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neurotome "neurotome" (San Luis Obispo, CA)

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Practical Statistics for Medical Research
Practical Statistics for Medical Research
by Douglas G. Altman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 112.02
34 used & new from CDN$ 79.98

5.0 out of 5 stars The best book I've found on the topic!, Dec 19 2003
This book was the text for the intro to Biostat class at Columbia University this year. It is lucid, well organized, doesn't bog down in details or equations, and gives a good introductory explanation of the basic statistical methods, their rationale for use, and their various assumptions and shortcomings.
I can't imagine trying to do stats without a copy of this book beside me - I'd be lost. If you're in need of a book to help you understand medical statistics as they are presented in the literature, you should use this book and eschew all others.

Atlas of Human Anatomy, Student Edition
Atlas of Human Anatomy, Student Edition
by Frank H. Netter
Edition: Paperback
15 used & new from CDN$ 18.28

5.0 out of 5 stars The finest clinical anatomy atlas available., Sept. 15 2003
Frank Netter's atlas compiles his paintings of every imaginable human body part, seen in various degrees of dissection, into one volume. Dr. Netter's talent for reproducing the facts of anatomy is exquisite and unquestionable. However, as one looks a little deeper, it becomes clear that Netter is in fact a guru of function as well. Nerves, outlined in an unearthly yellow, terminate on muscles they actually innervate. Tendinous insertions are always on the correct part of bony protuberances, and fiber direction is always carefully detailed. Any unusual functional variances, such as the dual sympathetic/parasympathetic function of Vidian's nerve, or such as the pulley effect on the trochlear nerve, are always painstakingly pointed out. Netter also excels in variation, presenting, for example, 11 normal variants of the cystic and hepatic ducts.
The alternatives are few and inadequate. Pernkopf is often cited as Netter's chief rival; his experimentation on living persons incarcerated in Nazi concentration camps forbids me from perusing his text, on ethical grounds. Grant's atlas is laughably inadequate by comparison, both in number and quality of the plates. And Gray's, the old standby, simply cannot measure up; Netter's bold colors and functional depictions are clearly superior.
Rohen and Yokochi, a photographic atlas, offers the advantage of being photographs of superb dissections, and therefore more like what one encounters in the anatomy lab. Some find it useful as a supplement to Netter's atlas. I also used Moore's textbook of anatomy; the plates, from Grant's atlas, are not so good, but the text can be used to expand and illuminate on the relevant plates in Netter's, and the text is well written and clear. I found it indispensible to read a little bit about what I was looking at, the night before an anatomy lab.
I have also lent my Netter to several artists (sculptors and painters,) all of whom found it to be quite useful.
If you have any interest in human anatomy, then, you need a copy of Netter today!

Swanson's Family Practice Review
Swanson's Family Practice Review
by Alfred F. Tallia
Edition: Paperback
17 used & new from CDN$ 8.18

1.0 out of 5 stars Out of date! Beware., July 14 2003
Several years ago, word was out that this was the book to use for Step 3 review. That may have been the case, but it is no longer. I saw this book was out in a 4th (2001) edition, so assumed it would be up to 2001 standard of care. Unfortunately, each section ends with a couple of references, and most of these were dated from 1992-1996.
When I saw penicillin G recommended as S. pneumonia treatment, my red flag went up (30% of community S. pneumonia isolates were Pen-resistant in 2000), and when I saw cisapride recommended as definitive treatment for heartburn - well, that drug's been off the market for safety reasons for 2 years. So I closed the book - I'm a neurologist, I can't be expected to know what *else* is out of date in here!
I realize that Swanson's multiple choice format is no longer appropriate to the new patient-oriented boards, but I was surprised to discover such out-of-date content, too, in a book ostensibly dated 2001. USMLE Step takers and all other physicians, purchase and read only with great caution - I suggest using a different book.

