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Gerald Parker "Gerald Parker" (Rouyn-Noranda, QC., Dominion of Canada)
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The Rhythm In Me / Sur le Rythme [Blu-ray] (Version française)
The Rhythm In Me / Sur le Rythme [Blu-ray] (Version française)
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5.0 out of 5 stars See Nico Archambault and a Large Cast of the Best Dancers in Québec and Elsewhere in Canada, Too, Dance up a Storm!, Jan. 24 2015
Nico Archambault is the Québécois male dancer and choreographer (b. 1984 in Montréal) who soared from well-schooled professionalism (but obscurity so far as the greater public for entertainment was concerned) to the heights of popular fame and glory when he won first place in the initial season of "So You Think You Can Dance Canada". He enraptured the public at that widely televised event and his renown was instantly assured. The man's sheer beauty and charisma equal his terrific talent as a dancer in many idioms. In the role of Marc Plainchaud (which would be French for "Fully Hot" except for one spelling difference which, anyway, would not affect pronunciation!) in the 2011 dance film, "Sur le rythme" (the English title of which is "The Rhythm in Me"). In this movie, he appears at his best, moustached and lightly bearded, with thick, wavy auburn hair that, together with his pastel-blue eyes, give him a full yet firm, sensuous face that commands attention, allied with an impressively well-developed body and beautiful complexion. Visually, he is a delight to behold and it is rather a shame that Nico does not shed more frequently the various shirts which he wears so much of the time!

"Sur le rythme" (Seville/Entertainment One 210786-DV being the DVD edition viewed, including English subtitles, rather than the Blu-ray alternative) is, essentially and unsurprisingly, a cinematic show-case for Nico Archambault, but the movie also displays some of the best examples of dancing to be seen in Montréal, or, for that matter, in Canada, from "modern dance" and breakdance, to commercial show dancing, and much in between. It would be nice if there had been an occasional slow number, but there is plenty of variety to the up-tempo, lively fare that prevails. While there is the usual quotient of "squirm and churn" in the choreography, most of it is bracingly vigourous, quite athletic, and even awesomely acrobatic. Some discothèque dancing scenes occur, as well, including a music video that is among the DVD's bonus features, and few people need to be informed that French-Canadians out-boogie any other white folks (straight or gay) anywhere else on the North American continent. The dancers assembled throughout the film are among the best available in Québec and more widely within the Dominion of Canada.

Although Nico Archambault is the leading star of the film, the story, on which so much fine dancing is pegged, revolves around the leading female in the cast, Mylène Saint-Sauveur (as Delphine), whose plight is the frequently told story of going into an artistic profession (dance, of course, in this movie) over the objections of her parents, who press her to continue her medical studies. The story is hardly original, but the drama that plays itself out between the dance scenes is one that is strong on credibility and gratefully free. for the most part, of the kinds of soppy sentiment and clichés that abound in so many other motion pictures with this common variety plot.

Saint-Sauveur dances well enough to make her a believable enough partner for Nico Archambault, surely, in itself, no mean achievement. France Castel, as Delphine's supportive grandmother, had been an highly successful singing star in French pop music (of the middle-of-the-road kind) in earlier decades, and her turn here as an actress is very accomplished, making her character a very appealing old lady. This film is first class from top to bottom, especially in all matters related to dance, but in other cinematic aspects as well. Highly recommended!

The Rhythm In Me / Sur le Rythme (Version française)
The Rhythm In Me / Sur le Rythme (Version française)
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Extraordinary Nico Archambault Heads a Cast of Terrific Dancers in This Film Displaying the Best of Pop Dance in Montréal, Jan. 24 2015
Nico Archambault is the Québécois male dancer and choreographer (b. 1984 in Montréal) who soared from well-schooled professionalism (but obscurity so far as the greater public for entertainment was concerned) to the heights of popular fame and glory when he won first place in the initial season of "So You Think You Can Dance Canada". He enraptured the public at that widely televised event and his renown was instantly assured. The man's sheer beauty and charisma equal his terrific talent as a dancer in many idioms. In the role of Marc Plainchaud (which would be French for "Fully Hot" except for one spelling difference which, anyway, would not affect pronunciation!) in the 2011 dance film, "Sur le rythme" (the English title of which is "The Rhythm in Me"). In this movie, he appears at his best, moustached and lightly bearded, with thick, wavy auburn hair that, together with his pastel-blue eyes, give him a full yet firm, sensuous face that commands attention, allied with an impressively well-developed body and beautiful complexion. Visually, he is a delight to behold, so it may seem rather a shame to many of his admirers that Nico does not shed more frequently the various shirts in which his muscled torso is garbed so much of the time!

