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Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada)
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Music Lovers' Encyclopedia; Containing a Pronouncing and Defining Dictionary of Terms, Instruments, Etc., Including a Key to the Pronunciation of Sixt
Music Lovers' Encyclopedia; Containing a Pronouncing and Defining Dictionary of Terms, Instruments, Etc., Including a Key to the Pronunciation of Sixt
by Rupert Hughes
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 57.75
4 used & new from CDN$ 57.75

4.0 out of 5 stars An Old Home Musical Companion Which Merits Such Reprinting, Feb. 17 2013
The main reason that any practising musician or other music professional of any real sophistication would continue to use this venerable old handbook and dictionary, frequently reissued over the last (20th) century, is for the sake of its biographical section. An edition of this enchiridion from the early 1950s is the one which I used as a young music student from early adolescence onwards; later in life I acquired also one the earlier editions or printings, dated 1912, with "Cyclopedia" as the third word in the title proper. There are numerous other such seemingly superannuated music dictionaries (especially in German and in English), and this one is not even among the very best of suchlike (if one were to make comparisons of it, for example, with similar works, such items as, among them, "Baltzell's Dictionary of Musicians" or back editions of "Kürschners Deutscher Musiker-Kalender"), but it remains useful, as others of the kind do for much the same reasons, and, unlike many such others which are even more desirable to track down for purchase than Rupert Hughes' compendium happens to be, his work is relatively easy to find for sale, usually inexpensively, in used book stores in the Dominion of Canada and in the U. S. of A.

The entries in the biographical section (which endures as the portion of Rupert Hughes' handbook the most abidingly of interest) are rather perfunctory, succinct, and usually accurate, but that part of the guide, happily, includes the names of many minor composers, musical editors, performers, once widely respected (but now largely forgotten) pedagogues, and others, especially of the 18th and 19th centureis, for whom one seldom encounters entries in later music biographical or general music dictionaries and cyclopaedias. For tracking down such musical "lesser luminaries", even if one might wish that more more ample information about them were included, at least what the modest entries provide makes for a good departure point for learning, at the very least, the "bare essentials" (dates and so forth) about these figures, and often a bit more as well.

As for musical terminology, which is in another alphabetically arranged section of Rupert Hughes' handbook, one really should acquire a later, more scholarly work, such as any edition of the Harvard Dictionary of Music; even a concise (abridged) paperback edition of that work will suffice a student, most of the time, up to and through the first two years of college, university, or conservatory studies. For his part, Hughes, at least, does not get things so wrong as similar works by many popularisers of his kind, then or now, sometimes do. The miscellaneous articles that make up the balance of the volume, even if of lesser significance, are welcome, in some cases even of lasting value. The various editions across the years of this humble book, all of it or of the separately published parts of it, continue to be worth having at hand.

Music Lovers' Encyclopedia
Music Lovers' Encyclopedia
by Rupert Hughes
Edition: Hardcover
9 used & new from CDN$ 14.92

4.0 out of 5 stars An Hoary Old Home Companion to Classical Music That Retains Some Interest Even Today, Feb. 17 2013
The main reason that any practising musician or other music professional of any real sophistication would continue to use this venerable old handbook and dictionary, frequently reissued over the last (20th) century, is for the sake of its biographical section. An edition of this enchiridion from the early 1950s is the one which I used as a young music student from early adolescence onwards; later in life I acquired also an earlier edition or printing (dated 1912 with "Cyclopedia" as the third word in the title proper). There are numerous other such seemingly superannuated music dictionaries (especially in German and in English), and this one is not even among the very best of suchlike (if one were to make comparisons of it, for example, with similar works, such items as, among them, "Baltzell's Dictionary of Musicians" or back editions of "Kürschners Deutscher Musiker-Kalender"), but it remains useful, as others of the kind do for much the same reasons, and, unlike many such others which are even more desirable to track down for purchase than Rupert Hughes' compendium happens to be, his work is relatively easy to find for sale, usually inexpensively, in used book stores in the Dominion of Canada and in the U. S. of A.

