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Jason N. Mical (Kirkland, WA, USA)
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The Talisman
The Talisman
by Stephen King
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
57 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Did I Read the Same Talisman as Everyone Else??, Aug. 26 2001
When Stephen King collaborated with horror legend Peter Straub early in his career to create a combined horror novel, The Talisman was the dubious result. While written past King's early prime and long before his recent literary explosion, The Talisman is still awful compared to his other works around this era - and any of Straub's books. The plot will seem familiar to King and Straub readers - a young boy, Jack, must travel through an alternate fantasy reality to recover an object called the talisman to restore life to the queen of that land - who happens to be his mother's "twinner," or spiritually-connected mirror image in the fantasy world. Therefore, saving the queen will save his mother's life as well. After that, the book becomes a road trip novel with some horror elements as Jack makes his way from the East to the West coast, experiencing the horrors of our world and the alternate world, from real physical dangers to corrupt, hypocritical preachers, to abusive, pedophile cops. While The Talisman's premise is a good one, it never takes off like King's great books (and Straub's, too). The reader can, in fact, tell which passages King wrote and which ones Straub wrote (they seemed to have alternated 1-for-1), and this uneven quality contributes to the book's downfall. The reader can never quite get into the story - 200 pages from the end, I had no desire to finish. I didn't really care what happened to the characters, and the story had bored me so much at that point, I just put it down and never came back. If you're looking for good King, good Straub, good horror, or good fantasy, look elsewhere. Let this one sit on the shelves as a footnote to these two author's great literary careers.

Repo Man (Widescreen)
Repo Man (Widescreen)
DVD ~ Harry Dean Stanton
Offered by M and N Media Canada
Price: CDN$ 82.04
10 used & new from CDN$ 24.95

5.0 out of 5 stars A Proud One Among Many, Aug. 23 2001
This review is from: Repo Man (Widescreen) (DVD)
Every decade, there seems to be a movie that defines the angst of the culture and the subculture, the collective feeling that something is wrong with the establishment. To call this zeitgeist is misleading; these films don't reflect the spirit of the times as much as they somehow tap into the opposite - they manage to create an all-around sense of unease about the state of the world. In the 1960s, it was The Graduate and the bombshell look at the end. For the 1990s, Fight Club identified many things wrong both with pop culture and those acting in rebellion against it. For the Reagan-saturated 1980s, the distinction falls squarely on Alex Cox's debut film Repo Man. In one of his first roles, Emilio Estevez plays Otto, a street punk who loses his job and college savings in the same day due to misunderstandings and television preachers. At the end of his rope financially and mentally, he agrees to make a quick 20 bucks by helping experienced repo man Bud (Harry Dean Stanton). Realizing the potential to make a good living, and an "intense" life in his new job, Otto signs up with the crew and becomes a repo man. On the way, he meets an unusual woman (Olivia Barash) whom he rapidly falls in lust with. When word comes down the wire that there's an enormous commission out on a 1964 Chevy Malibu, Otto and all the other repo men set out to look for the car with the huge score. What they find in the trunk is so unusual, it will change everything - EVERYTHING.
What makes Repo Man so unique is the obvious satirization not only of regular, and in this case conservative Reagean-esque, culture, from the "John Wayne was [gay]" speech to Bud's trashing of Russia, but the send-ups of punk culture (Let's go do some crimes! Yeah, let's get sushi and not pay!) Otto is the everyman in every sense of the word, as he - like us - realizes that no matter what culture he tries to be a part of, he never fits in, and those strains of culture are so rife with stupidity and hypocrisy that he no longer wants to belong. Like The Graduate and Fight Club, Repo Man also refuses to supply a stock answer, instead making the audience question instead of spoonfeeding them. Plus, it's roll-on-the-floor funny, with some of the best oneliners since Evil Dead 2 or Terminator 2. Alex Cox made Repo Man while still in film school, and he basically admits it's little more than a trumped-up student film. The lack of budget is obvious at times, but the killer screenplay and direction more than make up for that slight fault. As usual, the movie looks excellent on Anchor Bay's DVD; the sound and video are as clear as you can ask for, with a remixed 5.1 audio track to boot. There's a great commentary track with Alex Cox, some castmembers (sadly, no Harry Dean or Emilio), and some crew; it's a lot like a Kevin Smith commentary, with everyone sitting in one room, having a great time talking about a great film. There are no other extras to speak of, unless you buy the collector's tin (which does not look like the normal Repo Man cover - it looks like a California license plate, with Repo Man on it). The collector's tin has the soundtrack on CD and a booklet about the movie with a little comic in it. Unless you are a major fan or must have the best of the best of the best edition, there's no need to buy the more expensive version, but if you want it, you'd better get it quick, because at 30,000 copies, it'll be gone before you know it.
I would definitely check this movie out if you can, and would recommend buying it to anyone who asked.