"Sur le rythme" (Seville/Entertainment One 210786-DV being the DVD edition viewed, one that includes English subtitles) is, essentially and unsurprisingly, a cinematic show-case for Nico Archambault, but the movie also displays some of the best examples of dancing to be seen in Montréal, or, for that matter, in Canada, from "modern dance" and breakdance, to commercial show dancing, and much in between. It would be nice if there had been an occasional slow number, but there is plenty of variety to the up-tempo, lively fare that prevails. While there is the usual quotient of "squirm and churn" in the choreography, most of it is bracingly vigourous, quite athletic, and even awesomely acrobatic. Some discothèque dancing scenes occur, as well, including a music video that is among the DVD's bonus features, and few people need to be informed that French-Canadians out-boogie any other white folks (straight or gay) anywhere else on the North American continent. The dancers assembled throughout the film are among the best available in Québec and more widely within the Dominion of Canada.

Although Nico Archambault is the leading star of the film, the story, on which so much fine dancing is pegged, revolves around the leading female in the cast, Mylène Saint-Sauveur (as Delphine), whose plight is the frequently told story of going into an artistic profession (dance, of course, in this movie) over the objections of her parents, who press her to continue her medical studies. The story is hardly original, but the drama that plays itself out between the dance scenes is one that is strong on credibility and gratefully free. for the most part, of the kinds of soppy sentiment and clichés that abound in so many other motion pictures with this common variety plot.

Saint-Sauveur dances well enough to make her a believable enough partner for Nico Archambault, surely, in itself, no mean achievement. France Castel, as Delphine's supportive grandmother, had been an highly successful singing star in French pop music (of the middle-of-the-road kind) in earlier decades, and her turn here as an actress is very accomplished, making her character a very appealing old lady. This film is first class from top to bottom, especially in all matters related to dance, but in other cinematic aspects as well. Highly recommended!

Mesnak (Version française)
Mesnak (Version française)
DVD ~ Victor Andres Turgeon-Trelles

4.0 out of 5 stars Trouble Brews in a Remote North American Native People's Community as a Young Man Enters the Scene in Search of Family, Jan. 14 2015
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This review is from: Mesnak (Version française) (DVD)
"Mesnak" is a motion picture bearing as title the name of a tortoise whose presence is used to embody the Native North American traditions of the community about which the animal crawls, snarls, and snaps quite a lot of the time. Truth be told, so much is made of Mesnak that the reptile becomes rather a too-much manoeuvred cliché, in a movie that has gratefully few weaknesses otherwise.

As the film opens, Dave, an aspiring actor in Montréal, is seen preparing to play the title role in Shakespeare's "Hamlet" (in French translation). His drama coach, finding that his portrayal is too one-sided, suggests that the young man needs to learn more about life to understand the complex role more adequately. Dave then finds a mailing to him revealing something of his birth (the lad having been raised by a couple in Montréal who, unbeknownst to him, adopted Dave at the age of three); included is a photo of his Native ("Indian") mother, Gertrude (who, of course not by chance, has the same name as Hamlet's mother), with a cryptic note summoning Dave to come to her in a time of need. He makes the trip and, reaching the Indian settlement, finds Gertrude and, depicted just before that, the man whom she loves at the time, leader of the local Indian band, who is none too pleased to see the illegitimate son of his bride-to-be enter upon the scene.

