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timothy k. Iverson

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Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: CDN$ 6.95
118 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Everything changes, Feb. 16 2001
The most striking feature of my experience with "Pride and Prejudice" is the sense of overwhelming changes in society in the last 200 years. What was considered boorish and vulgar in 1800 would be considered conservative behavior today. The characters in Austen's work display such subtely of thought and self-restraint that it's hard to believe that humans once acted in such a way....

The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest
The Climb: Tragic Ambitions on Everest
by Anatoli Boukreev
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.87
57 used & new from CDN$ 0.34

3.0 out of 5 stars A detailed retelling of a familiar tragedy, Dec 6 2000
In "The Climb", authors Anatoli Boukreev and G. Weston DeWalt team up to give their version of the terrible events on Mount Everest in May 1996. Readers of Jon Krakaur's "Into Thin Air" are already familiar with the outlines of this story, told from the viewpoint of another climbing team. This book is different in that it is a much more controlled, exhaustivley researched tale. In fact,the authors strain to include lots of detail, as if it was a gaduate school research paper. This detracts a little from the story, which is otherwise nicely told. Another objective of theirs was to vindicate the actions of the Russian climber Boukreev, who was criticized in Krakauer's book as being self-serving, when in fact he ended up saving several climbers' lives. There is a chapter near the end on an unrelated climb which seemed out of place, but the last chapter was very moving. Worth a read.

Ultimate High: My Everest Odyssey
Ultimate High: My Everest Odyssey
by Goran Kropp
Edition: Paperback
21 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Amazing story, curiously written, Nov. 27 2000
"Ultimate High" is a quick read, an absorbing tale, and a curious document. While I became totally engrossed in the story of Goran's bike ride and climb of Everest, I was a bit distracted by the way different voices and elements were pieced together. This really could have been 3 or 4 different books, the bike trip - 7000 miles through Europe and the Middle East, the climb of Goran, and the disaster of which much is already known. He even outlines his next adventure at the end- a trip to the Antarctic- while I was pining for more information about this story!
But my hats off to Mr. Kropp who has enormous heart and courage, and to his writer-helper for bringing this incredible tale to all of us.

Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West
Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis Thomas Jefferson and the Opening of the American West
by Stephen E. Ambrose
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.43
181 used & new from CDN$ 0.21

5.0 out of 5 stars As monumental as the trip it recalls, Nov. 22 2000
Stephen Ambrose's "Undaunted Courage" is a monumental re-telling of one of the most important tales of the founding of this country. But rather than the story of two guys with backpacks on an extended "sight-seeing" trip (which I had always believed of the "LewisandClark" story), we have the tale of a well planned military excursion deep into unexplored territory, much of it never seen even by Native Americans. Of course their official objective was to see if there was an all-water route to the Pacific ocean- which they never found. But along the way, they had some of the most amazing adventures to be found in any history book: encounters with Grizzlies, accidental shootings, men falling off cliffs... Perhaps most interesting is their interaction with the various Indian tribes, and the tales of the amazing assistance they gave the men in passing through the mountains. Although the story ends on a somewhat melancholy note, it is one that should be read by every American.

In a Sunburned Country
In a Sunburned Country
by Bill Bryson
Edition: Audio Cassette
10 used & new from CDN$ 5.41

5.0 out of 5 stars Bryson scores again, Nov. 22 2000
Bill Bryson is becoming one of the best known travel writers in the world, a reputation well-deserved. With his lastest effort "In a sunburned country", Bryson continues his original mix of history, humor, anecdote, and witty observation. As he travels around Australia, he relates stories of large, ornamental lobsters, small towns and interesting characters of the outback, and fascinating tales of the early explorers and settlers of this amazing country. And of course, his prose is some of the best being written today: intelligent, insightful, and always with the most playful humor. You can't miss with this one.