The entries in the biographical section (which endures as the portion of Rupert Hughes' handbook the most abidingly of interest) are rather perfunctory, succinct, and usually accurate, but that part of the guide, happily, includes the names of many minor composers, musical editors, performers, once widely respected (but now largely forgotten) pedagogues, and others, especially of the 18th and 19th centureis, for whom one seldom encounters entries in later music biographical or general music dictionaries and cyclopaedias. For tracking down such musical "lesser luminaries", even if one might wish that more more ample information about them were included, at least what the modest entries provide makes for a good departure point for learning, at the very least, the "bare essentials" (dates and so forth) about these figures, and often a bit more as well.

As for musical terminology, which is in another alphabetically arranged section of Rupert Hughes' handbook, one really should acquire a later, more scholarly work, such as any edition of the Harvard Dictionary of Music; even a concise (abridged) paperback edition of that work will suffice a student, most of the time, up to and through the first two years of college, university, or conservatory studies. For his part, Hughes, at least, does not get things so wrong as similar works by many popularisers of his kind, then or now, sometimes do. The miscellaneous articles that make up the balance of the volume, even if of lesser significance, are welcome, in some cases even of lasting value. The various editions across the years of this humble book, all of it or of the separately published parts of it, continue to be worth having at hand.

Music Lovers' Encyclopedia
Music Lovers' Encyclopedia
by Rupert Hughes
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars This Is One of Those Venerably Old Music Lexicography Tools That Retains Some Usefulness, Feb. 16 2013
The main reason that any practising musician or other music professional of any real sophistication would continue to use this venerable old handbook and dictionary, frequently reissued over the last (20th) century, is for the sake of its biographical section. An edition of this enchiridion from the early 1950s is the one which I used as a young music student from early adolescence onwards; later in life I acquired also one of the earlier editions or printings (dated 1912 with "Cyclopedia" as the third word in the title proper). There are numerous other such seemingly superannuated music dictionaries (especially in German and in English), and this one is not even among the very best of suchlike (if one were to make comparisons of it, for example, with similar works, such items as, among them, "Baltzell's Dictionary of Musicians" or back editions of "Kürschners Deutscher Musiker-Kalender"), but it remains useful, as others of the kind do for much the same reasons, and, unlike many such others which are even more desirable to track down for purchase than Rupert Hughes' compendium happens to be, his work is relatively easy to find for sale, usually inexpensively, in used book stores in the Dominion of Canada and in the U. S. of A.

The entries in the biographical section (which endures as the portion of Rupert Hughes' handbook the most abidingly of interest) are rather perfunctory, succinct, and usually accurate, but that part of the guide, happily, includes the names of many minor composers, musical editors, performers, once widely respected (but now largely forgotten) pedagogues, and others, especially of the 18th and 19th centureis, for whom one seldom encounters entries in later music biographical or general music dictionaries and cyclopaedias. For tracking down such musical "lesser luminaries", even if one might wish that more more ample information about them were included, at least what the modest entries provide makes for a good departure point for learning, at the very least, the "bare essentials" (dates and so forth) about these figures, and often a bit more as well.

As for musical terminology, which is in another alphabetically arranged section of Rupert Hughes' handbook, one really should acquire a later, more scholarly work, such as any edition of the Harvard Dictionary of Music; even a concise (abridged) paperback edition of that work will suffice a student, most of the time, up to and through the first two years of college, university, or conservatory studies. For his part, Hughes, at least, does not get things so wrong as similar works by many popularisers of his kind, then or now, sometimes do. The miscellaneous articles that make up the balance of the volume, even if of lesser significance, are welcome, in some cases even of lasting value. The various editions across the years of this humble book, all of it or of the separately published parts of it, continue to be worth having at hand.

Boy & His Dog [Import]
Boy & His Dog [Import]
DVD ~ Don Johnson
Offered by Now Showing DVD's
Price: CDN$ 11.19
10 used & new from CDN$ 11.18

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Lad Will Do and Will Provide ANYTHING That His Dawg Desires, Requires, Demands, Asks!, Feb. 3 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Boy & His Dog [Import] (DVD)
This film is wonderfully goofy, strange, and sexy; the DVVD edition that I have is on the Slingshot label (release number SDVD-9818, as available in the Dominion of Canada and in the U. S. of A.). As in all of Don Johnson's earliest films (his more frequently buttocks- and bollocks-baring "The Magic Garden of Stanley Sweetheart" and "The Harrad Experiment", especially), this actor, in appearance and personality, was winsomely, alluringly cute, and enticingly sensuous in bearing. Johnson's occasional nudity, or, more frequently, his near- or partial-nakedness in this film, amply show off such elegantly youthful assets, as then usual in his burgeoning cinematic career. Johnson's spunky manner was delightfully insouciant and irresistably, potently sexy. He really has been the main reason, over the years, for continuing to want to see and to treasure this peculiar movie.

