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"superball9" (Arlington, VA, USA)

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Stop All The World Now
Stop All The World Now
Offered by bigmediadeals
Price: CDN$ 12.54
20 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars Sophomore Slump, April 3 2004
This review is from: Stop All The World Now (Audio CD)
Howie Day's story is a bit of an odd one. His debut, Australia, was recorded a song at a time for the most part. He'd tour some, make money for recording, record a song, tour some more, and make money for the next track. Which in theory isn't a bad way to record as it allows for proper road testing of songs in front of live audiences. Australia was finally completed in 2003 and Howie continued to tour non-stop pushing his release. What made a live Howie Day show unique at the time was his use and mastery of guitar pedals quite literally building up an orchestra of sound with just his voice and his acoustic guitar. Howie eventually ended up opening for acts such as Tori Amos, Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, and most recently the Barenaked Ladies. (Like Dave Matthews Band, Howie encourages not-for-profit trading recordings of his live shows.) Non-stop touring and word of mouth lead to indepedent sales of 30,000 records - virtually unheard of for an independent debut release by a new artist. Australia became the little album that could as it was eventually picked up for distribution by Epic selling an additional 100,000 copies and adding Howie Day to the label's roster with the likes of Ben Folds, Indigo Girls, Pearl Jam and Travis.
Stop All The World Now sounds sophomoric, appropriately so, and unfortunately a little overproduced. It's by no means a bad release, it just doesn't hold quite the same energy as Madrigals and even Australia. It begins well enough with perhaps the disc's three best songs. "Brace Yourself" kicks things off, and may be one of my favorite Howie tracks ever confronting the listener from the beginning with a wall of sound unheard on either of the previous releases. The first single, "Perfect Time Of Day," has received enough airplay for him to sell out the local rock club, and is more enjoyable and energetic than anything I've heard from two of his wider-known contemporaries, John Mayer and Josh Kelley. "Collide" is also another contender for best Howie song ever except it's severely limited by the rather cartoonish "doot doot doo"'s. "Collide" is also the first of several tracks on Stop to include the 25-piece London Session Orchestra, but wisely keeps the simple acoustic guitar strum that begins the song in the front of the mix with his voice. "Trouble In Here" explodes at the choruses so strongly it drowns the orchestra out of the mix, and would be a smart choice for the disc's second single. The cartoonish backing vocals that brought down "Collide" would actually help the slower "Sunday Morning Song." Immediately following is "I'll Take You On" which is perfectly appropriate for a lazy Sunday afternoon with it's gentle sway. "She Says" from Australia gets another go-round on Stop but for the life of me I can't figure out why as they don't employ the orchestra. If any song off Australia needed an orchestra treatment (other than "Ghost") it's "She Says." The new version is by no means bad, but if you're going to reinvent, reinvent. "Numbness Of Sound" sounds like it isn't fully realized in terms of its sonic texture. I keep expecting something heavier, something stronger to kick in, something a little more rock to add to his voice and the swelling string section. Stop features a more realized version version of "You & A Promise" that unfortunately, while is a great version, the added production puts a layer of separation between the listener and the track. The fade down ending to "You & A Promise" segues beautifully into the lilting "End Of Our Days." Disc closer "Come Lay Down" is a wash of effects, brooding bass, and soaring vocals. The limited edition of Stop All The World Now also includes a dvd with about thirty minutes of recording footage, interview footage, and general man-about-town footage plus a solo live piano version of "End Of Our Days."
If you're going to buy a Howie Day release, I would begin with Madrigals. It's a perfect sampling of all things Howie. If you like more produced poppier stuff, go with Stop All The World Now. Hopefully his next release will be a little more stripped down, a little more authentic, a little more original, a little more intimate. I was pretty disappointed when I saw him a few months ago at the 9:30 Club. Hopefully he'll return to what made him a little more unique.