Donnie Brasco (Special Edition) (Bilingual)
Donnie Brasco (Special Edition) (Bilingual)
DVD ~ Al Pacino
Price: CDN$ 8.52
30 used & new from CDN$ 0.58

5.0 out of 5 stars Keeping the Genre Fresh, Aug. 15 2001
Like Westerns, gangster films are a unique, American invention; our fascination for these movies seems hard to understand at times, considering the amoral and destructive actions of the patriarchal characters involved. Perhaps in spite of these deficiencies, gangster movies allow us to look at criminals as human beings, as flawed and unfortunate as the rest of us. Donnie Brasco, far more than other movies in the genre, takes this possibility and turns it into the driving force behind its emotional impact. It is a welcome relief from the near-glorification of gangster life in late 80s and early 90s movies such as Casino, Scarface, and others, and it injected a much-needed dose of nitro. Donnie Brasco's gangsters aren't your rich, creme de la creme godfathers - they are the underlings, involved in a lifestyle they can no longer refuse.
The film follows FBI Agent Joe Pistone, who is undercover in Brooklyn as Donnie Brasco, jeweler (Johnny Depp, in one of his best movie roles). After winning the trust and confidence of low-budget hitman "Lefty" (Al Pacino, who should have been nominated for an Oscar), "Donnie" begins to move around in the New York underworld. When the old boss is "whacked," another mobster seizes the opportunity and gains control, allowing "Donnie" to go further into the mob scene than any undercover cop ever did before. Eventually, the lines between work and self break down, making Donnie's ultimate decision all the more visceral and real.
Based on a true story, Donnie Brasco rings true throughout, uncompromising and unflinching. Depp and Pacino deliver outstanding performances, and Anne Heche, in a supporting role as Joe's increasingly frustrated wife, shines in her best role to date. The plot, too, moves along at a steady clip, never losing momentum and never slipping into the easy, moralizing path this film could easily have taken. The only real problem was at the beginning of the film, where things seem to happen without much reason, but causes and effects are easily inferred.
This DVD Special Edition has a very informative commentary track, and a few non-necessary deleted scenes. The picture and sound, however, are fantastic; nary a scratch or dust spot on the print, and the sound is as clear and well-mixed as can be expected. The featurettes are interesting, but seem a little too short (as do many DVD featurettes).
The movie is bound to become a classic, not only in the gangster genre but in American filmmaking as well. It's a special Special Edition, and definitely worth the cost. If you are a fan of the film, a fan of movies, or a fan of DVD, add this title to your collection as soon as you can.

