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Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada)
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Appartenir Au Destin
Appartenir Au Destin
Offered by Musique du Faubourg
Price: CDN$ 8.99
3 used & new from CDN$ 8.98

4.0 out of 5 stars A Pleasant Discovery of a Talent That Bears Further Watching, Feb. 9 2016
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Appartenir Au Destin (Audio CD)
This is a very pleasant CD to discover. Jonathan Mercier (not to confuse with the famous Swiss hockey player of the same name) was in 2007, the year of the copyright statement for "Appartenir au destin", a young and quite handsome (in the cute/macho sort of way) French-Canadian pop singer, presumably Québecois, of a tenorish, pleasing voice and good musicianship. The pleasant music of the songs, gratefully unpretentious and of solid melodic quality, is of his own composition and in some cases he wrote or co-wrote the words (in French) also.

Jonathan Mercier bears watching, if his musical career really still be an active one; his blog rather appears to be rather inactive (or perhaps simply one that is too undeveloped). New, sealed copies of "Appartenir au destin" still are available from Amazon-Canada at the time of writing this review, early 2016. If ever a music video of him comes my way, for sure I shall view it. I like Mercier enough to have placed, at least for now, a poster of him (the same image on the front packaging of the CD) on a wall in my home. An enjoyable release his CD surely is.

Leningrad Symphony
Leningrad Symphony
Offered by USA CD SELLER
Price: CDN$ 62.55
7 used & new from CDN$ 11.07

2.0 out of 5 stars Hideously Ugly, Brutal Performance, in Turgic Sound, of a Symphony That Requires More Loving Understanding, Jan. 28 2016
This review is from: Leningrad Symphony (Audio CD)
Some recordings have historical importance as curios due to circumstances of various kinds that do not necessarily carry much specifically musical value, given the product that resulted. That is the case with this dreadful racket of a misperformance of Shostakovich's Seventh ("Leningrad") Symphony. I sure have vivid memories of the transition from knowing the work in this, William Steinberg's pioneering but utterly banal 78 r.p.m. record set and Leonard Bernstein's revelatory recording with the N.Y.P.O. As 19-years-old sailor in 1963, another dude, a grubby, pimply, odourous, and obnoxious fellow sailor, had that bulky Steinberg 78s set (long after it was "cool" to play discs of that older format a decade and an half after the advent of 33.3 rpm. and 45 rpm. microgroove discs, the more so for a performance so mediocre and of quality so blaring and blasting, like an hydroelectric dam being dynamited in "low fidelity"!) and he played the set over and over and over again in the barracks. Everybody (most of us, in our common situation, were musically inclined and trained) just came to detest the work. Steinberg and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra seemed to do everything to emphasise all the worst in this symphony: utter, noisy bombast and claptrap.

Years later someone insisted that I reacquaint myself with the Seventh. I suspect that Seinberg, so hopelessly Germanic in musical termperament, just was not the right man to conduct this very Slavic work, however ardently Shostakovich echoed his own anti-Nazi zeal and portrayed his adoptive countrymen's wartime joint national effort in harness with the U.S.S.R. (and, of course, Britain and its Empire). His Allied-patriotism in doing so makes the work to sound, in part rather ironically (and a lot, indeed too much, of the time), like Nazi military music of the most aggreesive kind that people tend to imagine (real German military music being, actually, surprisingly fine musical stuff). The tubby sonics of the 1945 recording of such a tub-thumping performance did not help at all, in a work that needed more vivid sound recording quality than what the Musicraft label (the original company that put out those ghastly 78s) could provide, something which the R.C.A. sound engineers for Koussevitzky's or the European team behind Mengelberg's late recordings of the same years could have managed, but not Musicraft's team. I got the Bernstein recording of this symphony, heard it, entirely amazed (and pleased with the music). Now the work sounded like the masterpiece of emotion, sensibility, and epic structure that it is.

