Profile for W Boudville > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by W Boudville
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,107
Helpful Votes: 94

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Amazon Communities.

Reviews Written by
W Boudville (Terra, Sol 3)

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
HP Vertica Essentials
HP Vertica Essentials
Price: CDN$ 14.39

4.0 out of 5 stars colu, June 7 2014
For decades HP has been doing seminal work in computing. It is nice to see them at the top of their game with this offering in Massively Parallel Processing [MPP]. As the text explains, the rise of Big Data requires the ability to distribute the workload across many machines. Vertica's key differentiating feature, at least to me, is its use of column storage, instead of row storage as in most databases.

The accessing of entire rows in traditional database processing can be extremely inefficient if the SQL query only needs to operate on a few columns. The unused column data that is retrieved is a total waste. Vertica uses the concept of projections. So a query that explicitly accesses only a few fields [columns], which is typical of many queries, leads to far more efficient and faster processing.

The book also has explanations of ancillary Vertica management operations. Like doing full and incremental backups. Or uploading a massive amount of data. As you might expect, HP has done a competent job in fleshing out these features.

Using this book does require some background in the theory of relational databases. One side benefit about learning Vertica is that you can now look at traditional databases like MySql, Oracle 11g and SQL Server in a deeper level of understanding.

Implementing Cloud Storage with OpenStack Swift
Implementing Cloud Storage with OpenStack Swift
Price: CDN$ 14.39

4.0 out of 5 stars o, June 6 2014
Cloud storage is one of these new ideas that has gained incredible traction. Take the startups Box, DropBox and GitHub as the best known examples. Maybe you have an idea for another startup that will use cloud storage. Now the book explains how using Swift,

It gives an objective explanation of the pros and cons of going with cloud storage. Simply put, there are 3 main factors, reliability, cost and performance. Cloud storage can do the first 2 well, but can deeply lag on performance. If you think about it, the latter should not be a surprise. Physically putting the data in the cloud means migrating it from your data center or your company's desktops and laptops. Ultimately, the speed of light acts as the restriction. Compounded by necessary delays imposed by electronics. So the book cautions you to be aware of this limitation ab initio. It advises cogently that you should not use the cloud for high performance computing, especially for high throughput transactions. For these, you need your disks as close to the main CPUs as possible.

The text describes how Swift can give an origin server that feeds into a Content Delivery Network [CDN]. The latter is now an entire subindustry in its own right. If you have ambitions tending there, Swift and the text can aid you.

Useful too is how the text shows compatibility with Amazon S3. Amazon Web Services have a huge presence in the web services and cloud space. Chances are that you might already have commitments to using S3. Integration can then be a huge issue.

Learning Objective-C by Developing iPhone Games
Learning Objective-C by Developing iPhone Games
by Amy M. Booker
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 57.04
6 used & new from CDN$ 54.61

4.0 out of 5 stars st, June 6 2014
Hmm, as I write this I just heard that Apple has introduced another language as the preferred one going forward for developing for the iPhone. Objective C will be deprecated ! Not through any deficiency of this book. The authors do a good job explaining nicely the virtues and ease of coding in Objective C via the IDE of Xcode.

So there is a meta question to be decided by you. Do you want to commit your resources to this language or transition to the new one. At least if you decide to stick with Objective C, try this book as a useful supporting explanatory text.

It takes you through the frameworks and APIs furnished by Apple. Along with a detailed introduction to the concepts of object oriented programming. For the readers new to OO, the emphasis here is on graphical code that uses OO. Which may be easier than working through more abstract OO examples, where you are dealing with non-graphical data structures.

The book shows how to make a program from parts that access each other via interfaces. The structure hiding of classes and the deliberate restriction of access to a class's members via the interface is a crucial idea in all OO coding, regardless of language.

Of necessity, the text's game examples are toy snippets. No space to do any extended coding. But if you are imaginative, these are still great starting points for your ideas.

Vmware Esxi 5.1 Cookbook
Vmware Esxi 5.1 Cookbook
by Mohammed Raffic Kajamoideen
Edition: Paperback
10 used & new from CDN$ 59.67

4.0 out of 5 stars n, May 23 2014
Ce commentaire est de: Vmware Esxi 5.1 Cookbook (Paperback)
Virtual machines are a great boon to efficiently using your data center hardware. The authors of this book help you with detailed guidance on the management of ESXi. The underlying complexity of VMware can be appreciated by the amount of detail about what you can do.

