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John Kwok (New York, NY USA)
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The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria
The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria
by Carlos Hernandez
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 16.69
10 used & new from CDN$ 16.69

5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, Brilliant and Compelling Tales from a Notable New Voice in Contemporary Anglo-American Speculative Fiction, March 23 2016
Carlos Hernandez's "The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria" is one of the most notable recently published debut short story collections I have read, worthy of comparison with the latest from the likes of Neil Gaiman, Kelly Link and China Miéville, among others. Much to his credit, Hernandez, who was trained primarily in mainstream literary fiction writing, has mastered brilliantly, the substance and style of contemporary Anglo-American speculative fiction, yielding such gems as his "Fantaisie Impromptu No.4 in C#min, Op. 66" which may be the finest tale I have read regarding classical music, futuristic neurotechnology and the afterlife. He pays ample attention to his own "assimilated Cuban" heritage in memorable stories like "More Than Pigs and Rosaries Can Give" and "Los Simpáticos" - which can be seen as a darkly humorous satire on reality television - and the title story itself, at the end of this remarkable collection, which delves deeply into the Afro-Cuban faith of Santeria, while giving a most unique perspective from a child's point-of-view of a family breakup with a most surprising twist. Hernandez tugs at the reader's emotions, offering sympathetic, often moving, portrayals of each of the characters in his stories. While "The Assimilated Cuban's Guide to Quantum Santeria" is a notable collection of contemporary Anglo-American speculative fiction at its best, replete with ample excursions into magical realism with a stop or two in hard science fiction, it should also be seen as an important literary statement for those who are interested primarily in contemporary fiction writing from Latino American authors.

A Crown for Cold Silver
A Crown for Cold Silver
by Alex Marshall
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 29.00
24 used & new from CDN$ 18.45

4.0 out of 5 stars Fine, Not Great, Sword and Sorcery Fantasy Novel Noteworthy for Its Mordant Humor, March 23 2016
Noted science fiction and fantasy editor Gardner Dozois observed recently that most newly published sword and sorcery fantasy novels tend to emulate the spaghetti western films by introducing readers to a desolate town inhabited by illiterate peasants. We readers are treated to gritty realism, in lieu of spectacular castles and exquisitely dressed nobles and sorcerers. Alex Marshall's "A Crown for Cold Silver" is the archetypical example that Dozois regards with ample skepticism, even if it introduces readers to a fantasy realm in which the sexes are equal, with women capable of leading vast armies into battle. However, there is still much to recommend in Marshall's debut fantasy novel - the name "Alex Marshall" is actually a nom de plume of a successful author who has written successfully in several genres - starting with the exceptional realism of characters, and ample dosage of mordant humor. Diehard fans of sword and sorcery fantasy may find far more admirable, debut fantasy novels from the likes of Ken Liu ("The Grace of Kings") and Seth Dickinson ("The Traitor Baru Cormorant"), which are especially noteworthy for their spectacular world-building, whether it is from East Asian history and mythology (Liu) or from slyly adopting some current socioeconomic political thought (Dickinson). In stark contrast, Marshall has borrowed from various East Asian and South Asian cultures, freely adapting them into the creation of the "Crimson Empire" fantasy saga that will continue in a subsequent sequel. In introducing readers to his "Crimson Empire" fantasy saga, Marshall may have created a fantasy realm that some discerning readers have recognized as a sword and sorcery fantasy riff on "Star Wars". Those willing to overlook these artistic flaws and enjoy its ample mordant humor, will find "A Crown for Silver" a memorable debut fantasy novel.