Seldom have I had such a transformation of the estimation of any musical work as that. When and if I get around to hearing Vasily Petrenko's and some other conductors lead this music in more recent recordings, it is likely to remain Leonard Bernstein's N.Y.PO. bout with the Leningrad Symphony who will be the measure of success in knowing whether the young men grasp just to what this music can amount. Before buying this CD reissue of William Steinberg and his symphonic buffalos savagely stampede Shostakovich, sample it on YouTube. Stand forewarned!

Symphony 7
Symphony 7
Offered by langton_distribution
Price: CDN$ 46.15
7 used & new from CDN$ 46.15

2.0 out of 5 stars Like Armies of Mega-Belching Brutes During the Thunderous Collapse of an Hydroelectric Dam, and in "Low Fidelity", at That!, Jan. 28 2016
This review is from: Symphony 7 (Audio CD)
Some recordings have historical importance as curios due to circumstances of various kinds that do not necessarily carry much specifically musical value, given the product that resulted. That is the case with this dreadful racket of a misperformance of Shostakovich's Seventh ("Leningrad") Symphony. I sure have vivid memories of the transition from knowing the work in this, William Steinberg's pioneering but utterly banal 78 r.p.m. record set and Leonard Bernstein's revelatory recording with the N.Y.P.O. As 19-years-old sailor in 1963, another dude, a grubby, pimply, odourous, and obnoxious fellow sailor, had that bulky Steinberg 78s set (long after it was "cool" to play discs of that older format a decade and an half after the advent of 33.3 rpm. and 45 rpm. microgroove discs, the more so for a performance so mediocre and of quality so blaring and blasting, like an hydroelectric dam being dynamited in "low fidelity"!) and he played the set over and over and over again in the barracks. Everybody (most of us, in our common situation, were musically inclined and trained) just came to detest the work. Steinberg and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra seemed to do everything to emphasise all the worst in this symphony: utter, noisy bombast and claptrap.

Years later someone insisted that I reacquaint myself with the Seventh. I suspect that Seinberg, so hopelessly Germanic in musical termperament, just was not the right man to conduct this very Slavic work, however ardently Shostakovich echoed his own anti-Nazi zeal and portrayed his adoptive countrymen's wartime joint national effort in harness with the U.S.S.R. (and, of course, Britain and its Empire). His Allied-patriotism in doing so makes the work to sound, in part rather ironically (and a lot, indeed too much, of the time), like Nazi military music of the most aggreesive kind that people tend to imagine (real German military music being, actually, surprisingly fine musical stuff). The tubby sonics of the 1945 recording of such a tub-thumping performance did not help at all, in a work that needed more vivid sound recording quality than what the Musicraft label (the original company that put out those ghastly 78s) could provide, something which the R.C.A. sound engineers for Koussevitzky's or the European team behind Mengelberg's late recordings of the same years could have managed, but not Musicraft's team. I got the Bernstein recording of this symphony, heard it, entirely amazed (and pleased with the music). Now the work sounded like the masterpiece of emotion, sensibility, and epic structure that it is.

Seldom have I had such a transformation of the estimation of any musical work as that. When and if I get around to hearing Vasily Petrenko's and some other conductors lead this music in more recent recordings, it is likely to remain Leonard Bernstein's N.Y.PO. bout with the Leningrad Symphony who will be the measure of success in knowing whether the young men grasp just to what this music can amount. Before buying this CD reissue of William Steinberg and his symphonic buffalos savagely stampede Shostakovich, sample it on YouTube. Stand forewarned!

