acidity in that thought which leads, eventually and on a downwardly sloping trajectory, to modernism and unbelief. Gore, compared to the continental Neo-Orthodox theologians, was more DEVOUT and less recklessly speculative than the likes of Barth. He also, as an Anglo-Catholic (even if one of somewhat liberal mindset) was more willing to accept the lastingly valued place of Holy Tradition in Catholic thought across the ages. This caution is evident in "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" (1928), on Gore's part and on that of his collaborators, in its original and later editions and printings, of which I own two. Thus, even though I hold now to a view of Holy Scripture that asserts more fully its inerrant (infallible) nature and authority, I still find the devout as well as scholarly approach of Gore and of his Anglo-Catholic fellow Churchmen, in this and in others of his (and their) writings to be very worthwhile to take into consideration.

A great asset of this fine commentary is its inclusion of the writings of the "Apocrypha" (deuterocanon) of the Old Testament, as included in such Anglican Bible translations as the great Authorised ("King James") Version of 1611 and the less acceptable late Nineteenth Century's Revised Version, which were the versions of Scripture in English upon which (and upon the original language sources) Gore and his contemporaries most relied. For readers who take the deuterocanonical writings seriously, Gore's commentary is one of the few non-Roman Catholic works of its kind to cover that part of the Old Testament.

Reprint specialty firms have issued "A New Commentary on Holy Scripture" several times in recent years, so one no longer needs to search for its original editions and printings in used books shops and other antiquarian sources of supply. Those original printings and the reprints alike are easily accessible through on-line sources such as Amazon's various national WWW sites. If one really has any aspirations to Biblical learning, lay, clerical, or scholarly, one truly ought to own this agelessly valuable resource. Get it!

Stone Five Take A Chance
Stone Five Take A Chance
5 used & new from CDN$ 40.30

3.0 out of 5 stars Pleasant Romance, a Film Made for Video, Set in the L.D.S. "Mormon Country" of Idaho, Jan. 22 2014
This review is from: Stone Five Take A Chance (DVD)
This is a made-for-video movie about the doings of two lovable rascals, brothers from Texas, who come a-wooing, under false pretenses, to the L.D.S. Mormon-land of Idaho (just to the north of Utah and, in many ways, almost as L.D.S. Mormon as Utah itself, Idaho being, as many will recall, the Mormon cultural homeland of of one of the two male gay lovers whose plight "Latter Days" cinematically recounts, partly in Idaho settings). The movie will appeal to a limited audience in the morally jaded film-consuming landscape of the contemporary U. S. of A., but for those seeking "family fare", this makes good viewing around the familial video-playing T.V. set.

The two rather average-looking but rather rugged "Romeos of the West" have come to find a girl whose picture, posing in a family photo, the lads have seen and with whom one of the brothers tumbles hopelessly in love just from that photographic clue. To gain access to the Idaho girl's home, they pose as exchange students from Eastern Europe whose arrival the family of the girl is expecting. The boys are sufficiently bewildered at the Mormon culture of the town, the family, and of other folks in the Idaho community, a lot different from what they have known in Texas, so the two amourous brothers are able to convey an impression of bewilderment that everyone expects of foreign exchange students. The brother of the twain who is not already "hooked on" a particular girl even before arrival in Idaho, plays off the affection of two young women whom he encounters in the town, and that begins to make things confusing, eventually resulting in "blowing their cover". Complications ensue. However, love overcomes all and two pairs of lovers emerge from the confusion, adding two youthful males to Idaho's population. (They do not intend now to return to Texas.)

The film obviously was made for and by L.D.S. Mormons, mostly, one assumes, for their own kind. That said, while the ethos and much of the detail clearly betoken a L.D.S. Mormon culture, there are some details that seem surprising to this viewer, whose mother, and all of the relatives on her side of the family, come from an Utah family. The local ward-house looks resembles a Protestant Christian facility more than it does the Mormon meeting houses that I recall from my childhood, way back in the early 1950s. The presence of a cross in the chancel, for example, is not (or, at any rate, was not then) typical of Mormon ecclesiastical architecture. I almost begain to wonder if that house of worship was of the "Community of Christ" (R.L.D.S. Mormon) rather than L.D.S. I suppose that this visual bit of confusion may simply be there to cater to more usual Christian sensibilities and expectations, for the sake of appeal to non-Mormons (i.e., non-L.D.S.) among viewers.

The movie is, obviously, low-budget but not downright cheap. The acting, while hardly extraordinary, is passable, with the exception of cast member Robert Swenson (playing "Doogie"), whose bizarre motions and body language would seem to betoken odd expectations on his part of what an actor ought to do on set and on screen. Well, the cast, like the movie itself, is moderate in quality, but appealing enough to make seeing "Take a Chance" worth it for viewers who do not insist upon rampant licentiousness, on loose language, and upon seeing bedded-down or rug-rolling couples thrashing naked in the throes of fornication (and, admittedly, that sort of thing can be quite a lot of fun to watch!), as suitable fare to arouse their pleasure in a 20s-something double romance. One can take a chance on "Take a Chance" without undue disappointment.

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