The film gets rather grim at some points, but the surrealism of it all makes the viewer laugh as well as squirm a bit. Don Johnson did not flinch at anything that his scripts might demand at this early stage of his life in film; it helped that one of his assets was being so naturally exhibitionistic and playful by nature, revelling in his own boyish beauty and lithe atheleticism.

As for young Vic's canine companion and tutor, named Blood, whose pet-human, hunting boy, and pupil Vic happens to be, that wily and domineering animal is shaggy and, not surprisingly, his dawggy lips don't move with his dialogue. Not to worry. It's a telephathic kind of thing!

Jason Robards is weird and theatening, just the right guy for one of the villains in the film's post-nuclear underworld.

As science-fiction films go, this one is very original and offbeat! I cannot see this film often enough, and you might find that viewing it becomes addictive, too!

Funk & Wagnalls Canadian college dictionary
Funk & Wagnalls Canadian college dictionary
by Avis W S
Edition: Hardcover
2 used & new from CDN$ 136.89

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Choice among University-Level Dictionaries, but Not One That Has Much Specifically Canadian To Recommend It, Jan. 29 2013
Those seeking a dictionary of Canadian English should look elsewhere, even if, at one time, this one had served as the standard for writing at such a great institution as the University of Western Ontario. The grand old, even if somewhat dowdy, Funk and Wagnalls dictionaries are quite conservative about American usage, and admirably comprehensive, too, in vocabulary covered, apart from slang and informal usage (some of which has been present, but in too little quantity and insufficiently up-to-date), but in its supposedly Canadian dressing, this dictionary is too weak and inconsistent about Canadian spelling, usage, and pronunciation to live up to its title's pretensions. Neither in 1978, nor in printings or editions of the 1980s and since then, is what one finds on the pages between this good, but not very specifically "Canadian" dictionary's outer covers, really very Canadian. That is not to say, however, that it is a poor dictionary; it just is not very Canadian!

Those seeking a truly and more thoroughly Canadian dictionary, for usage, unusual (for Americans) words, pronunciations, and so forth, ought to try one of the various editions of the "Gage Canadian Dictionary", or perhaps "The Canadian Oxford Dictionary", in the full or the compacted form of either of the complete dictionary's first and second editions, which the Oxford University Press publishes; it is Gage's Canadian dictionary which is the one that I prefer; Gage Publishing itself is an affiliate of the Oxford University Press Canada. An admirable Canadian usage dictionary, despite a few of its own shortcomings, is the under-appreciated "The Penguin Canadian Dictionary", which Thomas Manuel Paikeday, the distinguished India-born lexicographer, edited marvellously well, as Paikeday earlier had undertaken expertly his modestly produced 1970 paperback (copyrighted again in 1976) "Compact Dictionary of Canadian English" (published by Holt, Rinehard, and Winston of Canada), which Paikeday adapted from his pathbreaking "Winston Dictionary of Canadian English" of 1969. All three of these dictionaries by Paikeday, however, have too little vocabulary seriously to rival the other two dictionaries mentioned here for general use while reading at a sophisticated level, but Paikeday's works are excellent for determining what truly is specifically Canadian usage and they feature some refreshingly new devices and helpful approaches which have made Paikeday's dictionaries very "user-friendly". Between them, these five dictionaries cited here are among those which best have rethought what constitutes Canadian English, unlike so many other putatively Canadian editions of dictionaries adapted, but much too superficially, from those current in the U. S. of A. or in the U.K.