Stop All The World Now
Stop All The World Now
Offered by CAMusicFiendz
Price: CDN$ 9.94
10 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

3.0 out of 5 stars sophomore slump, April 3 2004
This review is from: Stop All The World Now (Audio CD)
Howie Day's story is a bit of an odd one. His debut, Australia, was recorded a song at a time for the most part. He'd tour some, make money for recording, record a song, tour some more, and make money for the next track. Which in theory isn't a bad way to record as it allows for proper road testing of songs in front of live audiences. Australia was finally completed in 2003 and Howie continued to tour non-stop pushing his release. What made a live Howie Day show unique at the time was his use and mastery of guitar pedals quite literally building up an orchestra of sound with just his voice and his acoustic guitar. Howie eventually ended up opening for acts such as Tori Amos, Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, and most recently the Barenaked Ladies. (Like Dave Matthews Band, Howie encourages not-for-profit trading recordings of his live shows.) Non-stop touring and word of mouth lead to indepedent sales of 30,000 records - virtually unheard of for an independent debut release by a new artist. Australia became the little album that could as it was eventually picked up for distribution by Epic selling an additional 100,000 copies and adding Howie Day to the label's roster with the likes of Ben Folds, Indigo Girls, Pearl Jam and Travis.
Stop All The World Now sounds sophomoric, appropriately so, and unfortunately a little overproduced. It's by no means a bad release, it just doesn't hold quite the same energy as Madrigals and even Australia. It begins well enough with perhaps the disc's three best songs. "Brace Yourself" kicks things off, and may be one of my favorite Howie tracks ever confronting the listener from the beginning with a wall of sound unheard on either of the previous releases. The first single, "Perfect Time Of Day," has received enough airplay for him to sell out the local rock club, and is more enjoyable and energetic than anything I've heard from two of his wider-known contemporaries, John Mayer and Josh Kelley. "Collide" is also another contender for best Howie song ever except it's severely limited by the rather cartoonish "doot doot doo"'s. "Collide" is also the first of several tracks on Stop to include the 25-piece London Session Orchestra, but wisely keeps the simple acoustic guitar strum that begins the song in the front of the mix with his voice. "Trouble In Here" explodes at the choruses so strongly it drowns the orchestra out of the mix, and would be a smart choice for the disc's second single. The cartoonish backing vocals that brought down "Collide" would actually help the slower "Sunday Morning Song." Immediately following is "I'll Take You On" which is perfectly appropriate for a lazy Sunday afternoon with it's gentle sway. "She Says" from Australia gets another go-round on Stop but for the life of me I can't figure out why as they don't employ the orchestra. If any song off Australia needed an orchestra treatment (other than "Ghost") it's "She Says." The new version is by no means bad, but if you're going to reinvent, reinvent. "Numbness Of Sound" sounds like it isn't fully realized in terms of its sonic texture. I keep expecting something heavier, something stronger to kick in, something a little more rock to add to his voice and the swelling string section. Stop features a more realized version version of "You & A Promise" that unfortunately, while is a great version, the added production puts a layer of separation between the listener and the track. The fade down ending to "You & A Promise" segues beautifully into the lilting "End Of Our Days." Disc closer "Come Lay Down" is a wash of effects, brooding bass, and soaring vocals. The limited edition of Stop All The World Now also includes a dvd with about thirty minutes of recording footage, interview footage, and general man-about-town footage plus a solo live piano version of "End Of Our Days."
If you're going to buy a Howie Day release, I would begin with Madrigals. It's a perfect sampling of all things Howie. If you like more produced poppier stuff, go with Stop All The World Now. Hopefully his next release will be a little more stripped down, a little more authentic, a little more original, a little more intimate. I was pretty disappointed when I saw him a few months ago at the 9:30 Club. Hopefully he'll return to what made him a little more unique.