Lewis & Clark: Leading America West
Lewis & Clark: Leading America West
by Steve Otfinoski
Edition: Paperback
7 used & new from CDN$ 3.20

5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for young peoele, Sept. 14 2000
This is a highly readable, brief account of the journey of Lewis and Clark, America's premier explorers. The duo set out in 1804 at the behest of President Jefferson to see if in fact there was a "Northwest Passage" (waterway) to the West Coast, and to explore the sorrounding regions. Most fascinating are the tales of encounters with various Indian tribes, as well as the weather related hardships endured by the Corps of Discovery. Reads nicely for young people or as a general introduction to the subject for adults. The book could have used some more illustrations and maps, but otherwise nicely researched.

DOCTOR THORNE (WORDSWORTH CLASSICS)
DOCTOR THORNE (WORDSWORTH CLASSICS)
by ANTHONY TROLLOPE
Edition: Paperback
20 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't give up on this one, May 26 2000
"Dr. Thorne" is the third in the series of Barsetshire novels by Anthony Trollope. But unlike the first two, this has little to do with the politics of the Church of England. It is the tale of two lovers from different classes, and their struggle to keep their love alive in spite of social pressures to go their own ways. Unlike the first two novels, the plot starts out very slowly, with long descriptions of the history and conditions of the fictional "Greshamsbury" estate. The author even apologizes about 30 pages in for trying the patience of his readers.
While "Dr. Thorne" lacks the crispness and economy of the first two novels ("The Warden" and "Barchester Towers"), it builds to a satisfying conclusion, and the author paints his usual precise characterizations.
If you are a fan of Anthony Trollope, be patient with this one. You will be rewarded.

Barchester Towers
Barchester Towers
by Anthony Trollope
Edition: Paperback
36 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Politics knows no boundaries, April 24 2000
This review is from: Barchester Towers (Paperback)
In this amazing novel Anthony Trollope continues his saga of clergymen of the Church of England in the little town of Barsetshire. A feud erupts when a new bishop and his chaplain, Mr. Slope, demand reforms in the church service. The main players quickly line up in either the conservative or progressive camps, and spend much of their time plotting the downfall of their enemies. While this novel is often called a "comedy", that's a misnomer. It is, however, a dead-on portrait of ecclesiastical politics and manners of mid-nineteenth century England, and one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read.

Up from Slavery: An Autobiography
Up from Slavery: An Autobiography
by Booker T. Washington
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 10.80
53 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars The power of a positive thinker, Nov. 8 1999
"Up from slavery" documents the rise of Booker T. Washington, from a plantation slave to the head of Tuskegee college in Alabama. Along the way his narrative details the squalor and humiliations of his childhood and ends with a number of journalistic adulations regarding his career and speeches. It is a wonderful book, yet curious.
Unlike Frederick Douglass, the severe critic of the slaveholding South, Washington's outlook is decidedly postive. He refuses to get into any kind of individual or group bashing, but prefers to dwell on the successes of blacks, improving race relations, and the success of his school- and students. He becomes enamored of his own success on the stump, but such is the case with most ambitious, forward looking individuals. I would have liked a bit more criticism, and fewer excerpts from the newspapers of his time (regarding his speech-making ability.) His repeated refrains about service and merit (being the only true measure of a man), are sound. All in all, this is an upbeat, inspiring story from a man who truly defied the odds, and his winning attitude is sorely needed today.

To Kill a Mockingbird
To Kill a Mockingbird
by Harper Lee
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: CDN$ 9.49
155 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A story about being sane in an insane world, Oct. 26 1999
This charming story is told through the eyes of a litttle girl in Alabama during the depression. While the core plot revolves around the trial of black man accused of assaulting a white woman, there are actually a host of themes: prejudice, isolation, fear, class struggle, education and race. The hero of the book is Atticus, a kind of Ward Cleaver of the South. Atticus is the soft-spoken lawyer, the father of the narrator, who maintains his composure while others are giving in to irrational impulses like revenge or murder. His self-control and ability to empathize with others are the shining lights of this book. In an age when boorish self-expression is the dominant cultural model, the gentle compassion and wisdom of Atticus Finch remind us of another way.

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