Earth Inferno Live
Earth Inferno Live
Offered by BonnieScotland
Price: CDN$ 9.92
17 used & new from CDN$ 7.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Live dark metal from the edge of the apocalypse, June 19 2003
This review is from: Earth Inferno Live (Audio CD)
This is the most incredible live album I've ever heard. None of FoTN's studio albums moved me that much, but this is incredible - a record of not just a concert, but a seance, a spell, a happening of epic proportions. Carl McCoy's fluid, shifting takes on his own Crowley-inspired lyrics weave an incredible luminance over a blasted psychotic landscape.
If you like dark metal you'll find this album a revelation. I can't recommend it enough.

Bicycling Magazine's Complete Guide to Bicycle Maintenance and Repair: Over 1,000 Tips, Tricks, and Techniques to Maximize Performance, Minimize Repairs, and Save Money
Bicycling Magazine's Complete Guide to Bicycle Maintenance and Repair: Over 1,000 Tips, Tricks, and Techniques to Maximize Performance, Minimize Repairs, and Save Money
by Jim Langley
Edition: Paperback
32 used & new from CDN$ 1.72

5.0 out of 5 stars Read this *before* you buy a bike!, Aug. 20 2002
I've just gotten a new bike, and this book was my bible along the rocky road to buying a bike. Technology's come a long way in the 15 years since I last bought a bike, and I was starting from nearly zero - I didn't know my top tube from my seat stay.
This book covers the basics of what bicycle components are, what they do when they're working right, and how they can fail. I'm not someone who does a lot of "wrenching" on his own bike, but I found I needed to read this whole book in order to make an informed bike-buying decision. What do the tradeoffs between strength and lightness in wheelsets really mean with respect to your riding style? Do you need to go for the more expensive bottom bracket? (Probably not.) What's a 'headset', and why does it need to be covered up when you're transporting the bike on the back of a car?
This book will answer all the questions you had about the makeup and operation of a bike, but more importantly, it'll answer the questions you didn't know enough to ask, and help you make the best-informed bike buying decision possible!

Bicycling Magazine's Complete Book of Road Cycling Skills: Your Guide to Riding Faster, Stronger, Longer, and Safer
Bicycling Magazine's Complete Book of Road Cycling Skills: Your Guide to Riding Faster, Stronger, Longer, and Safer
by Ben Hewitt
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.16
84 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

4.0 out of 5 stars Cobbled together, but a comprehensive guide, Aug. 20 2002
As a long-time car driver who just made the 'switch' to cycle commuting, I had a lot of anxieties regarding safe and intelligent operation of a bicycle on roads shared with automobiles. This book served the purpose admirably and got me riding safe and sane on the streets of Manhattan, something I wouldn't have believed possible a couple months ago.
There are sections on how to equip your bike, how to follow the rules of the road, and tips and tricks bikers need to know to coexist safely in traffic. There are also sections on what to eat and drink, how to train effectively to increase your abilities, and how to get into serious long-distance touring - things which I hadn't originally been interested in but which were fun to read about. I think what I liked best about the book was that it was clearly written by enthusiasts who've spent a lot of time riding and a lot of time thinking about how to convey their skills and enthusiasms to the public.
If I had a criticism, it'd be that the book suffers by being a collection of separate magazine articles not originally intended for publication in this form, so some information is repeated and coherence is sort of loose. But it's not a major criticism and I'd recommend the book anyway.

A Deepness in the Sky
A Deepness in the Sky
by Vernor Vinge
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: CDN$ 9.89
66 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars In the grand old style of SF, Aug. 20 2002
First, I have to say that I didn't think they made Authors like this anymore. Vinge apparently has a computer science background, but he's no slouch at physics and biology either, and his deft touch with the hard science as well as the literary aspects of setting, character and plot make him simply a delight to read.
As a work of speculative fiction, Vinge shows the influence of Heinlein and Niven, but at his best he comes through with the erratic brilliance of Alfred Bester - especially in the extreme machinations of some of his more evil, yet believably self-interested human characters, who squabble for power and position even as their technologically advanced little spaceship-worlds are (literally) falling apart around them.
As a work of allegory, Vinge shows us a race of alien Spiders who in fact have much in common with 21st century Earth culture, and the book works on this level, too.
I'd recommend this book without reservation to anyone who loves great SF!