Madrigals (Ep) (5 Tracks) (W/2
Madrigals (Ep) (5 Tracks) (W/2
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 17.90
12 used & new from CDN$ 1.11

4.0 out of 5 stars Madrigals, April 3 2004
Howie Day's story is a bit of an odd one. His debut, Australia, was recorded a song at a time for the most part. He's tour some, make money for recording, record a song, and make money for the next track. Which in theory isn't a bad way to record as it allows for proper road testing of songs in front of live audiences. Australia was finally completed in 2003 and Howie continued to tour non-stop pushing his release. What made a live Howie Day show unique at the time was his use and mastery of guitar pedals quite literally building up an orchestra of sound with just his voice and his acoustic guitar. Howie eventually ended up opening for acts such as Tori Amos, Dave Matthews Band, Jack Johnson, and most recently the Barenaked Ladies. (Like Dave Matthews Band, Howie encourages not-for-profit trading recordings of his live shows.) Non-stop touring and word of mouth lead to indepedent sales of 30,000 records - virtually unheard of for an independent debut release by a new artist. Australia became the little album that could as it was eventually picked up for distribution by Epic selling an additional 100,000 copies and adding Howie Day to the label's roster with the likes of Ben Folds, Indigo Girls, Pearl Jam and Travis.
With Australia's initial release in 2000, long-time fans were clamoring for something to tide them over until the release of a new full-length, and preferably something that would showcase Howie's live show. In April 2003, Epic listened to his fans and put out The Madrigals E.P., a five-song cd and four-song live dvd. Of Madrigals and Stop All The World Now, Madrigals is a far superior effort and a better showcase for Howie's songwriting, musicianship, and voice. The title track opens the cd and would fit in well with anything on Australia with his vocals echoing over the simple guitar strum, the low bass notes, and what sounds to be a synthesized glockenspiel. Though this cut is supposedly only a demo, it sounds fully complete to my ears and is ashame was not included on Stop. Fortunately the ruminating "You & A Promise" did make it onto Stop. The best track on the release however is the Mix 6 remix of "Ghost" originally on Australia. The added etherealness with the soft use of the guitar body as percussion, the simple sustained electric guitar, and the intermittent piano notes at the end of a verse give the remix more emotional impact than its original fully fleshing out the themes of loss and loneliness. "Bunnies" and "Sorry So Sorry" were staples of his live show and are included on the dvd as well. Both tracks are perfect examples of what a live Howie show sounded like as he'd beat out a rhythm loop on his guitar, add some fingerpicking in of the higher notes on another loop, put in the bass section and ultimately a simple acoustic strum - all with his acoustic guitar. On top of that he'd loop a few different vocal tracks, throw in some echo if he needed, then trigger them at the right time via pedals at his feet creating in effect (get it, effect/effects, ha ha) a well-produced one man band. The dvd, recorded live at NYC's Bowery Ballroom, includes "Bunnies" and "Sorry So Sorry" as mentioned earlier plus live versions of "Madrigals" and "Ghost." The camera work on the dvd is nice alternating between close-ups of Howie, his guitar, the pedal work, fans singing along, and tracking and pushing shots from overhead the audience. "Ghost" is the highlight of the dvd as well as it features the best use of the pedal effects culminating with Howie taking a step back and letting them do their work without him, as if they were real live bandmates, and the repetition of the line, "In the future people will be sent to distant lands through beams of light."
If you're going to buy a Howie Day release, I would begin with Madrigals. It's a perfect sampling of all things Howie. If you like more produced poppier stuff, go with Stop All The World Now. Hopefully his next release will be a little more stripped down, a little more authentic, a little more original, a little more intimate. I was pretty disappointed when I saw him a few months ago at the 9:30 Club. Hopefully he'll return to what made him a little more unique.