Dave (played by Victor Andrés Turgeon-Trelles, a Peruvian-Québécois actor) has stumbled unwittingly into a complex situation. His mother, the man betrothed to her, and Dave's natural father had been involved in a tragic situation that resulted in the father's death, its cause obfuscated, as Dave learns from the blind native activist who, in contacting him, has been drawing Dave into a difficult political position. To say more of that situation would reveal too many details of the plot which the potential viewer should discover for himself. As a clue, without revealing too much, one can state that the nature of suchlike, artfully and approximately (rather than with slavish imitation), parallels elements of the play, "Hamlet". Things become at first complex for Dave and for the others, then all of that and very tense as well.

Meanwhile, a native girl, Osalic (acted by Ève Ringuette) befriends Dave and the two embark upon a romantic sexual relationship. Unfortunately for the two lovers, Osalic's half-brother already had been coercing her into having an incestuous relationship with him, which gives rise to jealousy that further heightens tensions and motivates Osalic, despite being a good swimmer, intentionally to drown herself from guilt and sorrow (but without any hint of Ophelia-like onset of insanity impelling Osalic to her own suicide in this manner). The young woman's still corpse is seen floating, washed up into watery shallows, as the film ends. Summoning Dave to re-enter his community of birth has had terrible consequences.

To express some irony here, at film's end Dave doubtlessly has gained the kind of bitter life experience, evident to anyone who views the motion picture to see fully how things turn out, which will equip him better to play "Hamlet" upon return to Montréal.

The movie, alas for Anglophones, lacks subtitles in the DVD edition viewed (K-Films Amérique KF-052), although the film itself had been provided with English subtitles. Fortunately, many of the actors, including Turgeon-Trelles himself, speak their lines in Canadian French so clearly that even someone as hard of hearing as the writer of these lines can make out enough of the dialogue to follow the action.

This art film is certainly worth discovering. It is well confected, the camera work (capturing some beautiful scenery along the way) is admirably accomplished, and the members of the cast vary from good to superb. Victor Andrés Turgeon-Trelles is an actor well known in Québec and his increasingly common appearances in movies of wider distribution are helping to make him better known. His wavy black-haired beauty, of lanky but elegant physique with a memorably characterful, handsome face, certainly must be a factor contributing to his growing renown. Ève Ringuette is a buxomly attractive actress who, one hopes, would seem destined, as well, to a good film career although, admittedly, she seems to have done little so far apart from this 2011 movie. The film is as well acted as it is artfully conceived and, for the most part, skillfully realised.

The Torrent / Le Torrent
The Torrent / Le Torrent

5.0 out of 5 stars An Art Film from Québec of Aching Beauty Yet One Depicting Searingly Destructive Inner Torment, Jan. 12 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Torrent / Le Torrent (DVD)
"Le Torrent" (Entertainment One 200428-DV being the DVD edition viewed) is an art film of hauntingly strange and intense beauty which Remstar Films released in 2012, about the quiet desperation of an illegitimate son and of his bitterly self-loathing, cruel, and banefully pious mother. The movie depicts the struggle between faith and religion's inability (despite all obstacles) to quench the life force, notwithstanding the perverse biogotry here of this mother which contrasts with her son's stubborn resistance to her overbearing, extremely repressive faith in one grimly odious variety of Roman Catholicism in all of its up-tightness and revolting scrupulosity. The lure of Nature in its manifest and innocent enticements, the presence of which nearly engulfs the remotely situated farm, at least constitutes one force that the suffering lad is able to enjoy without reserve, as inwardly dead in so many other ways as he may be to life.

The luminous quality of the camera work makes the beauty of Sainte-Ursule (in the Mauricie region of Québec) to be one of this film's particularly rewarding assets. Another visual aspect that can sweep away the viewer is the sheer lean and lanky masculine, wavy dark-haired beauty of François, the male protagonist, in the scenes of him as adolescent and young man. Victor Andrés Turgeon-Trelles (that being only one of three ways found so far to sort out his name!), who assumes the role, is a Québec actor of rather gaunt but nonetheless strikingly handsome appeal. A child actor (Anthony Therrien) plays the scenes of François as a boy, the film going back and forth chronologically in François' besettingly miserable existence and in the life of his mother, Claudine, whom also two members of the cast portray, an actress for her as a young woman (Laurence Leboeuf, who also is the film's Amica) and another for her as middle-aged mother (Dominique Quesnel).