Funk & Wagnalls Canadian college dictionary
Funk & Wagnalls Canadian college dictionary
by Walter Avis
Edition: Hardcover
4 used & new from CDN$ 84.84

4.0 out of 5 stars A Good and Useful University-Level Dictionary, but There Is Really Rather Little That Is Specifically Canadian about It, Jan. 29 2013
Those seeking a dictionary of Canadian English should look elsewhere, even if, at one time, this one had served as the standard for writing at such a great institution as the University of Western Ontario. The grand old, even if somewhat dowdy, Funk and Wagnalls dictionaries are quite conservative about American usage, and admirably comprehensive, too, in vocabulary covered, apart from slang and informal usage (some of which has been present, but in too little quantity and insufficiently up-to-date), but in its supposedly Canadian dressing, this dictionary is too weak and inconsistent about Canadian spelling, usage, and pronunciation to live up to its title's pretensions. Neither in 1978, nor in printings or editions of the 1980s and since then, is what one finds on the pages between this good, but not very specifically "Canadian" dictionary's outer covers, really very Canadian. That is not to say, however, that it is a poor dictionary; it just is not very Canadian!

Those seeking a truly and more thoroughly Canadian dictionary, for usage, unusual (for Americans) words, pronunciations, and so forth, ought to try one of the various editions of the "Gage Canadian Dictionary", or perhaps "The Canadian Oxford Dictionary", in the full or the compacted form of either of the complete dictionary's first and second editions, which the Oxford University Press publishes; it is Gage's Canadian dictionary which is the one that I prefer; Gage Publishing itself is an affiliate of the Oxford University Press Canada. An admirable Canadian usage dictionary, despite a few of its own shortcomings, is the under-appreciated "The Penguin Canadian Dictionary", which Thomas Manuel Paikeday, the distinguished India-born lexicographer, edited marvellously well, as Paikeday earlier had undertaken expertly his modestly produced 1970 paperback (copyrighted again in 1976) "Compact Dictionary of Canadian English" (published by Holt, Rinehard, and Winston of Canada), which Paikeday adapted from his pathbreaking "Winston Dictionary of Canadian English" of 1969. All three of these dictionaries by Paikeday, however, have too little vocabulary seriously to rival the other two dictionaries mentioned here for general use while reading at a sophisticated level, but Paikeday's works are excellent for determining what truly is specifically Canadian usage and they feature some refreshingly new devices and helpful approaches which have made Paikeday's dictionaries very "user-friendly". Between them, these five dictionaries cited here are among those which best have rethought what constitutes Canadian English, unlike so many other putatively Canadian editions of dictionaries adapted, but much too superficially, from those current in the U. S. of A. or in the U.K.

Funk And Wagnalls Standard Dictionary
Funk And Wagnalls Standard Dictionary
by And Funk
Edition: Paperback
4 used & new from CDN$ 4.59

5.0 out of 5 stars Compact, Well Edited, & Large Vocabulary Handled, This Paperback Dictionary Wins 1st Place for Usefulness & Comprehensiveness!, Jan. 27 2013
I have used various editions of Funk and Wagnalls' hardback and paperback dictionaries for many, many years, indeed, for most of, firstly, my adolescence, and, then, my adult life (my present age getting close to 70 years long now!). However, I have made resort to the large Standard and College editions in hardback binding of this trusty dictionary less and less frequently in recent decades; Funk and Wagnalls, while of sterling reliability due to its conservative (so far, I think, I hope, to the present!) approach to lexicography, can be just a tad too stodgy for primary reference: too little slang, just a bit too unbending in some ways. Since the 1980s or so, my preference for the Webster's "New World" college editions in a single hardback volume (always my favourite, anyway, in each and every one of its four major editions thus far), and, to a lesser extent, the American Heritage full and college editions in hardback, finally have usurped the place that Funk and Wagnalls once had for me.

Of course, living in Québec, within the Canadian context, I also use the Chambers, Cassells, and Gage dictionaries of English quite extensively, since American spelling and pronunciation (which, of course, prevail in the dictionaries of Funk and Wagnall, American Heritage, and in any Webster) are not sufficiently close to Commonwealth and Canadian usage. However, I utilise these British and Canadian dictionaries, in fact, mostly for just that, spelling (especially Chambers) and pronunciation (Gage above all), as well, of course, for words and uses that American English does not represent, while I nonetheless prefer the Webster "New World" and American Heritage hardback editions for definitions, usage levels, and etymology. I only add that I am an avid user of dictionaries and make resort to a very wide variety of other dictionaries besides those which I discuss here!