Shootenanny!
Shootenanny!
Price: CDN$ 8.86
34 used & new from CDN$ 1.07

5.0 out of 5 stars yee-haw, March 15 2004
This review is from: Shootenanny! (Audio CD)
I don't think America has ever fully understood Mark Oliver Everett (aka E or Mr. E) and the music he's made as part of the EELS. Shootenanny! is the band's 5th proper release and their most accessible to date. That being said, I don't think Shootenanny! is an attempt to get America to understand the EELS or for them to start selling millions of albums, but rather the opportunity for E to do something he doesn't normally do - write your typical pop/rock song without too much of the quirkiness that marked many of the band's previous releases, and for him to break free of the image of himself as a chronically depressed genius with a knack for turning generally positive phrases, such as "I love you," into some of the most devastating and defeating words ever. (Well, losing your father, mother, and sister - all within a year - will do that to you.)
"All In A Day's Work" begins Shootenanny! with a slow snarl of an electric guitar before the ominous bass guitar and drums take over darkly marching towards E's distorted vocals. The disc's single, "Saturday Morning," ironically enough is the most typical EELS track on Shootenanny! with E's switch to an almost taunting falsetto on the chorus over Butch's pounding drums leading to a wall of distorted guitars. "Love Of The Loveless" and "Rock Hard Times" despite their titles are two of the album's most upbeat and best tracks. "Loveless" includes typical EELS signatures - that casio keyboard and a bridge that slows the song to a crawl; and "Rock Hard" is one of the best unheard pop songs of all of 2003 with its bouncy rhythm, its bright electric guitar, its whistling guitars, and its chorus of self-empowerment: "everybody knows these are rock hard times / i gotta make it through / these are rock hard times." One of my favorite couplets of last year is in "Dirty Girl" with its opening lyrics: "i like a girl with a dirty mouth / someone that i can believe." "Agony" could have been on the EELS 2001 tortured opus Electro-Shock Blues (the disc written, recorded, etc around the loss of E's family) with it's vibraphone trill giving way to solitary lower chords on the casio followed by Butch's overpowering drums and the fuzzed electric guitar cutting through it all.
"Restraining Order Blues" follows in a line of tradition for E - a song that ends in "Blues" but isn't quite bluesy: Electro-Shock Blues title track, Daisies Of The Galaxy's "Grace Kelly Blues" & "Mr. E's Beautiful Blues," Soujacker B-side "Rotten World Blues," the Holes soundtrack cut "Mighty Fine Blues," and the E-scored Levity soundtrack piece "Post-Flashback Blues." "Lone Wolf" features an organ that wouldn't be out of place if it were a pedal steel or slide guitar and "Wrong About Bobby" sounds vaguely Elliott Smith-ish. There's something lurking under the surface to "Numbered Days" that is never fully realized accentuating its view that death is always around the corner. E resorts back to the falsetto and includes a string section in "Fashion Awards," a track about the recent glut of awards shows filling our airwaves and the emotions displayed on many of their podiums. Shootenanny! closes with the optimistic "Somebody Loves You" echoing "Love Of The Loveless" and its reassurance that we've gotta take care of ourselves and even though that somebody who loves us might just be ourselves, "you're gonna make it through."
Shootenanny! is a fine album that might disappoint a few long-time EELS fans since the despair isn't as pronounced and a lot of those little touches that mark most EELS releases are gone with production focused more on that of a live band rather than highlighting a glockenspiel, handbell, Wurlitzer, or particularly interesting keyboard line. E has claimed himself as "John Paul Sartre with a Marshall stack" and he wouldn't be entirely wrong as he rocks hard in these existential times.
Fave tracks: "Love Of The Loveless," "Dirty Girl," "Rock Hard Times."

Dont Be Shallow
Dont Be Shallow
Price: CDN$ 15.09
13 used & new from CDN$ 3.27

5.0 out of 5 stars Not shallow in the slightest bit, March 10 2004
This review is from: Dont Be Shallow (Audio CD)
Dapper Norwegian wunderkind Sondre Lerche follows up his stellar debut album, *Faces Down*, with an equally winning EP split evenly between four outtakes and a handful of live tracks to form *Don't Be Shallow*. "Don't Be Shallow" and "I Know I Know" have melodies as charming as anything on *Faces Down*, albeit with a little more experimental leanings. After the opening military drum march, Lerche does Getz & Gilberto proud on "Living Lounge." "Single-hand Affairs" examines the constant quest for love, known all too well for some of us, with it's refrain of 'We should've come home in pairs / Instead we have second-hand affairs.' The last half of *Don't Be Shallow* is four live staples from Lerche's seemingly endless tour of North America in 2003 supporting acts as diverse as Nada Surf, Elvis Costello, Ed Harcourt, Jason Mraz, and Liz Phair. "Dead Passengers" loses a lot of the original's bounce but is quickly redeemed by this live take on "You Know So Well" coming off like John Cusack in Say Anything, except with a 12-string in place of a boombox. Closing off the EP is a rather brooding "Sleep On Needles" and a jazzy-croon verion of the Cole Porter classic, "Night And Day." At a youthful twenty years old, Sondre Lerche blends his flair for the international samba stylings of the past with the modern electronic accentuations of today creating a sound best described as ... postmodern lounge.
Fave tracks: "Don't Be Shallow," "Single-hand Affairs," "You Know So Well."