It would be counter to the reader's best interest to recount what little plot there is in this motion picture, which is more about states of mind, mood, desires, motivations, and so forth than it is about any dominant narrative. In short, existentialism and Freudian (or perhaps Jungian) psychology are what is paramount, rather than action. The plight of François, Claudine, and Amica (the last named being the gypsy girl who enters François' life). The young man, frustrated by his sexual hang-ups, despite his renunciation of becoming the priest whom his mother has attempted to raise him to be and despite, too, his eventual rejection altogether of the Catholic faith, is unable to act upon his sexual urges, which he represses apart, however reluctantly, from masturbating. François therefore is unable to succeed at having a sexual relationship with beautiful Amica. Having come to reject Catholicism, as well as any natural eroticism, poor François nearly extinguishes alike his spirituality and his sexuality, becoming a dead man within his own life.

The deafness that results from Claudine's violent assault upon her son, when he states to her his refusal to seek the priesthood, isolates him all the more from his mother and from Amica. The only sound that François can hear, whether truly or as memory conjures it, is the sound of the rushing water of the river, especially of its cascading rapids, near the farm where Claudine, François, and Amica eke out a scruffy, hard-scrabble existence. Indeed, love of the rushing water and of all Nature, especially of animal life, embodied most keenly by the presence of a horse, a magnificent black mare which the farm acquires, are among the few sources of unmitigated pleasure, gratefully uncomplicated, that François finds in his blighted life, which Turgeon-Trelles' portrayal so deftly makes palpable to the viewer.

The reader must see this quietly sensitive and evocative film to discover, for himself, how things turn out for its protagonists! There are English subtitles, fortunately, which help the Anglophone or hard-of-hearing viewer considerably to follow the film's plot through the dialogue. See the film and savour its many treasurable assets and charms!

House of Wax
House of Wax
DVD ~ Vincent Price
Offered by BARGOONS
Price: CDN$ 19.99
13 used & new from CDN$ 6.49

3.0 out of 5 stars The Same Horror and Gore Twice Over, to Gorge Your Eyes upon!, Jan. 6 2015
This review is from: House of Wax (DVD)
What a contrast there is between the two cinematic accounts of this tale of horror and gore! "Mystery of the Wax Museum" is the earlier of the two, from 1933, set in the "roaring '20s" then moving onwards to the "flirty '30s", is faster moving, racier, and more light-hearted, a tale of a sassy gal reporter as much as, or more, than a tale of the macabre. Fay Wray, of gorilla-hugging fame in R.K.O. Studios' "King Kong", is the lass whose life the mad sculptor of wax and of human flesh (acted by Lionel Atwill) cuts short to become the corpse which the "artist" and his apprentices wax for the Joan of Arc exhibit in the infamous museum, but it is Glenda Farrell who plays the delectable part of the girl reporter! The 1933 film moves along at a lively clip and is, well, even a bit frantically paced, and a lot of fun.

The 1953 film, for its part titled "House of Wax", set in Edwardian times and starring Vincent Price, is the one that scared all of my childhood friends witless who went to see it, back then, for fifty cents admission or so, but for which I, turning ten years old that year, did not have the admission money (the Saturday kiddies' matinée of those times, usually only asking twenty-five cents admission for more ordinary triple bills of three movies, news reels, and cartoons, a 3-D film costing twice as much). Atwill and Price both are lugubrious characters, but, alas, so are too many of the other members of the later cast, making the 1953 film, even if only compared to the 1933 effort, a rather blandly genteel cinematic outing.

Both films look good as Warner Home Video's double-sided DVD. the two movies backing each other on the disc (bearing catalogue number 11054 for the North American edition viewed). The 1933 b&w film has been colourised in somewhat pastel tones, thankfully, rather than in more garish ones. The 1953 movie was made in vivid colour and is well processed as released here. It is fun to revisit these two classics of their genre, especially the earlier of them!