House (Widescreen) (Double Feature House 1 & 2)
House (Widescreen) (Double Feature House 1 & 2)
Offered by M and N Media Canada
Price: CDN$ 187.71
10 used & new from CDN$ 13.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Ding Dong!, Aug. 5 2001
Perhaps one of the quintessential 1980s horror films, House makes its explosion onto the DVD format in this (relatively unadvertised) Anchor Bay Special/Limited Edition disc. The digital gurus at Anchor Bay's studios have given us another finely restored film, and the first 20,000 DVDs produced are actual limited editions with a bonus DVD that contains a restored House II: The Second Story. Fans, be speedy: these two-disc sets aren't going to last long, and this is House II's ONLY anticipated Region 1 release on DVD, ever. Once it's gone, it's gone.
But, is the 2 disc set even worth getting? House tells the story of Vietnam vet and writer Roger Cobb (William Katt) who, looking for solitude and a break from his ex-wife (Kay Lenz), decides to move into his aunt's old house after she commits suicide. Coincidentally, this is the same house where Cobb's son disappeared a couple of years ago - apparently one of the deciding factors in the divorce, and Cobb's current writing slump. After he checks in, all manner of strange things happen, from Vietnam flashbacks to ghostly goings-on.
As a horror film, House certainly holds its own against more serious slasher-fare. Like Sam Raimi's Evil Dead, House doesn't take itself as seriously as other movies in the genre, and the result is an oftentimes humorous piece of work (unintentionally or not). The horror elements are strong: you are never completely sure if the house is actually causing the events, or if the main character is slowly going insane. Unfortunately, the story is so disjointed that the main creep value is lost when baddies are revealed too early, and the final sequence turns into an action movie instead of a horror film. While farces aren't intended to be subtle, the subtle, layered effect created in the first 20 minutes is utterly ruined as soon as we see the monster, and from there on out everything either becomes more stereotypical 80s horror fare, or the comic version of the same. This problem doesn't render House unwatchable, but it certainly detracts, as if the director couldn't quite make up his mind about what way he wanted the movie to go.
The DVD, on the other hand, is fantastic. The sound, while in mono, is clear and crisp, and the video transfer is remarkable (although anything less from Anchor Bay would be a crime). The commentary track is loads of fun, and a 12-minute featurette on The Making of House provides a little historical context and amusement, too. Luckily, Anchor Bay didn't spare the bonus House II disc any of their normal bells and whistles, and again the sound (mono as well) is great along with the near-flawless video. The bonus disc also contains a full-length commentary which isn't nearly as entertaining as the other, but hey, neither is the movie. Fans of House (and House II, if anyone is willing to admit to it) will definitely want to get the Limited Edition as soon as possible, because House II is going to be gone for good once it sells out. Otherwise, if you liked House, and know what to expect from Anchor Bay, you know what to do - and at this price, it's hard not to.

Brain Droppings
Brain Droppings
by George Carlin
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 12.27
85 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars The Title Says It All, Aug. 1 2001
This review is from: Brain Droppings (Paperback)
Regardless of which Carlin camp you happen to fall into - the love it, hate it, or ambivalent to it camps - there's a little something for everyone in his first book of comedy, Brain Droppings. Those familiar with George's stand-up material probably won't be surprised by what lies between these pages, but for the rest of the world, a little explanation might be necessary.
Carlin is, first and foremost, a linguist, like many comedians (Steve Martin being another notable example). Delightful comedy springs from mastering language, and Carlin wields his Promethean tongue like a nuclear bomb, sparing absolutely nothing. Is he coarse, hateful, and full of venom? Yes. By using words not like swords but an executioner's axe, Carlin dismembers ideas and meanings about politics, religion, history, pop culture, sports, and English itself. His reasoning, it seems, is to throw the reader or listener so far from common meaning that the person is forced to invent - or at least reconsider - beliefs.
Brain Droppings contains many such aphoristic nukes. Some are a few words long, others continue for a few pages. There are some classics from his stand-up in here, notably "Football and Baseball" and "A Place for my Stuff." Unfortunately, this book really does seem like a collection of brain droppings - things that just kind of fell out of Carlin's mind. Good or bad, there they are. If this book has a weak point, it's that it wasn't edited very well, and some of the things in here are just plain silly and dumb. From a man who is so obviously intelligent and humorous, I expected more at times.
Overall, though, does it work? The nuke-'em-silly technique is certainly open to debate. Will people get it? Sometimes. Remember, for every person that got Archie Bunker's satirical character, there were two that thought he represented a true American, and five that couldn't stomach listening to him at all. People will find the same thing in these pages. It's certainly worth a read; if you don't like it, one of your friends definitely will.