What makes the case different in evaluating single volume paperback dictionaries is that Funk and Wagnalls simply packs the most vocabulary into a compact volume (fatter than most paperback books, dictionaries or otherwise, but still very portable and economical of space needed to keep it at hand and also reasonably legible without undue eye strain) than any other widely published and distributed softcover dictionary. The paperback dictionary editions deriving from the Webster's "New World" and American Heritage Dictionaries are yet more beautifully edited in their compact paperback formats as, of course, they are in hardback editions, but they just do not include a wide enough vocabulary base to suffice verification needs when reading fairly sophisticated book and periodical literature. (This is so despite the fact that their hardback sister editions, of course, are magnificent in those regards!) Another widely-found and very comprehensive paperback dictionary is Scribner-Bantam's (which comes in single volume and in two-volume alternatives, both compact), but the Scribner-Bantam's paperback dictionary sacrifices some features of a full dictionary which Funk and Wagnalls paperback editions manage to retain, so, due to that, Scribner-Bantam's just does not quite measure up to the same standard that Funk and Wagnalls sets.

When I read in a room in which I seldom or never would study, or "on the hoof" from one place to another, it will remain the Funk and Wagnalls paperback dictionary that has my user allegiance!

The Scribner-Bantam English Dictionary
The Scribner-Bantam English Dictionary

5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the Alternatives to the Even Better Funk & Wagnalls Paperback Dictionary Alike for Comprehensiveness & Editorial Quality, Jan. 22 2013
This is one paperback dictionary of American English that I actually do use regularly. I prefer the comparable Funk and Wagnalls Standard dictionary in paperback to this one, of basically the same size and heft, but the Scribner-Bantam dictionary in softcover edition usually meets my requirements about as well. Both of these mass-marketed paperbacks provide a maximum of vocabulary coverage compatible with such a compact format as well as good definitions and U.S. pronunciations. What the Funk & Wagnalls Standard paperback dictionary (see my review of it for more detail) has over Scribner-Bantam is the presence, to a greater extent and more consistently, in the former, of etymologies and other, further developed ancillary functions that one usually finds only in hardback dictionaries. I use the Bantam-Scribner's all the more in that I do not have enough copies of the Funk & Wagnalls paperback to keep at hand in rooms where I occasionally read. Of course, near my computer, desk, and dining table I keep my favourite hardback dictionaries of greater scope, i.e. Webster's New World Dictionary (College Edition), American Heritage Dictionary (complete and college editions), and various editions of Chambers' Dictionary (for Commonwealth spelling and usage) and Gage Canadian Dictionary (for our Québec and Canadian English usage, especially for pronunciations).

Anyone who needs more than the good but less extensive paperback editions which derive from the best of the college and desk-reference dictionaries, which are more beautifully edited in some cases (e.g., American Heritage dictionary in paperback) but which simply are lacking in sufficiently broad vocabulary coverage, should consider acquiring either the Funk & Wagnalls or Scribner-Bantam paperback dictionaries for use when such a portable dictionary as either of these is more practical (as when travelling) than a full-length college or desk reference edition, too cumbersome, would be to keep at hand. This Scribner-Bantam thus edited, incidentally, comes in single volume and two-volume alternatives.

Scribner-Bantam English Dictionary
Scribner-Bantam English Dictionary
by Edwin B. Williams
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: CDN$ 8.54
30 used & new from CDN$ 0.17

5.0 out of 5 stars Next-Best Paperback Dictionary of American English, a Viable Alternative to Funk & Wagnalls' Equally Compact & Comprehensive One, Jan. 22 2013
This is one paperback dictionary of American English that I actually do use regularly. I prefer the comparable Funk and Wagnalls Standard dictionary in paperback to this one, of basically the same size and heft, but the Scribner-Bantam dictionary in softcover edition usually meets my requirements about as well. Both of these mass-marketed paperbacks provide a maximum of vocabulary coverage compatible with such a compact format as well as good definitions and U.S. pronunciations. What the Funk & Wagnalls Standard paperback dictionary (see my review of it for more detail) has over Scribner-Bantam is the presence, to a greater extent and more consistently, in the former, of etymologies and other, further developed ancillary functions that one usually finds only in hardback dictionaries. I use the Bantam-Scribner's all the more in that I do not have enough copies of the Funk & Wagnalls paperback to keep at hand in rooms where I occasionally read. Of course, near my computer, desk, and dining table I keep my favourite hardback dictionaries of greater scope, i.e. Webster's New World Dictionary (College Edition), American Heritage Dictionary (complete and college editions), and various editions of Chambers' Dictionary (for Commonwealth spelling and usage) and Gage Canadian Dictionary (for our Québec and Canadian English usage, especially for pronunciations).