Dream Of Gerontius/Hymn Of Jes
Dream Of Gerontius/Hymn Of Jes
Price: CDN$ 15.92
37 used & new from CDN$ 7.43

5.0 out of 5 stars Sargent & Britten Plumb Depths & Expressitivity of Elgar's Music as Few Others Have So Managed, with Great Performance Partners, Jan. 5 2015
Whatever one think of the work of the solo vocalists in Elgar's "Dream of Gerontius", the choral work in this recording which Sir Benjamin Britten's directs is sublime, "as good as it gets". The true collector must have Sir Malcolm Sargent's supremely great performance, wonderfully conducted and superbly sung by choir and soloists alike, but for a relatively more modern recording of this music (even though, of course, it is not a "new" one), in excellent stereo sound withal, despite a few minor peculiarities, Britten's is the one to have. The chorus sings so beautifully as to make it essential. Despite some liberties (brilliantly conceived, by the way), Britten delivers more that is in the spirit of the work than most conductors find.

Angel of Death
Angel of Death
DVD ~ Mira Sorvino
Offered by importcds__
Price: CDN$ 0.47
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not Totally Dismal, Thanks to Sexy Male Actor, Olivier Martinez, & to Gorgeous Artistic Heritage of Colourfully Catholic Seville, Jan. 4 2015
This review is from: Angel of Death (DVD)
One may wonder why a film with several distinguished and popular actors, which is the case of "Semana Santa", has had no Amazon reviews until now (writing in Jan. 2015). Well, there are a dozen of them, at present, on Amazon-U.S. for the film in its North American packaging, as one finds it on the North American edition viewed (Alliance Atlantis 20645) as "Angel of Death" (in French titled "Ange mortel"). The film has not had much of a welcome on DVD, judging from Amazon and IMDb reviews. That is understandable, however, despite so many good ingredients, not least of which are the beauties of traditional, Spanish Baroque encrusted and super-Catholic Sevilla as well as elsewhere in Andalusia, the movie's settings, which also are its filming locations. The first part of this motion picture makes Seville's visual splendour very present to the viewer's attention.

The other truly major visual asset is Olivier Martinez, the French actor of the Spanish family name. He looks in top form, and, let us face it, the man who has been called "the French Brad Pitt", rather inappropriately due to the decidedly latin character of his undeniable physical beauty and grace, thus differing considerably from Pitt's very Anglo-Flemish/American brand of charisma) is terrific "eye candy" to find in such a minor-league film. Unfortunately, Olivier Martinez' acting, as seen here, does not manifest itself, alas, at his best. Mostly Martinez displays too seldom relenting states of irritation, pique, and male-chauvinistic boorishness; although that is, of course, in large part the fault of the movie's mediocre script, Martinez' crude acting here on this outing does nothing at all to compensate or to make the best of it. It would be rather a pity for many, doubtlessly, that the film gives such an elegant stud, as Olivier Martinez certainly is, no occasion to shed some clothes! Probably the film's often incoherent script left him too uninterested in any potential results. Martinez might just as well have employed that part, the visual one, of his gifts on a good photographic fashion-shoot in Milan or Paris rather than on this motion picture.

The rest of the cast is better, whether marginally thus, or, in the case of the ageing and very great Alida Valli, sublimely so. Mira Sorvino is the female lead who is a criminal investigator, in harness with Martinez, looking together into the spooky case of a serial murderer in ecclesiastically anonymous disguise (due to the red hood that completely obscures his head, as hoods, mostly white, abound all over the place in Seville's Holy Week celebrations) whose identity and motivations the two investigate. Sorvino's acting is better than Martinez', but not by much. Again, she seems miscast and probably as bored with this incoherent project as her far more glamourous male co-star is.

For views of Sevilla, one would do better to acquire a tourist video about the famous old city. For the story, one definitely, too much so, would have to read the novel on which this farrago is based. There just is too much of the story about which the movie leaves those watching it frustratingly in the dark. So, this is a visually splendid film, but one that lacks too much in the quality of other good cinematic ingredients.

