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Christopher Locke (Boulder, CO USA)
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Red Grooms
Red Grooms
by Marco Livingstone
Edition: Hardcover
35 used & new from CDN$ 19.65

5.0 out of 5 stars Hippodrome Hardware revisited, July 9 2004
This review is from: Red Grooms (Hardcover)
There is more life and awed-amazement-at-the-world in Red Grooms' work than you will find in any given 10,000 snotty galleries and overstuffed museums. And yes, Virginia, it really is art, but it's OK to laugh. Buy this book and renew your faith in... well, in Western Culture, if you insist. This stuff is So Cool! (Plus Arthur Danto is no mean critic, so that doesn't hurt any either.)

101 Lies Men Tell Women --- And Why Women Believe Them
101 Lies Men Tell Women --- And Why Women Believe Them
by Dory Hollander
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 11.51
44 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A Work of Impeccable Scholarship, May 26 2004
Dolly Hollander, Ph.D., has done us all a great service by delivering the deep insight and principled fairness that inform this book. 101 Lies Men Tell Women tells us something we all need to know, and constantly remember, about men: they are deceitful, unreliable and intrinsically malicious. Dr. Hollander is to be commended for pointing this out in language that is sure to inspire, enthrall and enlighten. I cannot say enough good things about this book. It is simply brilliant. As a man myself, I can confirm that men lie constantly. We can't help it. It's our nature. If you doubt it for even a second, reread this review!

Attachment Theory and Psychoanalysis
Attachment Theory and Psychoanalysis
by Peter Fonagy
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 21.42
19 used & new from CDN$ 19.41

5.0 out of 5 stars not the same material as in the Handbook of Attachment, Dec 31 2003
The previous reviewer says: 'Scholars who have read Fonagy's chapter in "The Handbook of Attachment" will recognize this material (read: the book is a bound version of the chapter.)'
This is not correct. While there may be considerable overlap in some sections, the chapter in the Handbook is some 30 pages, while the book contains over 250. The chapter ends with Daniel Stern, while this book (as you can see by looking in the table of contents) continues beyond Stern. I am particularly interested to note that Fonagy's book (but not his chapter for the Handbook) covers Stephen A. Mitchell, who was a truly great mind with a deeply compassionate heart. I highly recommend any and all of his books, but be careful: Amazon's search engine does not distinguish between "Stephen A. Mitchell" (the noted psychoanalyst) and "Stephen Mitchell" (the New Age mystic wannabe). Jeff Bezos, are you listening?
At any rate, I bought the Handbook of Attachment based on the mistaken information in the review directly below. I'm not sorry I did; it's excellent -- and MASSIVE at over 900 pages. Great stuff. Now I've also ordered Fonagy's Attachment Theory and Psychoanalysis and expect it to be five-stars-plus based on the *shorter* version in the Handbook. If you can't afford to buy both, don't be misled by the previous reviewer's misunderstanding. If money is no object (relation; heh), then get your hands on both. Attachment theory is finally becoming widely recognized and applauded, even by the psychoanalytic community, which gave Bowlby (the original theorist) and his collaborators so much grief for decades. This field contains a hugely important body of work that provides not only new insights into human relationships across the life cycle (i.e., it no longer applies only to infants and their primary caregivers) but opens up whole new perspectives. For instance, I am quite interested in how greater awareness of "avoidant" and "ambivalent" attachment styles can deepen and ventilate -- the atmosphere having become deadly oppressive -- more traditional psychoanalytic views of narcissistic and so-called borderline personality disorders. Bowbly himself was convinced that avoidant attachment was related to the development of narcissism, and Fonagy drops further fascinating hints along these lines (though, as far as I know, the ambivalent/borderline connection is my own hypothetical surmise). A la Richard Nixon, let me just say this about that...
Attachment: don't leave your base without it. Otherwise, all your base belong to THEM!
also recommended (in part to explain my lame pun, above, but also because it's superb) is John Bowlby's book, A Secure Base, as well as his three seminal volumes on Attachment, Separation, and Loss. I'll add these various other works on attachment theory to the recommendations section on this page so you won't have to hunt them down via the aforementioned [koff-koff] search engine.
Christopher Locke, co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto, and author of Gonzo Marketing, and The Bombast Transcripts, none of which are related to the present topic... Hmmmm, or are they?

Rediscovered
Rediscovered
Offered by Vanderbilt CA
Price: CDN$ 22.89
9 used & new from CDN$ 8.85

5.0 out of 5 stars Get It While You Can!, Nov. 7 2003
This review is from: Rediscovered (Audio CD)
I notice that his first album is going here starting at $199. Man, I bought that one once in a cut-out bin for 99 cents! Anyway, the best song on it is Get It While You Can, which is also on this one. So do.

The New New Economy: Yet Another Clueless Manifesto for the Post-Digital Age
The New New Economy: Yet Another Clueless Manifesto for the Post-Digital Age
by Tim Mceachern
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 17.16
13 used & new from CDN$ 2.63

5.0 out of 5 stars The Secrets of Inner Loserhood and so much more..., April 30 2002
Yeah, it's true I blurbed it, but I liked this book anyway. I wasn't just saying that. Honest. Word. Trust me. When I opened the galleys, I was in a foul mood. Not amused in the least that I was going to have to say something that made it sound as if I'd actually read this thing. Then I started chuckling. Then I started belly laughing. Then I read the whole damn book. And I never read whole damn books. The New New Economy is impossible to describe except to say that these guys know precisely where the bodies are buried and aren't keeping any secrets. Smarter than you can believe and REALLY funny. Go ahead, click the little button...