The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters
The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters
by Sean B. Carroll
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 22.99
34 used & new from CDN$ 19.70

5.0 out of 5 stars Quite Possibly The Most Important, Most Influential Popular Science Book on Biology for Our Time, March 15 2016
How do animals (and plants) regulate their numbers? Why does the human body possess a great degree of self-regulation, culminating with healing? Why should biology matter to you and me? Distinguished evolutionary developmental biologist Sean B. Carroll explains how and why the rules regulating ecosystems apply to the human body in his "The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works And Why It Matters". One of our foremost communicators of science, Carroll combines his vast scientific knowledge, superb storytelling talent and fine prose in demonstrating that there is indeed a "common underlying logic to life" as expressed by the similar rules regulating vast scales of biological organization, from the organ systems of the human body to immense ecosystems like East Africa's Serengeti. Organized into three sections, Carroll's latest book is a bold, provocative, and compelling exploration of the rules governing life on Earth, conveyed through his vivid, often insightful, accounts of those biologists who discovered them. In "Everything Is Regulated", he introduces to two pioneering figures of early 20th Century biology, Harvard University physiologist Walter Cannon, and Oxford University ecologist Charles Elton, describing how Cannon stumbled upon homeostasis and Elton made sense of the "economy of nature", recognizing the importance of regulating numbers of animals via the existence of food webs. In “The Logic of Life”, Carroll describes the importance of Jacques Monod’s and Francois Jacob’s discovery of enzyme regulation, and how it influenced a later generation of molecular biologists in the United States and Japan in understanding the origin of cancer and in developing suitable drugs for treating it. In “The Serengeti Rules” – the book’s longest section – Carroll describes how marine ecologist Robert T. Paine recognized the existence of keystone predators on top of the food chains of ecosystems, and how this led to the discovery of trophic cascades, in which the presence or absence of keystone predator and prey species have substantial impacts on regulating the structure and population densities of ecosystems. He concludes by showing how the ecological rules of regulating animal numbers – “The Serengeti Rules” - have been applied successfully in bringing back from the verge of extinction, the once lush Gorgongosa of Mozambique and in wiping out forever, the lethal scourge of mankind that was smallpox. In citing these and other examples, Carroll impresses upon us the need to employ “The Serengeti Rules” to preserve forever, Earth’s biodiversity, not merely for our sake, but for the sake of succeeding generations of humans. For these reasons “The Serengeti Rules” may be recognized as one of the most important popular science books published this year, and perhaps, one of the most influential of our time.

The Magicians Trilogy Boxed Set
The Magicians Trilogy Boxed Set
by Lev Grossman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 71.54
17 used & new from CDN$ 45.00

5.0 out of 5 stars The FIrst Great Fantasy Saga of the 21st Century, Feb. 26 2016
Lev Grossman has reinvigorated the genre of fantasy with his "Magician" novels, merging traditional tropes of heroic fantasy with the elements and techniques associated with contemporary mainstream Anglo-American literary fiction, and creating what have to be regarded as instant classics in the genre of fantasy fiction. "The Magicians" is the first great fantasy novel of this century; a riveting coming-of-age tale about an intellectually gifted teenager, one Quentin Coldwater, eventually, a magician who learns that possession of great magical powers can come at a most terrible price. Paying homage to such illustrious writers as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, T. H. White, and Ursula K. Le Guin, while also acknowledging a most respectful nod or two to J. K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" saga, Grossman has wrought a fantasy tale steeped in realism unlike any other, one in which reasonable, sound choices are those that can be expected and the usage of magic itself can not alter the past nor the present. An unexpected chain of events takes Coldwater from the streets of his Park Slope, Brooklyn home to the Brakebills College of Magical Pedagogy, whose idyllic grounds overlook the Hudson River, even as he dreams of Fillory, the magical realm depicted in his favorite fantasy novels. A passion that consumes him even as a young adult recently graduated from Brakebills, until, by accident, he learns that Fillory is indeed a real realm located in another plain of existence. Journeying with his college friends, Quentin makes a perilous trip there, finding it not the realm of his dreams, but instead, one that is far more dangerous than he could ever have possibly imagined, and uncovering a terrible secret whose discovery will cause great harm and emotional anguish to Quentin and his friends. Much to my astonishment, Grossman has written a most compelling dark fantasy novel for adults that merges the emotions, wants and desires of twenty-something adults within the tropes of heroic fantasy; it would be an understatement to say that this is a "Harry Potter" novel for adults; it is much more, an epic fantasy worthy of comparison with the finest written from the likes of Homer to Lewis and Tolkien, and one that considerably raises the standard for writing epic fantasy tales, by merging it successfully within the genre of mainstream literary fiction. Without a doubt, "The Magicians" will be remembered as one of the great fantasy novels of our time, and it and its sequels as the first great fantasy saga of the 21st Century and one worthy of recognition as among the finest ever conceived.