Avenues (6 Tracks)
Avenues (6 Tracks)
Offered by dodax-online
Price: CDN$ 4.94
14 used & new from CDN$ 4.33

4.0 out of 5 stars a 12 minute ep, Feb. 26 2004
This review is from: Avenues (6 Tracks) (Audio CD)
Just what the world needs, another spacey band from Los Angeles. Fortunately Earlimart, named after a migrant worker farm town halfway between Los Angeles and Fresno, goes beyond being just "another spacey band" manging to fill icy cold music about decay and civilization (I'm looking at you Grandaddy) with warmth and compassion. Like Grandaddy, and The Flaming Lips for that matter, Earlimart went from releasing a couple albums as a post-punk experimental art-rock band into an act that can realize quiet, hushed spaces as appropriately as more boisterous ones. Both *Everyone Down Here* (a full-length released later in 2003) and *The Avenues E.P.* were written at the same time, so it makes sense to talk of them together despite the band's ever-changing line-up, apart from frontman Aaron Espinoza, including Patrick Park, the New Folk Implosion's Russ Pollard, and Grandaddy's Jason Lytle and Jim Fairchild.
*The Avenues E.P.* was actually released prior to *Everyone Down Here* (January vs. April), and as mentioned earlier is no sonically different than the full-length. And with the similarities I see between Elliott Smith and Earlimart, you'd think "Color Bars" would be a more progressive take on the classic *Figure 8* track. "Color Bars" opens with some airy blips with various guitar fill effects before a synthesized string section enters the mix with intermittent glockenspiel accentuations then slowly building to a more traditional song ultimately closing beneath more wind effects and piano. "Susan's Husband's Gunshop" is filled with all the electrical guitar rage one would expect from a title instantly drawing domestic violence imagery to one's mind. Ironically enough, "Susan's Husband's Gunshop" should've been the title track from *EDH* with Espinoza's vocals, again reminiscent of E from the eels on this track, singing the chorus: "and everyone down here is blown apart." "Interloper" continues with Earlimart's tradition of slow build from simple acoustic strum and mild drum beat to something a little more futuristic sounding slowly adding effects and tinkering with the vocals. The untitled track on Avenues is reminiscent of classic Jon Brion with it's slow chime (think *Boogie Nights*), military march drum snares and tinkered tack piano greeted with early morning birds and an occasional higher octave piano arpeggio. Closing *The Avenues E.P.* is "Parking Lots," a brief minute-and-a-half snippet that is supposed to be a complete song but sounds fully unrealized in this context.
The production on *The Avenues E.P.* is topnotch - each instrument or effect feels like it belongs and that something would sadly be missing if it was absent. The subtle mixture of acoustic guitars and untreated drums laced with the more technologically advanced effects, often beginning in the background before slowly making their way to the fore of the mix, create this warm texture missing from so many of their genre compatriots. *The Avenues E.P.* lacks the epic feel to Grandaddy's *The Sophtware Slump* and latest outing, *Sumday,* but they should not go unnoticed because of it. Sometimes the best things come in the smallest, most unassuming packages.
Fave tracks: "Color Bars," "Interloper," untitled #4.