The New York Trilogy
The New York Trilogy
by Paul Auster
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.44
76 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars A Puzzle of a Book About Mysteries, Aug. 1 2001
This review is from: The New York Trilogy (Paperback)
Unfortunately, Paul Auster's unique work, "The New York Trilogy," is one of those books usually purchased because of word-of-mouth advertising than off-the-shelf interest. The problem with people telling you about this little collection is that you often build a preconceived notion about what to expect from the work, either good, bad, or strange. If a book ever existed that should be read without any prior knowledge of it whatsoever, The New York Trilogy is it.
The book - really a collection of three novellas, originally published separately - follows the adventures of three different men on three different pulp-novel-style investigative cases. To give away more plot does the reader a disservice; after all, while one can describe a series of exhibits on a carnival's "Freak Row," recreating the emotions involved in walking down that alley defies the conventions of language. Language, and its employ, surrounds many of the events in these books. Auster plays with the reader, offering a mystery as engaging as the ones his characters attempt to solve. He scattered the clues throughout the book, but the responsibility of creating meaning from them - and, by extension, from the book - lies solely with the reader.
If that seems unfair of Auster to expect of a reader, and too intellectual and highbrow for people interested in a casual experience, "The New York Trilogy" contains plenty more to recommend it. The mystery of meaning (provided the postmodernists and their odiously pretentious "scholar"-lapdogs haven't ruined such fun things for you) is an optional part of enjoying this work, and those looking for a great read should not be turned away. Vivid, haunting descriptions of The City (by all means, read this book in New York if you have the chance) mingle with stories that show an obvious awe and respect for film-noir and pulp detective stories. Hopelessness, sorrow, happiness, luck and chance, double-crossing, and redemption all combine to form three solid stories that tickle the mind. One gets the impression that Auster wrote this work almost as a tribute to the noir-pulp style, while attempting to offer the reader another mystery, should the reader desire such a challenge.
The seeded subcontext in the book offers quite the literary experiment, and like all experiments it doesn't always work. It usually lies in the background, suggesting its presence, but occasionally comes forward and distracts - and detracts - from the main work itself. In addition, the content matter and strange circumstances might put off those with preconceived ideas (thus, my attempt to say much while revealing little). Auster's "Trilogy" certainly merits a read, although it may not immediately appeal to all sensibilities.

Touch of Evil (Restored to Orson Welles' Vision)
Touch of Evil (Restored to Orson Welles' Vision)
DVD ~ Charlton Heston
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 24.21
27 used & new from CDN$ 5.18

5.0 out of 5 stars Film Noir, Squared, July 29 2001
From the extended, amazing opening shot to the foregone final scene, Touch of Evil, actor-director Orson Welles' personal, pet project, continues to provide an engaging and timeless look at bigotry, corruption, and honor. Although political correctness and modern sensibilities haven't been kind to certain production aspects of this movie, the themes presented are still relevant today, especially considering increasing awareness of our exploding, vibrant Hispanic population in the United States.
The film opens with one of the most memorable shots in cinema, an almost 5-minute extended single take that follows Mexican detective Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston, with some noticeably un-PC makeup and hair dye), his American wife Susan (Hitchcock femme Janet Leigh), and others around a small Mexican border town. In fact, we learn the town is right on the border, divided in two by the imaginary line between the countries - and in the hearts and minds of those who live on either side. When a car bomb kills a wealthy American on the Mexican side of the border, Police Captain Hank Quinlan (Welles) and his cronies get the call, as it is suspected that the bomb was planted before the car drove over the border.
Vargas, already on someone's want-list for his investigations into a narcotics ring in Mexico City, dives into the case with Quinlan, finding few friends along the way. When Quinlan fabricates evidence to pin the crime on a Mexican living on the American side, Vargas begins to dig up dirt on the chief, and the sparks start to fly.
Touch of Evil is probably the finest example of the film noir genre, and Welles' camera angles emphasize the sinister aspects of everyone and everything. The film presented here is as close to Welles' original vision as restoration work allowed, and his memo about how to edit the film is included on the DVD. The black-and-white print has stood the test of time, with the blacks being sharp and deep and the whites looking as they should. The sound is as good as it's going to get, although fans of the film will notice the lack of many of the original Mancini songs in this print (most notably, in the opening shot).
This is one of the rare films where none of the characters are "good," although it's hard to describe any of them as completely "evil," either. Each one, even the minor characters, are fully realized and three-dimensional, which bolsters the timelessness of the story and the effectiveness it still holds. Look for Marlene Dietrich in what amounts to an extended cameo, and savvy film fans will find ToE has many things in common with the more recent Lone Star. Touch of Evil, in addition to being a classic of American cinema, still holds its own as a great movie to watch, digest, and ponder. Films like this are what cinema is all about, and it belongs on the shelf of any true collector.