Brotherhood of Justice [Import]
Brotherhood of Justice [Import]
DVD ~ Keanu Reeves
Offered by thebookcommunity_ca
Price: CDN$ 40.24
12 used & new from CDN$ 4.60

3.0 out of 5 stars Sweet Keanu Reeves in the Flush of Youthful Beauty and Charm, in a 1980s Teen Drama Well Produced and Still Worth Viewing, Dec 28 2015
"Brotherhood of Justice" has been noted for some star billing among its cast and with good reason: it features two celebrities, Kiefer Sutherland and, more significantly, Keanu Reeves, the latter of whom is an actor who has attained major star status, together in the cast in one of one of Keanu's earliest movies. This "made-for-television" movie is about some high-school football jocks who decide to form a vigilante brigade to maintain good order and to reduce vandalism on their school's campus. This film is one put out on a relatively low-budget but which is fully professionally produced and carefully edited. Among other good things, the film image quality beautifully conveys the lovely natural and suburban scenery of Northern California. Obviously, teens are too young and immature for the kind of social intervention which they attempt, which, unsurprisingly, turns out badly, and which is the kind of thing that often goes awry even when adults get involved in such antics.

Keanu Reeves turned twenty-two in 1986, the year of release for "Brotherhood of Justice", but he looks very much the adolescent, so fresh-faced, beautifully boyish, and utterly nubile and appealing, as, indeed, he would continue to look for about another decade of his life, well into, chronologically, handsome early middle-age. The casting, of Keanu Reeves, Kiefer Sutherland, and of the other young actors, works well since the film's script does not probe depths of emotion, motivation, or of psychology which in any way would overtax the skills of young actors beginning to make their way in cinema. Overall, "Brotherhood of Justice" makes for enjoyable viewing, whether only once or, on DVD, more frequently than that.

BROTHERHOOD OF JUSTICE [Import]
BROTHERHOOD OF JUSTICE [Import]
Price: CDN$ 9.99
14 used & new from CDN$ 6.24

3.0 out of 5 stars Two Worthwhile Movies out of Five Is Reason Enough to Make This Set of Five a Decent Bargain with a Low Price Tag on It, Dec 26 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Two of the five movies in this grab-bag selection of low and (and very-low) budget films are enjoyable enough. The full array of these motion pictures are "Brotherhood of Justice", "Nightmare at Battercreek", "South Bronx Heroes", "Spenser: Pale Kings and Princes", and "Terminal Rush", making for a mixed assortment of crime, disaster-crime, and action films, plus the two films which are not in any of those genres and which, partly because of that, are the stand-outs, namely the first- and third-listed of them.

"Brotherhood of Justice" receives the star billing and with good reason: it has a true celebrity, Keanu Reeves, in the cast in one of his earliest movies (this one "made-for-television"), about some high-school football jocks who decide to form a vigilante brigade to maintain order and to reduce vandalism on their school's campus. This is the only film of the five which is relatively low-budget but also truly well and fully professionally produced and carefully edited. Among other good things, the film image quality beautifully conveys the lovely natural and suburban scenery of Northern California. Obviously, teens are too young and immature for the kind of social intervention which they attempt, which, unsurprisingly, turns out badly, and which is the kind of thing that often goes awry even when adults get involved in such antics.

Keanu Reeves turned twenty-two in 1986, the year of release for "Brotherhood of Justice", but he looks very much the adolescent, so fresh-faced, beautifully boyish, and utterly nubile and appealing, as, indeed, he would continue to look for about another decade of his life, well into, chronologically, handsome early middle-age. The visual presentation of this edition of the film is misleading, portraying Keanu as photographed at ca. forty-something and posing as either an adult criminal or crime-buster. It's a nice photo, though, however inappropriate for the film's more youthful Keanu-content. The casting, of Keanu Reeves and of the other young actors, works well since the film's script does not probe depths of emotion, motivation, or of psychology which in any way would overtax the skills of young actors beginning to make their way in cinema.