Everyone Down Here
Everyone Down Here
Price: CDN$ 16.13
17 used & new from CDN$ 1.35

4.0 out of 5 stars Never Too Late for Earlimart, Feb. 26 2004
This review is from: Everyone Down Here (Audio CD)
Just what the world needs, another spacey band from Los Angeles. Fortunately Earlimart, named after a migrant worker farm town halfway between Los Angeles and Fresno, goes beyond being just "another spacey band" manging to fill icy cold music about decay and civilization (I'm looking at you Grandaddy) with warmth and compassion. Like Grandaddy, and The Flaming Lips for that matter, Earlimart went from releasing a couple albums as a post-punk experimental art-rock band into an act that can realize quiet, hushed spaces as appropriately as more boisterous ones. Both *Everyone Down Here* and *The Avenues E.P.* (a slightly earlier release) were written at the same time, so it makes sense to talk of them together despite the band's ever-changing line-up, apart from frontman Aaron Espinoza, including Patrick Park, the New Folk Implosion's Russ Pollard, and Grandaddy's Jason Lytle and Jim Fairchild.
*Everyone Down Here* is basically the best record the eels didn't release last year. Imagine a studio jam session between E from the eels, Elliott Smith, and Grandaddy - and you have Earlimart. Lasting only 32 and some minutes, *EDH* gives you just enough to get sucked in before coming to a close. The album opens up with the slow build of guitars on "We're So Happy (We Left The Piano In The Truck)" before another distorted guitar comes in with the melody line giving way to a falling effect and what could best be descibed as those sonar deep sea pings you hear in those submarine movies with a dash of echo thrown in just for kicks. The track closes in with some childish humming before the familar strum of "We Drink On The Job" kicks in. Clearly the disc's single, "Drink," complete with cowbell and spacey swirling guitars is as close to "pop" as Earlimart comes. "The Movies" could've been one of Elliott Smith's lost tunes with it's slow minor piano beginning before filling in with soft drums, guitar, and what I'm going to call just an 'air organ.' Coming on slowly after "The Movies" is the ninety-second "Lost At Sea" catching up on Earlimart's origins with its punk rock swirls and distorted vocals followed by a thirty-second untitled re-take on "Lost At Sea." "Burning The Cow" harkens back to "We Drink On The Job" and sounds more inline with Grandaddy's less introspective moments on The Sophtware Slump with its power-art-rock chords, distorted guitar, and choruses. The distance effects on "Hospital" contrasting with the bright organ line only heighten the despair and segues perfectly into "Lazy Feet 23." "LF23" opens with a simple acoustic guitar strum backed by that high-pitched CB static common to supernatural phenomena and trucker movies. "Big Ol' Black" and "Dreaming Of..." are reminiscent of "The Movies" with its focus on the slightly out-of-tune piano off in the distance. Another untitled track of effects, watery piano, and distorted sci-fi chimes (think of the sound the cosmic key made from The Masters Of The Universe movie) leads into the elegiac disc closer, "Night, Nite" with its combination of watery piano, distorted guitar, and simple drum charge.
The production on *Everyone Down Here* is topnotch - each instrument or effect feels like it belongs and that something would sadly be missing if it was absent. The subtle mixture of acoustic guitars and untreated drums laced with the more technologically advanced effects, often beginning in the background before slowly making their way to the fore of the mix, create this warm texture missing from so many of their genre compatriots. *Everyone Down Here* lacks the epic feel to Grandaddy's *The Sophtware Slump* and latest outing, *Sumday,* but they should not go unnoticed because of it. Sometimes the best things come in the smallest, most unassuming packages.
Fave tracks: "We Drink On The Job," "The Movies," "Lazy Feet 23."