Just as one example, suppose you have several VMs on the same physical machine. And other VMs on other physical machines in a given physical network. A switch implemented in software is provided by VMware to let you talk between all these VMs. There is operational backward compatibility because the commands or procedures largely mimic the system administration of physical switches. So any prior experience by you can be leveraged with a shallow learning curve.

Another exhancement that can prove useful is vSphere Distributed Switch. It saves you from having to make a software switch on each host. The promise is that vDS spans multiple hosts. This could have been intricate to manage. But the text explains that vDS was split into 2 logical parts. A data plane or I/O plane, which does the actual packet switching. And the management plane or control plane. Likely you will spend more time on the latter.

Further topics are divulged by the text. All potentially very useful to you as a VM or data center adminstrator.

Alfresco CMIS
Alfresco CMIS
Price: CDN$ 9.99

4.0 out of 5 stars in, May 10 2014
Ce commentaire est de: Alfresco CMIS (Kindle Edition)
You surely know about Content Management Systems [CMS]. What this book explains is a solution to the plethora of CMSs that arose in recent years. Different vendors have rolled their own. With the result that corporate end users sometimes have several CMSs, often incompatible in how they input and output data. The CMIS is the interoperable standard and web based, using standard http queries. Which means it can pass through most firewalls, instead of being a custom and unknown message or using a non-standard port number.

The book's discussion makes clear that Alfresco and CMIS means that your Alfresco system can now talk [relatively] easily with other CMS, like Drupal or SharePoint. The elementary CMIS operations are covered, with some examples. Verbose XML, but you should be accustomed to that by now.

Of the advanced CMIS operations, one is the means to handle Access Control Lists. Some readers will consider this to be a necessary and basic operation. [If your background is mainframes or large data centers.]

Of Alfresco itself, only in chapter 4 does the text go into details about how Alfresco has incorporated a changing CMIS standard. One complication to which you should pay attention is the impedance difference between the CMIS object model and how Alfresco does its object referencing. The book warns that this can be tricky to understand.

Several of the operations are the equivalent of you manipulating files in a file system. You know how to do this on the command line or via icons. Operations like updating folders and documents, including deleting those objects. Well, the book describes the equivalent when you go through CMIS. New steps, yes, but quite understandable based on earlier simpler experiences.

Cassandra Design Patterns
Cassandra Design Patterns
Price: CDN$ 9.99

4.0 out of 5 stars provi, May 4 2014
To me the most useful part of this somewhat skimpy book is the table of features of Cassandra. Usefully placed at the start, in chapter 1. It shows at a glance the items, with their antecedants in Google BigTable and Amazon Dynamo. The chapter provides a succinct recap of the basic ideas behind those 2 commercial approaches. We get the big picture of the CAP theorem. This provides the theoretical context for understanding BigTable, Dynamo and Cassandra itself.

Granted, some readers will be frustrated with the modica of details furnished in the chapter. You may have to use this to extract search terms and look online for more information.

The remainder of the text delves into the Cassandra patterns for efficient writes and reads. Well, it is a change from most books on general purpose design patterns. Those cited here are indeed specialised. This is the book's value. It's not about generic patterns.

One particular pattern is intriguing. How to integrate with higher level analytics. Cassandra is motivated primarily for real time transactions. Analytics is typically and necessarily batch oriented. Too computationally intensive to do in anything approaching real time. Well, turns out one pattern lets you link to Hadoop, which is strong at those batch analytics. But the discussion of this is frustratingly sparse. More could have been written here.

Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript
Building Web and Mobile ArcGIS Server Applications with JavaScript
Price: CDN$ 14.57

4.0 out of 5 stars inher, May 3 2014
Nice that the author actually takes the time to remind you to put comments in your code. The majority of programmers barely deign to comment. In no small way, this contributes to the ongoing cost of code maintenance. When another programmer has to try to decipher the intent of your code. So of all the book's advice, perhaps you could take this to heart first?

The ArcGIS is quite useful. As the book's many examples can attest. Good too is how the text has plentiful screen captures of mapping applications. The inherent visual nature of mapping lends itself well to the documentation and the understandability of this book. Compared to, say, a text on web servers and design patterns, where the context is more abstract and ditto with the figures.

You should and must use data layers in your map. Luckily, the API for javascript offers several classes to make this possible. At least as attested by the book's examples, using those classes seems straightforward. Some serious effort was probably expended by the authors of those classes to make it so.