Magic is disappearing from Fillory, and the Neitherlands - the realm that is the "door" to Fillory from Earth - lies in ruins. To save Fillory, Quentin Coldwater, a Magician King of this realm, must embark upon a quest to save it and to save magic forever, searching for a set of golden keys that will rescue both from the dark fate awaiting them. An epic quest that will thrust him back to Earth, on a globe-trekking journey from his parents Chesterton, Massachusetts home to the canals of Venice, searching for a means to return to Fillory after being sent unexpectedly back to Earth. However, "The Magician King" is not just an epic fantasy novel about Quentin embarking on a hero's quest. It is also chronicles how Quentin's high school friend Julia became a magician in her own right, after flunking the Brakebills College entrance examination. "The Magician King" is as much her story as it is Quentin's. How she undertakes her own personal perilous journey to master magic, a dark form that she learns in a house inhabited by self-taught magicians in the urban jungle that is the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. A perilous journey that will also lead her to Venice, where she and her friends undertake a ritual to summon the old gods with disastrous consequences for all. Lev Grossman has written a darker, psychologically, intense sequel to "The Magicians", and one that literally overturns the notion that the hero earns his rewards at the very end. "The Magician King" demonstrates that Grossman has become the true heir to C. S. Lewis and his "Narnia" fantasy saga, but a heir who demonstrates confident mastery of both mainstream literary fiction and fantasy tropes, in crafting a sequel to "The Magicians" that may be a far more intense, emotionally and psychologically riveting tale than its predecessor. Without a doubt, Grossman demonstrates in "The Magician King" that he deserves ample recognition, along with Neil Gaiman, Ursula Le Guin, China Mieville and Catherynne Valente, among others, as one of the great fantasy writers of our time.

With the debut of "The Magicians", Lev Grossman introduced readers to a new form of heroic epic fantasy, one in which the rules of magic existed with ample realism; a heroic epic fantasy novel that had more in common with Philip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy than anything written by the likes of Neil Gaiman, George R. R. Martin, or J. K. Rowling, especially when Grossman's "Magician" novels have been dubbed "Harry Potter for adults". "The Magician's Land" is the most "adult" of the "Magician" novels, and yet, one which will dazzle readers with more feats of magic and heroic fantasy quests, than in the prior "Magician" novels. One of the greatest - I would say even guilty - pleasures in reading the work of a most gifted and thoughtful writer, Lev Grossman, has been watching the development of a great cast of memorable characters, of whom Quentin Coldwater, the main protagonist in the "Magician" novels, may be the most complicated hero ever envisioned within the genre of heroic epic fantasy. Indeed Quentin's ongoing struggles to understand his magical powers, and to deal with his personal crises, clearly has struck a nerve with many of Grossman's younger, often twenty-something, readers, making him a realistic figure far more sympathetic and intriguing than Bilbo Baggins, Frodo Baggins or the wizard Gandalf in J. R. R. Tolkien's "Middle-Earth" novels and tales.

While one doesn't have to read the other two novels in the "Magicians" trilogy to get ample pleasure reading the latest exploits of Quentin and his friends, readers who are familiar with the earlier novels will understand the great emotional arcs undertaken by them, showing great capacities for personal growth both here, in the real world, and in the magical realm of Fillory. We're introduced to Quentin as part of a team of magicians planning a most spectacular heist, before we are treated to an engrossing back story regarding his all too brief tenure as a new Brakebills Preparatory College of Magic professor, and his unexpected encounter with brilliant, and exceptionally talented, Brakebills student Plum; an encounter that will take them on an epic quest that will lead them to a most powerful spell, and eventually, even Fillory itself. A Fillory whose future seems dark, as its rulers, Eliot and Janet, old friends of Quentin's, try saving it. Grossman's superb gifts as both a fine prose stylist and engrossing storyteller are in ample abundance in "The Magician's Land", and, even more than its predecessors, yielded a novel so compellingly readable that I found it impossible to put down. It is no mere understatement to note that "The Magician's Land" is a spectacular conclusion to the best fantasy series published so far in this century, and one that will be remembered as one of the greatest fantasy sagas of all time.