Rock N Roll
Rock N Roll
Price: CDN$ 14.11
36 used & new from CDN$ 1.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Rolling with the Rock, Feb. 17 2004
This review is from: Rock N Roll (Audio CD)
So I wasn't expecting to like Ryan Adams or *Rock N Roll*...but I do...and wished I'd actually gotten this earlier in the year...okay, well, thanks to a friend, I got the disc before it came out but didnt get around to listening to it until December. I'd heard so much about self-proclaimed and one-time critically-acclaimed rock god Ryan Adams but I never bought into the hype. Another friend had burned me a couple of tracks on mix cds and they didn't grab me. I was impressed by his CMT Crossroads performance with Elton John, but not enough to actually go out and purchase anything. Normally I'm pretty disappointed by everything heralded by so many people and the critics taste...a common taste is hardly ever a good taste, so I thought it wise to stay away from All Things Adams - Ryan himself, Whiskeytown, The Finger, Jesse Malin, Caitlin Cary. The critical backlash he seemed to get leading up to the release of *Rock N Roll* (and that much talked about declined invitation to perform "Summer of '69") piqued my interest more than anything else. You could imagine my pleasant surprise when I got around to listening to *Rock N Roll* and was greeted with a good 'ol bit of dirty rock. Normally, dirty rock isn't my thing, but something about this pulled me in and had me hooked from the beginning with just enough sleaze to lure this gritty virgin from the dark pop alley into the red light brothel of rock. It helps that *RNR* opens with it's six best tracks. Much has been said about "This Is It" being a send-up of The Strokes' similarly titled "Is This It" and I really have nothing new to add to this matter. "Wish You Were Here" originally struck me as the most melodic track on the disc. "So Alive" is one of the most anthemic songs to come about in recent memory with its churning electric guitar line followed by the infinitely catchy "Luminol." I am rather surprised by how much I enjoy Adams voice, wounded from the years of binge drinking, drug abuse, and heartbreak but still soldiering through life. Maybe it didn't help Adams reputation that America's indie film queen and his (current) girlfriend, Parker Posey, exe"cute"ive produced Rock N Roll, in addition to co-writing and singing backup on "Note To Self: Don't Die;" her input though seems minimal on this track, her voice indistinguishable from any other backing vocal track. "Note To Self" is followed by the simple title track as Adams keeps it acoustic with just his piano and bass guitar. On "Rock N Roll" he sings in his most hushed voice the laments of love and fame closing the track with a voice mail message of the girl he loves, longing for him, skipping like a record. The track that has grown on me the most and has become perhaps my favorite is "Anybody Wanna Take Me Home." Two of the most widely acclaimed tracks by fans, "Do Miss America" and "Boys," actually do the least for me on this disc than any of the others. "Do Miss America" sounds a little John Cougar-ish (before he became John Cougar Mellencamp, and then just John Mellencamp). Would I be as excited about Ryan Adams if I had received any of his solo, Whiskeytown, or other related project discs first? Maybe not. But having listened to his grungier side, I am definitely going to see what his cleaned-up (or relatively cleaned-up, this is Ryan Adams still) and more refined act is like on his earlier discs.

Jennie Bomb
Jennie Bomb
Offered by cdbasement canada
Price: CDN$ 3.99
11 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Jennie Bomb, Feb. 1 2004
This review is from: Jennie Bomb (Audio CD)
Sahara Hotnights might be the latest Swedish import but they certainly mark themselves as one of the best. These four ladies bring classic punk rock hooks with just enough of a pop sensibility to make them more palatable to the masses and easier to digest than other like-minded Scandinavian bands - The Hives and The International Noise Conspiracy. *Jennie Bomb* certainly makes the aforementioned boys jealous of the girls' firepower instantly exploding with eleven songs in thirty-two minutes. "On Top Of The World" and "Fire Alarm" are from the punk album No Doubt never made as lead singer Maria Andersson comes off as a prettier Joan Jett fronting the Ramones. Sahara Hotnights are posed to break big with *Jennie Bomb* and it won't be long until their name is mentioned with the same reverence of other grrrl rawkers Sleater Kinney and L7.

Jennie Bomb
Jennie Bomb
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 22.95
7 used & new from CDN$ 7.51

4.0 out of 5 stars Jennie Bomb, Feb. 1 2004
This review is from: Jennie Bomb (Audio CD)
Sahara Hotnights might be the latest Swedish import but they certainly mark themselves as one of the best. These four ladies bring classic punk rock hooks with just enough of a pop sensibility to make them more palatable to the masses and easier to digest than other like-minded Scandinavian bands - The Hives and The International Noise Conspiracy. *Jennie Bomb* certainly makes the aforementioned boys jealous of the girls' firepower instantly exploding with eleven songs in thirty-two minutes. "On Top Of The World" and "Fire Alarm" are from the punk album No Doubt never made as lead singer Maria Andersson comes off as a prettier Joan Jett fronting the Ramones. Sahara Hotnights are posed to break big with *Jennie Bomb* and it won't be long until their name is mentioned with the same reverence of other grrrl rawkers Sleater Kinney and L7.

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