Touch of Evil (Restored to Orson Welles' Vision)
Touch of Evil (Restored to Orson Welles' Vision)
DVD ~ Charlton Heston
Offered by Fulfillment Express CA
Price: CDN$ 24.21
27 used & new from CDN$ 5.18

5.0 out of 5 stars Film Noir, Squared, July 26 2001
From the extended, amazing opening shot to the foregone final scene, Touch of Evil, actor-director Orson Welles' personal, pet project, continues to provide an engaging and timeless look at bigotry, corruption, and honor. Although political correctness and modern sensibilities haven't been kind to certain production aspects of this movie, the themes presented are still relevant today, especially considering increasing awareness of our exploding, vibrant Hispanic population in the United States.
The film opens with one of the most memorable shots in cinema, an almost 5-minute extended single take that follows Mexican detective Mike Vargas (Charlton Heston, with some noticeably un-PC makeup and hair dye), his American wife Susan (Hitchcock femme Janet Leigh), and others around a small Mexican border town. In fact, we learn the town is right on the border, divided in two by the imaginary line between the countries - and in the hearts and minds of those who live on either side. When a car bomb kills a wealthy American on the Mexican side of the border, Police Captain Hank Quinlan (Welles) and his cronies get the call, as it is suspected that the bomb was planted before the car drove over the border.
Vargas, already on someone's want-list for his investigations into a narcotics ring in Mexico City, dives into the case with Quinlan, finding few friends along the way. When Quinlan fabricates evidence to pin the crime on a Mexican living on the American side, Vargas begins to dig up dirt on the chief, and the sparks start to fly.
Touch of Evil is probably the finest example of the film noir genre, and Welles' camera angles emphasize the sinister aspects of everyone and everything. The film presented here is as close to Welles' original vision as restoration work allowed, and his memo about how to edit the film is included on the DVD. The black-and-white print has stood the test of time, with the blacks being sharp and deep and the whites looking as they should. The sound is as good as it's going to get, although fans of the film will notice the lack of many of the original Mancini songs in this print (most notably, in the opening shot).
This is one of the rare films where none of the characters are "good," although it's hard to describe any of them as completely "evil," either. Each one, even the minor characters, are fully realized and three-dimensional, which bolsters the timelessness of the story and the effectiveness it still holds. Look for Marlene Dietrich in what amounts to an extended cameo, and savvy film fans will find ToE has many things in common with the more recent Lone Star. Touch of Evil, in addition to being a classic of American cinema, still holds its own as a great movie to watch, digest, and ponder. Films like this are what cinema is all about, and it belongs on the shelf of any true collector.

American Gods: A Novel
American Gods: A Novel
by Neil Gaiman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 21.00
38 used & new from CDN$ 2.71

5.0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get much better than this, July 4 2001
This review is from: American Gods: A Novel (Hardcover)
It's a rare author who weaves a perfect, creative narrative from the best of all possible materials, and a rare book that entertains, challenges, and entices from cover to cover with such a narrative. Neil Gaiman's "American Gods," the latest literary offering from the High Priest of the English Language's Temple of Original Stories, achieves exactly this for exactly that kind of writer. In "American Gods," the author of "Neverwhere" and the creator of the Sandman graphic novels fashions a story that fans will find distantly familiar, and new readers will lose themselves inside within a few pages.
The book opens with Shadow, the main character and an almost Shakespearian anti-hero, walking out of prison to learn that his wife has died. On the plane ride home, he meets an enigmatic con-man named Wednesday who offers Shadow a job - and a second chance at life. With little else to do except practice coin tricks he learned in prison, Shadow reluctantly accepts and the two begin a wintery, midwestern odyssey gathering other characters together in an attempt to weather an upcoming storm. The book follow's Shadow's travels as he discovers who he's working for, what's going on, and more about himself than he would ever want to know.
The journey involves dreams, altered realities, other dimensions, strange encounters, and myths and folklore from every non-American culture on the planet. As with other Gaiman work, there is a certain amount of fun to figuring out which fantastic character Shadow is talking to - and to figuring out where the twisting plot leads next.
Gaiman's premise - that gods are physically created by belief and made manifest - should be familiar to fans of his graphic novels, short stories, and other work. It is this kind of creativity that sets Gaiman apart from other authors today; his stories are as timeless as the mythologies that span cultures across the world, and yet they are original and fresh enough to engage the reader on a primal and intellectual level. After reading books like "American Gods" and Gaiman's other works, one imagines he would be utterly comfortable as a bard or storyteller, weaving tales of heros around the fireplace late at night to ward off the darkness and cold outside.
"American Gods" is just as epic as these old stories, and as engaging as a new novel should be. Gaiman is one of the most important and welcome voices in English-language literature today, although intellectual praise shouldn't put off the reader searching for a good story, because that's exactly what one will find between these covers. "American Gods" is a journey of delights that I can do nothing but recommend to any reader.