The Orion Plan: A Thriller
The Orion Plan: A Thriller
Offered by Macmillan CA
Price: CDN$ 13.99

5.0 out of 5 stars An Exciting, Fast-Paced New Take On A Timeless Scientific Fictional Theme, Feb. 26 2016
"The War of the Worlds" meets "Mean Streets" (Martin Scorsese's second film) in Mark Alpert's clever, fast-paced science thriller "The Orion Plan", which may be the most original novel I have read in years regarding a possible alien invasion of Earth. Native Manhattanite Alpert takes readers on a whirlwind tour of above and below the streets of Manhattan when a mysterious alien object crashes into northernmost Manhattan's Inwood Hill Park. NASA scientist Sarah Pooley spots the object hurtling rapidly towards the Earth at the incredible speed of thirty-seven kilometers per second (83,000 miles per hour), and warns United States Air Force's Space Command, under the command of its brilliant, MIT-educated commander, General Brent Hanson. Soon she realizes that she must lead the effort to find the object and discover the true nature of its intentions, as it begins tapping into New York City's Con Edison electrical network. A homeless man, a dying African-American priest, and several Dominican-American teenaged gang members are among those who make "first contact' with the object, becoming unsuspected subjects as its influence over them increases. Much to his credit, Mark Alpert - a Scientific American contributing editor with a background in astrophysics - has admirably melded state-of-the-art science, and informed scientific extrapolation - though as a former evolutionary biologist, I have some doubts regarding the physical appearance of the aliens which launched the probe from their distant planet in a remote solar system far, far away - with his fine prose and storytelling into a fast-paced, compelling page-turner of a thriller. "The Orion Plan" will please any potential reader interested in a fresh take on one of the most important themes of science fiction - first contact with hostile aliens - as well as those who are long-time fans of Alpert's earlier science thrillers.

The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age
The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age
by Adam Segal
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 33.65
27 used & new from CDN$ 23.44

5.0 out of 5 stars A Notable Book on the Geopolitical Implications of Cyberwarfare, Feb. 23 2016
"The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver And Manipulate In The Digital Age" may become as important as Bruce Sterling's "The Hacker Crackdown" in chronicling the history of online hacking. It may be more important in the sense that this is the first major book I have seen that looks critically at the geopolitical implications of organized online hacking by intelligence agencies, military - and paramilitary - organizations and terrorists. In plain English, it explores the usage of online hacking as a means of waging war via nonlethal means, but ultimately, resulting in creating ample mayhem and mischief on a scale approaching traditional, quite lethal, warfare. It does not delve deeply into the creation of online digital weapons like the notorious Stuxnet virus, the subject of journalist Kim Zetter's exceptional "Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World's First Digital Weapon". Instead, it describes, in gripping detail, how Iran responded to the online threats posed by Stuxnet and similar viruses, by using reserve engineering of relevant software, and quickly becoming, in its own right, a major regional cyberpower, capable of crippling the online infrastructure of its Middle Eastern neighbors. While Segal shows that there's been reluctance between the United States and Russia to engage in substantial online cyberwarfare, he does note the increasing importance and interest expressed by the Chinese, as well as the rogue states he believes have become important cyberpowers in their own right; Iran and North Korea. Such reluctance, however, hasn't deterred the United States and Russia from including cyberweaponry as increasingly important aspects of their military arsenal, and Segal does discuss at great length, American efforts in deterring cyberattacks as well as furthering their importance in the cyberweaponry arms race. With regards to Russia, he shows how cyberwarfare played important roles in its 2008 invasion of part of the Republic of Georgia and in the ongoing conflict between Kremlin-backed rebels in Eastern Ukraine with Ukrainian military forces. He also cites important recent events that may be milestones in the history of cyberwarfare, like the Twitter war in Gaza between the Israeli Defense Force and the Hamas "government" of the Gaza Strip, seeking to win the hearts of minds of people across the globe via social media. On a far more sobering note, Segal concludes, by noting the decline of the "Digital Pax Americana" since the "Year Zero" (2012), pointing to the rise of cyberpowers like those cited earlier that seek to use cyberwarfare to further their military, economic and geopolitical objectives. "The Hacked World Order" may be the most important book on contemporary foreign relations published this year, and one worthy of an exceptionally broad audience, from politicians to those in the public vaguely aware of cyberwarfare.