The only other film of interest to this viewer (caring little for the crime/thriller sort of cinematic fare that the movies constitute over which this review passes in silence) is "South Bronx Heroes". The subject matter even nowadays (perhaps especially in recent decades, for that matter) is child pornography, the exploitation of alike young and pubescent children, both boys and girls, for photographic sex trade. There is, thankfully, no explicit depiction of juvenile nudity, but that is really about what the film deals. Taking place mostly in an exceedingly bleak urban setting, the little boy at the beginning of the film, the eleven-years-old girl, and fourteen-years-old boy are all cute kids who act out the drama of their exploitation very capably for their respective ages. As for the adults, they pass the grade in their parts also, even if their acting tends to be rather brittle in character.

The story of "South Bronx Heroes" and how it comes across onscreen is often very quirky and exudes what is supposed to pass for 1980s "hip" agreeably enough (looking, though, more like something from the previous decade). Less suitably, the action is a bit too episodic to make following the story an easy feat for much of the time. Resort to IMDb's very brief description of the action helped to gain bearings to understand what was taking place early in the film; the remainder, with some effort, could be figured out unaided well enough. The images on the screen in "South Bronx Heroes" are bleary, lacking in clear focus, although whether that is due to the film itself or to the DVD's source material for it, and editing (if any) thereof, this reviewer cannot attest.

In this economy-oriented release (Echo Bridge Home Entertainment 34644 being the North American edition viewed) there are no extras with the various films and no subtitles, either, for any of them. The DVD is worth it for fans of Keanu Reeves, many of whom, however, may tend to purchase an edition of "Brotherhood of Justice" alone, without the additional mediocre cinematic works found on Echo Bridge's DVD.

Nutcracker [Import]
Nutcracker [Import]
DVD ~ Edward Villella
Offered by importcds__
Price: CDN$ 17.15
16 used & new from CDN$ 17.13

4.0 out of 5 stars For Edward Villella's Sake, This DVD of Shortened "Nutcracker" Is a Ballet Peformance That All Who Love Classical Dance Must See, Dec 14 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Nutcracker [Import] (DVD)
Edward Villella was one of the finest of all American-born ballet dancers; he was, for that matter, one of the world's greatest male ballet dancers PERIOD. Alas, there are not many full-length performances to see of Villella in his prime, which makes this DVD of a televised production of a very foreshortened "Nutcracker" (Warner Bro[ther]s Home Video, in the "W[arner] B[rothers] Archive Collection" being the North American edition viewed), musically and balletically speaking, to be all the more desirable. The entire cast, really, is wonderful, giving some idea of how exciting it must have been seeing such great dancers, night after night, dance for Ballanchine's company, the New York City Ballet. However, Ballanchine's staged productions did not play so fast-and-loose with the scores as this televised production had to do, to stay within TV time limits. Also, the scenery looks mostly like fancy wallpaper and gift wrapping, albeit the charming family scenes are more than suchlike. That said, the upper middle class household looks like one a bit more turn-of-the century (i.e. from 19th into 20th) American in, say, towns like Kokomo or Peru, Indiana, than one from E. T. A. Hoffman's Germany or from the Tsarist Russia of P. I. Tchaikovsky's and Lev Ivanov's own milieu.

Still, in the midst of all this, when narrator Eddie Albert ceases yakking over the music, there is, above all, the sublime Edward Villella, dancing in all of his youthful glory. So decorously costumed, the man's physical beauty is not made so much of as one can see in the numerous YouTube videos of other ballet productions that can be found available nowadays. Boyishly graceful and athletic, he looked during his dancing career like every high school girl's "dream Italian boyfriend". It would have been great to see him battle the mice, in a narratively important scene (among so many others) in the ballet's story that could not be fit into the television time framework, but his lyrically gorgeous solos and duos (in terms of movement as well as music) of the greatest importance are present here.