Semana Santa - Édition Spéciale
Semana Santa - Édition Spéciale

3.0 out of 5 stars Lacklustre Film, but One Which Stars Major Male Eye-Candy, Olivier Martinez, Jan. 4 2015
One may wonder why a film with several distinguished and popular actors, which is the case of "Semana Santa", has had no Amazon reviews until now (writing in Jan. 2015). Well, there are a dozen of them on Amazon's U.S. site, at present, for the film in its North American packaging, as one finds it on the North American edition viewed (Alliance Atlantis 20645) as "Angel of Death" (in French titled "Ange mortel"). The film has not had much of a welcome on DVD, judging from Amazon and IMDb reviews. That is understandable, however, despite so many good ingredients, not least of which are the beauties of traditional, Spanish Baroque encrusted and super-Catholic Sevilla as well as elsewhere in Andalusia, the movie's settings, which also are its filming locations. The first part of this motion picture makes Seville's visual splendour very present to the viewer's attention.

The other truly major visual asset is Olivier Martinez, the French actor of the Spanish family name. He looks in top form, and, let us face it, the man who has been called "the French Brad Pitt", rather inappropriately due to the decidedly latin character of his undeniable physical beauty and grace, thus differing considerably from Pitt's very Anglo-Flemish/American brand of charisma) is terrific "eye candy" to find in such a minor-league film. Unfortunately, Olivier Martinez' acting, as seen here, does not manifest itself, alas, at his best. Mostly Martinez displays too seldom relenting states of irritation, pique, and male-chauvinistic boorishness; although that is, of course, in large part the fault of the movie's mediocre script, Martinez' crude acting here on this outing does nothing at all to compensate or to make the best of it. It would seem rather a pity, doubtlessly for many viewers, that the film gives such an elegant stud, as Olivier Martinez certainly is, no occasion to shed some clothes! Probably the film's often incoherent script left him too uninterested in any potential results. Martinez might just as well have employed that part, the visual one, of his gifts on a good photographic fashion-shoot in Milan or Paris rather than on this motion picture.

The rest of the cast is better, whether marginally thus, or, in the case of the ageing and very great Alida Valli, sublimely so. Mira Sorvino is the female lead who is a criminal investigator, in harness with Martinez, looking together into the spooky case of a serial murderer in ecclesiastically anonymous disguise (due to the red hood that completely obscures his head, as hoods, mostly white, abound all over the place in Seville's Holy Week celebrations) whose identity and motivations the two investigate. Sorvino's acting is better than Martinez', but not by much. Again, she seems miscast and probably as bored with this incoherent project as her far more glamourous male co-star is.

For views of Sevilla, one would do better to acquire a tourist video about the famous old city. For the story, one definitely, too much so, would have to read the novel on which this farrago is based. There just is too much of the story about which the movie leaves those watching it frustratingly in the dark. So, this is a visually splendid film, but one that lacks too much in the quality of other good cinematic ingredients.

Pour l'amour de Dieu (For the Love of God) (Version française)
Pour l'amour de Dieu (For the Love of God) (Version française)
DVD ~ Madeleine Péloquin
Price: CDN$ 26.82
7 used & new from CDN$ 6.98

4.0 out of 5 stars A Child's School-Girl "Crush" and a Nun's Love Make Things Difficult for a Handsome Young Priest in Montréal of the Late 1950s, Jan. 2 2015
This 2011 Québec film seems to start unpromisingly, depicting the "nicey-nice" aura of pious Roman Catholic religion practised (but also some stressful family life lived out) in Montréal of the late 1950s. The problems of the young girl, Léonie (played as young girl by child actress Ariane Legault), with bladder control, on the physical side, and unhealthy obsession with the church life of her parish, are there from the get-go, but the "sweet Jesus" mood of it seems sentimentally cloying. The leading figure among the nuns, Sr. Cécile, also is just too holy-sweetie-pie for her own (or the child's) good.

As it turns out, however, the opening makes a dramatic contrast to the air of simmering, suppressed eroticism that ensues when a young Puerto Rican postulant for the priesthood, on the verge of ordination (which he receives in Montréal) in the Dominican order, arrives among these women. Victor Andrés Turgeon-Trelles, a sweetly handsome young Peruvian-Québécois actor, embodies this smooth-faced young priest with sensuously lanky beauty, a slightly exotic appeal, and exceptionally radiant complexion. Turgeon-Trelles is even more strikingly the elegantly lovely young man, of irresistible physical appeal, when he is out of costume, trimly bearded, as one views him participating in the bonus special feature included.