1989
1989
Price: CDN$ 12.88
23 used & new from CDN$ 12.59

4.0 out of 5 stars A Musical Homage from One Singer-Songwriter to Another That Is Superior to the Original, Feb. 20 2016
This review is from: 1989 (Audio CD)
Ryan Adams channels Bruce Springsteen in his homage to Taylor Swift, covering all of the songs on her "1989" album, and making a very good case why her "1989" deserves some critical - as well as popular - acclaim. The Bruce Springsteen that Adams channels here is the Springsteen of "Nebraska", and most of these songs emphasize only Adams on guitar and his heartfelt, soft-spoken voice. I was especially impressed with his covers of "Wildest Dreams" and "Bad Blood", and both are far more preferable to the Taylor Swift-sung high gloss pop originals in their country musical arrangements. Another exceptional song is "Blank Space" - one of Swift's strongest songs on her album - in its acoustic, alt-country, arrangement. I am not entirely persuaded that Adams makes an exceptionally strong case for the entire "1989" album; indeed, I regard the album as a largely hit or miss affair, with a strong emphasis on miss, lacking the exceptional songwriting I have seen from the likes of Sara Bareilles, Tift Merritt, and even, a somewhat subdued Elton John on his lackluster "The Diving Board" album; instead, of listening to "1989", I regard Swift's most recent prior album, "Red", to be far more compelling with respect to her songwriting. Adams' cover of "1989" will definitely please both his fans and Swift's.

Lovecraft Country: A Novel
Lovecraft Country: A Novel
by Matt Ruff
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 29.21
34 used & new from CDN$ 15.88

5.0 out of 5 stars A Spellbinding Horror and Fantasy Tale That Delves into Race Relations in America, Feb. 19 2016
An exceptional homage to H. P. Lovecraft's fantasy and horror, a witty and profound fictional commentary on Jim Crow America from an African-American perspective, and a spellbinding pulp fiction noir thriller, "Lovecraft Country" is all that plus more. It may be Matt Ruff's most accessible novel to date, one worthy of relegating into obscurity, his well-deserved status as one of our most notable cult novelists of genre-bending fiction, having written such memorable works as his dungeons and dragons-inspired Ivy League (Cornell University, his alma mater) debut novel "Fool on the Hill", his Ayn Rand-inspired near future dystopian New York City post-cyberpunk speculative fiction novel "Sewer, Gas & Electric: The Public Works Trilogy" - which may still be the finest of its kind ever written - and his recent Philip K. Dick homages; "Bad Monkeys", and especially, "The Mirage", his exceptional 9/11 alternative history science fiction novel that not only equals - but may be better than - Dick's "The Man in the High Castle". "Lovecraft Country" is absolutely relentless in its characterization, plotting and attention to detail, grabbing the reader's immediate attention from the very first page, taking us along on what Neal Stephenson has said is a "...funny, fast, exciting and affecting read." Fans of William Gibson, David Mitchell, China Miéville and Neal Stephenson will find much to admire in Ruff's spellbinding tale, which should be seen as the American equivalent of Mitchell's "The Bone Clocks", especially in Ruff's frequent excursions into magic, fantasy and horror.