Titus (Widescreen)
Titus (Widescreen)
DVD ~ Anthony Hopkins
Offered by thebookcommunity_ca
Price: CDN$ 44.09
17 used & new from CDN$ 8.60

5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly Executed Shakespearian Drama, With a Twist, May 25 2001
This review is from: Titus (Widescreen) (DVD)
Julie Taymor's lavish arthouse film "Titus," based on one of Shakespeare's least-known plays, "Titus Andronicus," is a uniqe chimera of beauty, elegance, and social responsibility. Titus Andronicus, Shakespeare's first work not to draw directly on historical fact, lacks the depth of its immediate predecessor play, Richard III, instead succumbing to horrific violence and action without much of a point. This is probably why it hasn't been preformed or studied greatly, as it was clearly intended for a "groundling" audience, specifically to make money. The fact that it was the Bard's first true commercial success in his time attests to this fact, and the parallels between the sacrifice of content for the "bread and circuses" violence that people craved and modern, "braindead" action films today should be obvious.
Instead of turning her back on the work, Taymor openly embraced the violent nature of the play, but instead of making a blood-splattered production, she turned it into a powerful metaphor for the levels of violence and sexuality in our culture - and the lack of responsibility we take with such things.
The movie opens not in the past, but in the present - a young boy is playing "war" in his kitchen, and robots and toy soldiers explode around him and die. As a tank breaks down his wall, we are left unsure as to exactly what is fantasy and reality anymore - another brilliant take on the cause of violent actions, especially high-profile cases of violence by children, like the Columbine massacre.
The boy then enters the world of the play, where ancient Rome and modern times freely intermingle (and, despite my misgivings before seeing the film, this production choice does not detract at all from what happens onscreen). Titus (Anthony Hopkins, in the role that brought him out of his semi-retirement) and his soldiers - covered either with the grime of battle or a kind of caked-on, archaeological dirt, as if they were excavated from the ground, march into Rome, almost like the automatons the boy was playing with moments before. We learn they have just concluded a successful campaign against the Goths, and sacrifice one of the sons of the Goth's queen, Tamara (played to a "t" by Jessica Lange) as thanks. Tamara vows revenge, ends up supporting an upstart punk politician who takes over as emperor and sets out to destroy Titus' life.
This play has it all - disembowlments, rape, dismemberment, mutilation, insanity, political backstabbing, and sexual orgies. Through it all, the boy watches goggle-eyed and slackjawed, and becomes a kind of moral focal point for everything that happens around him - the lessons he "learns" (or rejects) in a strange fantasy world.
In a time when the lines between fantasy and reality become blurred, Taymor's Titus takes an uncompromising look at saturation of violence in our lives, and in the lives of our children. Because of this, it manages to take one of Shakespeare's worst works, an almost-parody of the levels of violence and action people so desperately seem to need, and makes it an incredibly moral story.
The Special Edition DVD is a two-disc set, the first disc featuring the film in glorious 5.1 surround, with some subtitle options and an interesting commentary track. The transfer is great, as should be expected from Fox, and the sound is crystal-clear. The second disc contains most of the special features, among which is an interview Julie Taymor gives at Columbia University.
As an arthouse play, and one that requires a good deal of thinking, Titus obviously isn't for everyone, but if you've studied Shakespeare, enjoy Shakespeare, or are interested in what an artistic director can achieve with some pretty crummy source material, be sure and check it out. You might want to consider renting it before you buy it, but try to stick with the widescreen version - the pan-n-scan doesn't do the beautiful cinematography justice.

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