Villella's incredible leaps, so smooth and seemingly effortless (and, man! so high!) are breathtaking, even compared to those of the likes of Baryshnikov or Nureyev. Villella's virtuosity in this regard is redolent of high-jumping Yuri Soloviev, just about the greatest of all leapers in ballet (of whom, alas, there is so painfully little audiovisual documentation, although the archives of Russian television surely must include much). The manner in which Villella seems to hover in the air, totally in control of everything, is astonishing; indeed, his descent, when it comes, conveys the illusion of an artistically motivated decision at that particular moment to come down rather than merely the reality of a mortal's capitulation, some unwilling submission, to the force that gravity inexorably exerts. Villella's absolute technical control at all times and in every aspect of his dancing astounds.

The Budapest orchestra, under the expert musical direction of Franz Allers (so well known to American ballet and musical theatre audiences), plays well enough, despite things like the most strangely clangourous celeste (attributable to the instrument rather than to the player) that one is likely to encounter. A collector, obviously, needs to own a production of the ballet on video that is truly complete (or reasonably so), for the sake alike of all of Tchaikovsky's great music and of how it has been choreographed and of how, further, it is danced, this work being, after all, one of the very most popular ballets in the entire repertory. Only in so doing can he make a primary choice to represent "The Nutcracker" ("Casse noisette") adequately in his collection. Nonetheless, this delightful television adaptation of it is very much worthwhile to have as a supplement to one of the many great complete DVD editions of it.

Spartacus [Import]
Spartacus [Import]
Price: CDN$ 9.30
3 used & new from CDN$ 9.29

4.0 out of 5 stars Not Enough Restoration Attempted for This Early Silent Masterpiece, but Even in This State, "Spartacus" (1913) Satisfies To View, Nov. 18 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Spartacus [Import] (DVD)
Five stars for a brilliant and, doubtless, must have been expensive production from among early film-lore of the era of silent motion pictures, only four stars, however, for quality as processed for DVD. Martin R. Kealey's praise regarding "Spartaco" ("Spartacus") as a cinematic work, in his comments for Amazon-U.S., are justified. So are his comments about the lack of historical credibility in any real detail vis-à-vis whatever that we know from the mists of antiquity -- admittedly not a lot -- about Spartacus, the gladiatorial slave rebel of the Roman Empire. In this 1913 film the action takes place nearly entirely in Rome, avoiding many changes of scenic milieu, apart from the Vesuvian retreat to which the slaves have holed themselves up at one point.

There is a lot of intrigue, romantic liaisons between slaves and the upper Roman class, lions to which to feed Spartacus after his capture (but which end up devouring his rival instead), the virtuous gladiator having been blamed wrongly for a patrician's murder, and so on and on, romantically free treatment, indeed, of an historical subject rather in the manner that 18th or 19th century opera librettists would have handled things. Leave it to film reference sources to handle details of the film's cast, plot, etc., rather than to belabour them here. In terms of any genuine history about Rome or Spartacus himself and the slaves, about the movement freely of lower and upper classes intermingling among each other, as depicted in the 1913 movie, it all strains credulity badly enough, it hardly needs bearing to state.

This edition of the film, without any bonus features, which would have been desirable to provide for an item of this cinematic antiquity, has used only a fairly decent copy (or copies) of the movie, not much enhanced with any sophiscated image-processing, from which to produce the DVD (Alpha Home Entertainment ALP-7508 as available on the North American market). However, Alpha's edition does include far more footage of the motion picture than what is available of it on some Web sites that can furnish downloads, but which offer less of the movie's footage than Alpha Home Entertainment supplies, making the DVD an important resource, although yet other download Web site(s) claim to offer still more of "Spartaco" than Alpha does so. (A pal, going by pseud., "Spartapups", pointed this out.)

In other respects, too, although making a good start at it, this is not the kind of film restoration that ultimately such a masterful cinematic work of its era fully would merit. The lighting varies probably even more than the original would have done so on screen; the images frequently are scratched; and the black and white contrast is not what could be achieved if more archival restoration effort had been expended upon the work. At least the reel speed has been gauged well and thus there are not the kind of quick, jerky movements that defile so many other silent films as made available for latter-day audiences; this one displays as much natural movement as one rightly would expect of a commercial film, even of that remote era of movie-making.