Chapter 5 goes into value added aspects of geocoding. You do not need to waste your time implementing routine GIS features like zoom and pan. There are now widgets that can be invoked in your application to do this and other common tasks. So you can focus on adding unique value. Also, by not having to code those widgets, you reduce the chances of bugs. It is a safe assumption that those widgets have been extensively tested.

Learning Pentesting for Android Devices
Learning Pentesting for Android Devices
Price: CDN$ 9.99

4.0 out of 5 stars de, May 3 2014
Android is the most popular phone operating system in the world, measured by unit volume. Probably also by total revenue. Apple gets more profit per handset, but sells fewer. Developers of Android applications should be aware of how to protect against intrusion. The first chapter is just a run through of the layout of the operating system. A version of linux optimised for mobile platforms.

It might help if you already have developed for a virtual machine environment. Since each application runtime instance runs within its own VM. But the point of divergence from laptop or desktop VMs is that here the VM framework is used for performance and not security. In large part, the rest of the book flows from this observation.

Eclipse is the development platform used. Good, because it is free and heavily tested and maintained. Turns out, it has an option, that makes an Android Virtual Machine Device Manager. This runs an Android virtual device. So you develop and test on a desktop with emulation. The text takes you through how all this can be done, with simple examples. Of these, take careful note of the Burp proxy. It can sniff [analyse] the network traffic. This is an important way to find vulnerabilities in an application. An entire chapter goes into other ways to do traffic analysis. Passive and active. The latter is a little harder maybe. But it lets you debug by stepping through the stages of a given network interaction between an app and its server.

Another very useful tool is for reverse engineering an existing Android app. If you have coded in java, you may be aware of programs to do likewise for java bytecode. Conceptually, it's the same idea for Android.

Java EE 7 with GlassFish 4 Application Server
Java EE 7 with GlassFish 4 Application Server
Price: CDN$ 18.14

4.0 out of 5 stars more, May 2 2014
The book starts off with an overview, perhaps necessary, of the so-called Java EE and GlassFish. What's the big deal? Well, there has been a corporate reshuffling and relabelling. What was for over 10 years J2EE [Java 2 Enterprise Edition] is now just Java EE [Enterprise Edition]. And the venerable JBoss, hailing from 1999 or earlier, is now WildFly [sic]. I kid you not. RedHat, which owns JBoss, decided on a seriously variant relabelling. At least we are told that GlassFish is the official Java EE 7 implementation. Whew!

The point is that you are urged to use GlassFish version 4.0 [or newer perhaps by the time you read this], is that it lets you debug your codebase against official specs. For example, the long chapter 2 looks at Java Server Faces and Ajax. As well as coding to HTML 5, to make markups and have JSF parts being instantiated as HTML 5 pages.

Another chapter takes us into Java Persistence API [JPA]. Which is an object oriented compatible way to easily get at data in a relational database. The code snippets have a slew of import statements for JPA. The usual necessary verbiage. A talented programmer might wonder how to simplify such boilerplate, for that is what it is, in a future better version. The snippets often also have getters and setters. Trivial to understand. Perhaps too trivial. You could reasonably wonder if the author might have refrained from providing these examples. Too much space is wasted on them. More effort would have been better spent on more non-trivial snippets.

Ok, in later chapters, we do see comments like "getters and setters omitted for brevity". Good.

Social Media Mining with R
Social Media Mining with R
Price: CDN$ 9.99

4.0 out of 5 stars q, May 2 2014
In statistical analysis, R is now the de facto standard, at least at many universities. You can readily find texts explaining how to use R for general purposes. In contrast, the current book focuses on taking R for social media mining. Chapter 2 is a too brief walkthrough of the syntax of R. I recommend if you are indeed new to R to find a lengthier text explaining R itself.

Chapter 3 is where the book gets into the specifics of social data extraction. Using Twitter as a case study. Nicely at least thus far, you can get a free developer account. Don't know how long Twitter will allow this. But even if you have to pay, it may still be worthwhile. But the chapter shows how you can rapidly go some preliminary analyses, aided crucially by functions prebuilt in R.

Another chapter warns of the shortcomings of trying to quantify sentiment from such sources as a Twitter data feed. There are certain features unique to Twitter. The 140 character hard limit means that writers are forced to concentrate on the message. Less verbosity than in a blog or other type of web page. The text also introduces you to the concept [and indeed the necessity] of a lexicon. And of using Bayes classifiers. The book really just touches on a vast topic. But hopefully you get the gist of how R can do this.

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20