Léonie develops a school-girl "crush" on Fr. Malachy. Of far more serious consequence, Sr. Cécile, a parish school teaching nun (as Madeleine Péloquin, a young actress who herself is of irresistibly great beauty, takes the part) falls in love with Fr. Malachy, who reciprocates her passion. The agonies of conscience and of self-mortification, all hag-ridden with the scrupulosity and sexual up-tightness so endemic, even nowadays and much more so then in those days just preceding the Second Vatican Council, among Catholics. A written indiscretion in Sr. Cécile's hand, and the child's confession to another priest eventually betray their attraction for each other and the two reluctant lovers are parted.

Years later the triangle (i.e. Malachy, Léonie, and Cécile) cross paths in old age. Among those playing the roles of the elderly man and of the two ageing women, Geneviève Bujold, as the old Cécile, is the most famous of the three actors depicting these seniors. It would be unadvisable to go into detail about what ensues on their reunion, since the potential viewer should discover that for himself! Their reunion is full of tenderness and gently romantic irony, let it be said, leaving things at that.

Given the modest means available to Micheline Lanctôt, whose film this largely is (and who plays the agèd Léonie), this film from Mongrel Media stands up well to close visual scrutiny, looking quite professional. The intimate drama of frustrated eroticism and Québécois religiosity is, indeed, worth one's trouble to acquire the DVD (Métopole DVD-4708 being the domestic Québec edition viewed) and to see it. Fortunately, the French-language film includes good English subtitles (although the excellent and rather extensive bonus special feature lacks them).

Reformation Heritage Study Bible-KJV
Reformation Heritage Study Bible-KJV
by Joel R. Beeke
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 50.46
21 used & new from CDN$ 28.82

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome the Recent (and Long Overdue) Publication of a Truly Protestant Study Bible Using the Truly Supreme K.J.V. Bible as Text, Jan. 1 2015
I recently received in the mail the newly published study Bible (in its hardbound binding option), "The Reformation Heritage K.J.V. Study Bible", ed. by Joel E. Beek et al. (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Reformation Heritage Books, 2014). I had ordered this on a pre-publication offer. It Is superb, every bit as good as what I had heard and read, prior to its appearance on the market, about the project that produced it!

This is one of the rare truly Protestant (i.e. Reformed/Presbyterian or Lutheran) study Bibles that uses the text of the Authorised "King James" Version (A.V.). I have some other Protestant study Bibles which I use a lot, especially "The Lutheran Study Bible" (Concordia, using the English Standard Version) and the "New Geneva Study Bible" (Nelson, using the New King James Version), which have truly excellent notes and other study apparatus, but it means a lot to have a truly sound and genuinely Protestant study Bible which, for once, uses the A.V. (K.J.V.). For one thing, this means that one can trust the translation used, too, as well as the notes, without need constantly to refer back-and-forth between books when using a non-A.V. study Bible in order to consult the A.V.'s authoritative renderings, which is what happens when using a study Bible that takes a 20th or 21st century translation as the text used.

It is rather a pity that "The Reformation Heritage K.J.V. Bible" does not include at least some of the writings of the Apocrypha (i.e., the deuterocanonical portions of the O.T.), which form part of the full A.V. (K.J.V.) translation and also of the earlier Geneva Bible version. However, that is forgivable (and, alas, all too expected).

Also, "The Reformation Heritage K.J.V. Study Bible" is free of the taint of false doctrine, prophecy-mongering, and of compromise so prevalent among the televangelists (of radio or TV, e.g. Swindol, Hagee, and other such varmints and shysters), the "parachurch ministries", and sects (Methodists, Campbellites, Pentecostals, most Baptists, et al.), with their variously false Neo-Evangelical or charismatic/Pentecostal bias, so abundant in any of the dubious annotated or study Bible which have appeared under their auspices.

The editors of this new study Bible adhere firmly and unwaveringly to the Infallibility, Indefectability, and Inerrancy of the Holy Bible and to the superiority of the A.V. (K.J.V.) Bible's English text, and that is a very, very good thing. This counts a lot for me!

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