The pantomime that constitutes silent film acting is redolent of opera or ballet (that is, gestures common to both, not, of course, the latter genre's fancy footwork), as then was considered to be suitable to a serious, histrionic work of this nature, thus making comments on acting ability, for a movie that scarcely attempts to convey the like, to be rather beside the point. The actors, several of the men impressively handsome, the women quite pretty, are suitably noble, brave, sweet, venile, craven, and so forth, according to their respective characters. For those who do not dismiss out-of-hand the "low tech" (by later standards) of silent film, the 1913 "Spartaco" ("Spartacus" as presented in North America) is a curiosity-satisfying and, really, quite enjoyable film for its time.

The Falls: Testament of Love by Breaking Glass Pictures, QC Cinema
The Falls: Testament of Love by Breaking Glass Pictures, QC Cinema
DVD ~ Jon Garcia
Offered by JnP Store Canada
Price: CDN$ 29.76

3.0 out of 5 stars Five Years of Lonely Separation Precedes Reunion of These Former Mormon Missionaries before Renewing Their Gay Romantic Liaison, Nov. 18 2015
The concept of this film is better than its realisation. "The Falls: Testament of Love" is about two gay/bisexual L.D.S. Mormons, who had been missionary companions, together having an homosexual love affair on their mission, who were dismissed, who enjoyed a leisurely amourous gay roadtrip before parting seemingly for good, and who now reunite five years later. The premise of sexual ardour reignited, love coming out of remission, and how that impacts the life of the one of the two young men who has married, is the stuff of a first-rate romantic epic. However, as good as the concept is, the slow pacing and languid timing of this plodding video-movie is anything but adequately cinematic. Truly banal, inept dialogue does not help things along one little bit. The acting per se, for all of that, mostly is quite fine, however numerous the faults of the script and direction are.

The film, given its subject and the relentless sincerity of it all, is worth seeing and keeping for later (much, much later!) viewing again. It helps that neither the original "The Falls" (QC Cinema QCC-343 being the North American DVD edition viewed) nor this sequel, "The Falls: Testament of Love" (of which QC Cinema QCC-378 is the DVD edition viewed), makes light of Mormonism. There is a successful attempt, indeed, to portray Mormonism authentically and without undue mockery or vituperation. (This assessment coming from the writer of these lines, who directly experienced life and Utah family heritage, dissolute Grandpa's ongoing discreet polygamy and all, in childhood within the pagan L.D.S. cult.) Such restraint counts among the positive assets of this surely made-for-video movie.

Despite all of these good elements, many will find this sequel to be intolerably dreary, given its pace and also the inept yammering that constitutes the dialogue. As for any nudity, the movie does show some bare skin, but the only full-frontally naked display occurs in a brief glimpse of the less handsome (and less physically fit, even somewhat pudgy) of the Mormon male duo while he is showering. The best recommendation is to see the first of the two films and, if one really reacts positively enough to it, then (and only then) to see the follow-up, gearing up oneself for a lot of earnest boredom along the way. It is nice, after all, to know what happens later (i.e., after the time of the first film's action) to these appealing, good-looking, and intensely serious lads.

FALLS: TESTAMENT OF LOVE [Import]
FALLS: TESTAMENT OF LOVE [Import]
Price: CDN$ 24.98
15 used & new from CDN$ 20.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Five Years after Being Disgraced During Their Mormon Mission, These L.D.S. Young Men Renew Their Fervent Gay Love Liaison, Nov. 18 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The concept of this film is better than its realisation. "The Falls: Testament of Love" is about two gay/bisexual L.D.S. Mormons, who had been missionary companions, together having an homosexual love affair on their mission, who were dismissed, who enjoyed a leisurely amourous gay roadtrip before parting seemingly for good, and who now reunite five years later. The premise of sexual ardour reignited, love coming out of remission, and how that impacts the life of the one of the two young men who has married, is the stuff of a first-rate romantic epic. However, as good as the concept is, the slow pacing and languid timing of this plodding video-movie is anything but adequately cinematic. Truly banal, inept dialogue does not help things along one little bit. The acting per se, for all of that, mostly is quite fine, however numerous the faults of the script and direction are.