The Wealth of Knowledge: Intellectual Capital and the Twenty-first Century Organization
The Wealth of Knowledge: Intellectual Capital and the Twenty-first Century Organization
by Thomas A. Stewart
Edition: Hardcover
23 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant ideas - and the man can write!, Jan. 7 2002
Tom Stewart is the world's foremost authority on intellectual capital, which is no small recommendation in itself. But here's an equally important consideration for anyone thinking about buying this book: he won't bore you to death! If you've read much in this general area, you know that such a fatal end often awaits the unwary reader. In sharp contrast, this guy knows how to tell a story, and The Wealth of Knowledge is packed with them -- hugely engaging anecdotes drawn both from his own broad journalistic experience and from spirited conversations with an amazing array of business leaders. None of which is to imply that the theoretical foundations are glossed over. Stewart clearly has a wealth of knowledge himself in these matters. He imparts what he's learned in a way that not only enlightens, but also makes you want to keep reading. Solid, grounded and profoundly useful insights. Highly entertaining. Highly recommended.

- Chris Locke, author of Gonzo Marketing: Winning Through Worst Practices, and co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto.

Fear And Loathing In America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist
Fear And Loathing In America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist
by Hunter S. Thompson
Edition: Hardcover
17 used & new from CDN$ 5.44

5.0 out of 5 stars Surfin' USA, Nov. 28 2000
History sure, yeah yeah. As if it's over. What can you say about a guy who ends a piece -- on ESPN.com no less, two weeks ago -- with this gratuitous aside: "And the whole Bush family, from Texas, should be boiled in poison oil." What can you say except keep it coming, Doc.
"...you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost *see* the high-water mark -- that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back." So wrote HST in Fear and Loathing, part the first.
Except that it never really broke. Never really rolled back. He said it never got weird enough for him. But it will. Believe it. And it's coming in like a king-hell tsunami. As we say out here in the wild and wooly world-wide west: Yee-hah!

Net Worth: Shaping Markets When Customers Make the Rules
Net Worth: Shaping Markets When Customers Make the Rules
by John Hagel
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 19.96
35 used & new from CDN$ 0.40

5.0 out of 5 stars On the Cluetrain, April 28 2000
Whatever you may think about the infomediary business model -- and I've got my own reservations -- the real value of this book lies in its approach to thinking about the challenges and opportunities of serious e-commerce. This isn't a simple formula for overnight success or (god help us) yet another instance of high-tech boosterism. Instead, it offers deep insight into the dynamics which businesses must grasp in order to survive and prosper in a networked economy. Following on Hagel's previous work, Net Gain, this book will richly repay the attentive reader. Even if your ultimate response is a critique of its axioms and assumptions, you'll come away smarter from having engaged in the exercise. Highly recommended.

All Tomorrows Parties
All Tomorrows Parties
by William Gibson
Edition: Hardcover
53 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars Consensual hallucination, Nov. 27 1999
This review is from: All Tomorrows Parties (Hardcover)
Typecast as herald of some questionable cyber salvation -- from the body, from "meatspace" (ugh!), from (who knows) getting a Real Job -- Gibson was initially catapulted up the charts for reasons that largely missed his genuine talent, which is *writing.* I knew this on encountering the first line of Neuromancer (from memory): "The sky over the port was the color of television tuned to a dead channel." Wow.
And his writing has gotten better, his inner ear more attentive to the (real) real world. Never mind what he's saying. Listen to how he says it. There is genuine poetry here. Gibson should be hailed not for mapping new concepts that presaged the Internet, but for extending something very much older: the language. *That* is the ultimate consensual hallucination. Long may it wave!

The Experience Economy: Work Is Theater & Every Business a Stage
The Experience Economy: Work Is Theater & Every Business a Stage
by B. Joseph Pine
Edition: Hardcover
50 used & new from CDN$ 0.02

5.0 out of 5 stars Business as Performance Art. Yes!, July 23 1999
As co-author of the cluetrain manifesto .......... I'm often asked by companies how they can implement the ideas we talk about. This book is a great place to start. Unfortunately, the listing here leaves out the subtitle: "Work Is Theatre & Every Business a Stage." That's what got to me. Acknowledging the role of serious play in serious commerce is long overdue, but The Experience Economy makes up for lost time. While most business books are little more than literary Sominex, this one will stretch your head in new dimensions. Even if you disagree with bits, it'll wake you, shake you, make you think.
At first, I was put off by the notion of the Internet as "the greatest force for commoditization known to man." This is only true when the net is seen as an extension of the broadcast model: think TV. But that's the wrong approach, as the authors later make clear: "Cyberspace is a great place for such experiences, but many businesses still don't get it. They're heading into the commoditization trap, trying to figure out how to better sell their company's goods and services over the World Wide Web, when in fact most individuals surf the Net for the experience itself."
E-commerce as performance art, I love it! So step right up, boys and girls, and get your ticket to the Pine & Gilmore Masque. The show's just about to begin!

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