Post Captain
Post Captain
by Patrick O'Brian
Edition: Paperback
123 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A delicate hand at history, Sept. 24 2001
This review is from: Post Captain (Paperback)
About a third of the way through Post Captain, I began to grow a little impatient. "Why can't Aubrey and Maturin get to sea again," I wondered. "All this gallivanting around, dodging bill collectors, competing for the affections of rose-cheeked English lasses - it wears on one." But after reading about the press gangs, the foxes and hounds, the merchant class and their conduct at parties, it became clear that O'Brian had widened his narrative scope. No longer would this series be merely about two men and their friendship aboard a fighting ship; the author couldn't be content with reproducing the prior success of "Master and Commander."
And in fact, one gains a rich and carefully-crafted vision of the times and the customs of 1803 England, just before and after the breaking of the Peace of Amiens. Though the novel is imbued with history, you needn't refer to a textbook if your recall is rusty - O'Brian takes you there, he shows rather than tells, and in the end you'll feel like you'd lived through the historical moment in question, along with the good Captain and his faithful Doctor. A very pleasant way to take your history.
I especially liked the part where Aubrey finds a dermoid, carefully concealed in Maturin's pistol holster! What a character!

Way of Life
Way of Life
by Osler
Edition: Hardcover
10 used & new from CDN$ 5.72

5.0 out of 5 stars Life in day-tight compartments., Sept. 23 2001
This review is from: Way of Life (Hardcover)
Dale Carnegie and Stephen Covey, to name two self-help authors, were quite impressed with Dr. Osler's plan for a happy, successful life, which is summed up by the maxim: "Live in day-tight compartments." Full of flowery classical references, Dr. Osler's speech to the Yale graduating class of 1913 remains pleasant and inspirational, and if you'd like to know just a little bit more about Osler than his physical sign of endocarditis, it makes a fun read.
It's a "charming little book," practically new-polished with the rough pumice stone (reading Ivy League commencement addresses makes me quote Catullus. So sue me) - and it's pretty, bound in tan vinyl. I really would take exception to the type face, though, a too-cute number called Goudy Mediæval. It looks like something an old lady fond of antimacassars would call 'elegant.'
Would make a super gift for a college - or med school - grad!

The Iron Dragon's Daughter
The Iron Dragon's Daughter
by Michael Swanwick
Edition: Paperback
16 used & new from CDN$ 2.11

5.0 out of 5 stars Pixie dust and guided missiles!, Aug. 30 2001
This is a crazy romp through nearly-uncharted waters - although if you're a fan of Mark Shepherd's "Elvendude," you'll be familiar with the rather nutty concept of mixing a Judy Blume-style Young Adult plot with a bunch of Little People.
To Swanwick's credit, his hip young fairies, dwarves, elves, trolls, and whatnot (there's dozens of species) are believable, even when they're snorting pixie dust in the back seat of a limo and listening to modern elven rock. But this isn't their story - it's the story of a young changeling, a human girl-child taken from her cradle to work in a cramped, Dickensian factory.
Well, except that this factory makes sentient, highly evil missile-launching 'iron dragons' - fighter planes, in a magickal way. The novel really begins when one of these enters our heroine's life, and plans out a glorious escape - or a blackmailed kidnapping, depending on your point of view. Then , we follow her struggles to find her own identity and discover her past - the various plot twists will leave you shaking your head in stunned amusement, except for the ending, which simply cries out for a sequel.
If you're not turned off yet, I highly recommend picking this inventive and offbeat novel up for a read. You won't be disappointed.

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