The film, given its subject and the relentless sincerity of it all, is worth seeing and keeping for later (much, much later!) viewing again. It helps that neither the original "The Falls" (QC Cinema QCC-343 being the North American DVD edition viewed) nor this sequel, "The Falls: Testament of Love" (of which QC Cinema QCC-378 is the DVD edition viewed), makes light of Mormonism. There is a successful attempt, indeed, to portray Mormonism authentically and without undue mockery or vituperation. (This assessment coming from the writer of these lines, who directly experienced life and Utah family heritage, dissolute Grandpa's ongoing discreet polygamy and all, in childhood within the pagan L.D.S. cult.) Such restraint counts among the positive assets of this surely made-for-video movie.

Despite all of these good elements, many will find this sequel to be intolerably dreary, given its pace and also the inept yammering that constitutes the dialogue. As for any nudity, the movie does show some bare skin, but the only full-frontally naked display occurs in a brief glimpse of the less handsome (and less physically fit, even somewhat pudgy) of the Mormon male duo while he is showering. The best recommendation is to see the first of the two films and, if one really reacts positively enough to it, then (and only then) to see the follow-up, gearing up oneself for a lot of earnest boredom along the way. It is nice, after all, to know what happens later (i.e., after the time of the first film's action) to these appealing, good-looking, and intensely serious lads.

No Title Available

3.0 out of 5 stars Buckle up for a Long, Slow Ride Through Gay Mormon Turf!, Nov. 17 2015
The concept of this film is better than its realisation. "The Falls: Testament of Love" is about two gay/bisexual L.D.S. Mormons, who had been missionary companions, together having an homosexual love affair on their mission, who were dismissed, who enjoyed a leisurely amourous gay roadtrip before parting seemingly for good, and who now reunite five years later. The premise of sexual ardour reignited, love coming out of remission, and how that impacts the life of the one of the two young men who has married, is the stuff of a first-rate romantic epic. However, as good as the concept is, the slow pacing and languid timing of this plodding video-movie is anything but adequately cinematic. Truly banal, inept dialogue does not help things along one little bit. The acting per se, for all of that, mostly is quite fine, however numerous the faults of the script and direction are.

The film, given its subject and the relentless sincerity of it all, is worth seeing and keeping for later (much, much later!) viewing again. It helps that neither the original "The Falls" (QC Cinema QCC-343 being the North American DVD edition viewed) nor this sequel, "The Falls: Testament of Love" (of which QC Cinema QCC-378 is the DVD edition viewed), makes light of Mormonism. There is a successful attempt, indeed, to portray Mormonism authentically and without undue mockery or vituperation. (This assessment coming from the writer of these lines, who directly experienced life and Utah family heritage, dissolute Grandpa's ongoing discreet polygamy and all, in childhood within the pagan L.D.S. cult.) Such restraint counts among the positive assets of this surely made-for-video movie.

Despite all of these good elements, many will find this sequel to be intolerably dreary, given its pace and also the inept yammering that constitutes the dialogue. As for any nudity, the movie does show some bare skin, but the only full-frontally naked display occurs in a brief glimpse of the less handsome (and less physically fit, even somewhat pudgy) of the Mormon male duo while he is showering. The best recommendation is to see the first of the two films and, if one really reacts positively enough to it, then (and only then) to see the follow-up, gearing up oneself for a lot of earnest boredom along the way. It is nice, after all, to know what happens later (i.e., after the time of the first film's action) to these appealing, good-looking, and intensely serious lads.

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