After returning to his childhood home in 1954 Chicago only to find his father inexplicably missing, Korean War veteran Atticus Turner drives to New England with his uncle George - the publisher of the Safe Negro Travel Guide - and his childhood friend Letitia, where they discover his father held prisoner by the enigmatic cabal, the Order of the Ancient Dawn, on the Ardham, Massachusetts estate of Samuel Braithwhite, whose family owned one of Atticus' ancestors. Not realizing that Atticus has been lured to the estate, he, his father, uncle George, and Letitia, soon find themselves a most unlikely ally, Samuel's son Caleb, and one they know is untrustworthy, eventually becoming his pawns in a power struggle pitting the younger Braithwhite against those leading other local chapters of the Order of the Ancient Dawn, culminating in a final confrontation replete with Lovecraftian magic and horror. Ruff takes us on a memorable supernatural journey through 1950s America, encountering unseen monsters in the dark and lake-dwelling tentacle creatures that eat their victims whole, melancholy ghosts, haunted houses, deadly magical spells and the mundane racist horrors of Jim Crow America both in the North as well as the South. His depiction of the Turners, their family and friends, is exceptional in its realistic depiction of African-Americans by a writer who can't claim to be a "magic Negro" - a phrase that does appear in the novel - and should endear him to anyone acquainted with African-American history, culture and fiction. With "Lovecraft Country", Ruff has written an important fictional meditation on the state of race relations in the United States that remains relevant today, and one that should be greatly admired by many, especially those encountering his superbly crafted prose and storytelling for the very first time.

This Census-Taker
This Census-Taker
by China Miéville
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 27.31
33 used & new from CDN$ 16.78

5.0 out of 5 stars Quite Possibly the Closest Miéville Has Come to Writing Contemporary Mainstream Literary Fiction, Feb. 18 2016
This review is from: This Census-Taker (Hardcover)
The closest China Miéville has come to what one might regard as contemporary mainstream literary fiction, "This Census-Taker" may be viewed as his most atypical work of fiction to date, a psychological thriller that can still be seen as yet another notable example of what he and Jeff VanderMeer have dubbed as "weird fiction". Though told from the point-of-view of the protagonist, a nine year-old boy, looking back years later, it should not be viewed as quintessential Young Adult fiction like "Railsea", his most recent novel, since the plot and its setting have an orientation and tone that seem far more adult in nature than Miéville's prior fiction aimed for children and Young Adult audiences. It's a compellingly readable tale that deals with the very nature of memory, when the protagonist witnesses a traumatic event involving his parents, which results in his mother's sudden disappearance. After making an unsuccessful effort to flee, the boy finds himself trapped in his father's hilltop home, witnessing his father's increasingly deranged behavior. Until he encounters an older man, this census-taker from the novella's title, who is determined to discover the truth behind the father's mentally unstable behavior, while also offering the boy an unexpected chance for freedom and sanctuary. "This Census-Taker" is an elegant demonstration of Miéville's formidable literary talents as a superb prose stylist and exceptional storyteller, demonstrating once more why he is one of the foremost writers writing in the English language, irrespective of genre. However, those unfamiliar with his notable body of work, should consider seriously, reading earlier work like "Perdido Street Station", "The City and The City" and "Embassytown", before reading this seemingly familiar, and yet, odd, work of mainstream literary fiction.

Memory Theater
Memory Theater
by Simon Critchley
Edition: Hardcover
Price: CDN$ 16.69
35 used & new from CDN$ 8.42

5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Debut Work of Fiction from One of Our Most Notable Anglo-American Philosophers, Feb. 18 2016
This review is from: Memory Theater (Hardcover)
"Memory Theater" is a compellingly readable blend of memoir, philosophical treatise and fiction that explores the very nature of memory, relying not only on philosophy and theater, but also the latest scientific thinking, cleverly cloaked within a funny tale sure to please diehard fans of Douglas Adams and Monty Python. Discerning readers will pick up on "Memory Theater" as a succinct homage to Samuel Beckett, with terse, well-crafted prose that will remind many of Haruki Murakami, David Mitchell and China Miéville. As a work of fiction, "Memory Theater" is one of the most original published last year, not least because of its adroit weaving of autobiographically-inspired mainstream literary fiction with the metaphysical speculative fiction of Murakami ("Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World", "1Q84") Mitchell ("The Bone Clocks", "Slade House") and Miéville ("The City and The City"). Critchley has a well-deserved reputation for being one of our foremost popularizers of philosophy, and his debut work of fiction exhibits his elegant erudition and superb wit, which has endeared him to many fans.

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