Anyone who needs more than the good but less extensive paperback editions which derive from the best of the college and desk-reference dictionaries, which are more beautifully edited in some cases (e.g., American Heritage dictionary in paperback) but which simply are lacking in sufficiently broad vocabulary coverage, should consider acquiring either the Funk & Wagnalls or Scribner-Bantam paperback dictionaries for use when such a portable dictionary as either of these is more practical (as when travelling) than a full-length college or desk reference edition, too cumbersome, would be to keep at hand. This Scribner-Bantam thus edited, incidentally, comes in single volume and two-volume alternatives.

Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary: Revised and Updated
Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary: Revised and Updated
by Peter Funk
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
23 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars The F&W Paperback Dictionary Remains the Most Comprehensive of Well Edited Compact Dictionaries of American-Usage English, Jan. 22 2013
I have used various editions of Funk and Wagnalls' hardback and paperback dictionaries for many, many years, indeed, for most of, firstly, my adolescence, and, then, my adult life (my present age getting close to 70 years long now!). However, I have made resort to the large Standard and College editions in hardback binding of this trusty dictionary less and less frequently in recent decades; Funk and Wagnalls, while of sterling reliability due to its conservative (so far, I think, I hope, to the present!) approach to lexicography, can be just a tad too stodgy for primary reference: too little slang, just a bit too unbending in some ways. Since the 1980s or so, my preference for the Webster's "New World" college editions in a single hardback volume (always my favourite, anyway, in each and every one of its four major editions thus far), and, to a lesser extent, the American Heritage full and college editions in hardback, finally have usurped the place that Funk and Wagnalls once had for me.

Of course, living in Québec, within the Canadian context, I also use the Chambers, Cassells, and Gage dictionaries of English quite extensively, since American spelling and pronunciation (which, of course, prevail in the dictionaries of Funk and Wagnall, American Heritage, and in any Webster) are not sufficiently close to Commonwealth and Canadian usage. However, I utilise these British and Canadian dictionaries, in fact, mostly for just that, spelling (especially Chambers) and pronunciation (Gage above all), as well, of course, for words and uses that American English does not represent, while I nonetheless prefer the Webster "New World" and American Heritage hardback editions for definitions, usage levels, and etymology. I only add that I am an avid user of dictionaries and make resort to a very wide variety of other dictionaries besides those which I discuss here!

What makes the case different in evaluating single volume paperback dictionaries is that Funk and Wagnalls simply packs the most vocabulary into a compact volume (fatter than most paperback books, dictionaries or otherwise, but still very portable and economical of space needed to keep it at hand and also reasonably legible without undue eye strain) than any other widely published and distributed softcover dictionary. The paperback dictionary editions deriving from the Webster's "New World" and American Heritage Dictionaries are yet more beautifully edited in their compact paperback formats as, of course, they are in hardback editions, but they just do not include a wide enough vocabulary base to suffice verification needs when reading fairly sophisticated book and periodical literature. (This is so despite the fact that their hardback sister editions, of course, are magnificent in those regards!) Another widely-found and very comprehensive paperback dictionary is Scribner-Bantam's (which comes in single volume and in two-volume alternatives, both compact), but the Scribner-Bantam's paperback dictionary sacrifices some features of a full dictionary which Funk and Wagnalls paperback editions manage to retain, so, due to that, Scribner-Bantam's just does not quite measure up to the same standard that Funk and Wagnalls sets.

When I read in a room in which I seldom or never would study, or "on the hoof" from one place to another, it will remain the Funk and Wagnalls paperback dictionary that has my user allegiance!

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