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S Svendsen "Uni" (Canada)
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Lehrter Station (John Russell World War II Spy Thriller #5): A John Russell WWII Thriller
Lehrter Station (John Russell World War II Spy Thriller #5): A John Russell WWII Thriller
by David Downing
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 11.51
38 used & new from CDN$ 4.88

4.0 out of 5 stars Chaotic and dangerous Berlin in the aftermath of WWII, May 2 2014
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This 5th of Downing’s ‘Station’ WWII crime/thriller/spy series, follows closely the events of the 4th book, Potsdam Station. The time period is June to December 1945. The allies have divided Berlin, Germany, Vienna and Austria into four areas of control. The western and eastern borders of Poland have been shifted, dislocating Germans and Poles. Jews find themselves unwanted and unwelcome in most countries; their exodus to Palestine, with the hope to found a Zionist state, has started. Black-market profiteers—many of them former Nazi operatives—are aided by unscrupulous members of the American and British ‘liberators.’ Berlin is a mass of ruins and rubble. Millions of people have nowhere to live, suffer from famine and little or no health care or emergency aid. Police protection is virtually non-existent and where it exists it operates to give advantage to the ‘liberating’ authorities. Rivalries between political factions abound.

John Russell and his long time girlfriend, Effi Koenen, have found refuge in London. John’s son Paul and Effi’s sister Zarah and her son Lothar are with them. Rosa, a displaced Jewish girl with no mother and a lost father, who had been taken care of by Effi, is also with them. Effi through the collaboration of the British, Russians and, reluctantly, the Americans, make way for her to have the major role in a new movie being filmed in Berlin. Russell finds himself indebted to the Russians for having helped him to escape from Berlin at the end of the war. So the course is soon laid out for him to once again become a double agent for the Russians and Americans. Thus he and Effi both return to Berlin.

I think Downing’s research provides this book with considerable credibility about the post-war environment in Berlin and on the European continent. I found it interesting from that angle alone; the espionage intrigues and underhanded dealings are almost incidental to the chaotic conditions and conflicts that permeate the lives of everyone, except for a few who know how to stake out their territory and play their cards to own advantage. This novel is less suspenseful than the previous four but it held my interest to the end. It does tie up some lose ends. I look forward to reading the sixth book (and perhaps the last John Russell novel) which is called Masaryk Station.

Amethyst
Amethyst
by Lauraine Snelling
Edition: Paperback
31 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

5.0 out of 5 stars A fitting conclusion to Dakotah Treasures, April 29 2014
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This review is from: Amethyst (Paperback)
As the author states in her Acknowledgements this fourth volume of Dakotah Treasures was not planned; it became a necessity when Opal Torvald, Ruby’s young sister, was left stranded in the continuity. There was also the unresolved situation involving Jacob Chandler and his son Joel, characters introduced in the third volume. But this book begins by presenting Amethyst Colleen O’Shaunasy toiling day and night on a farm in Pennsylvania, under the oppression of her slovenly liquored-up father. He sends Amethyst to Medora/Little Missouri, Dakotah Territory, to fetch his deceased son, Patrick’s boy Joel. After arriving to Medora Amethyst discovers that Joel was fathered by Jacob Chandler before her brother married her sister-in-law Melody. (Melody had delivered Joel to Chandler before she met her demise.) Joel is therefore not her nephew or her father’s grandson. Her trip seems to have been for naught. But she is quickly ‘adopted’ by the warm-hearted folks of Medora and makes the decision not to return to the drudgery of her father’s farm. This book manages to satisfactorily tie up all the lose ends from the previous books.

Snelling is a masterful author of historical novels set in America, many of which have connections to Norwegian immigrants and their descendants. Having that same ethnic background myself, I started reading Snelling’s books after my mother left them on her passing. I kept adding new books as they were published. Incredibly, this reading was my twenty-first Snelling book and I have four more waiting on the shelf. I have not always been happy with some of Snelling’s references to Norway, Norwegian names and language, and with some errors about settler’s lives, circumstances, wildlife, etc. but her books have been consistently entertaining. She includes a lot of credible detail and dialogue. Characters’ self-reflective subjective dialogue, included in italicized sentences and phrases, adds to readers becoming intimately involved in their lives. The fictional characters soon feel like friends and members with whom we share their hopes, joys, remorse, suffering and crisis-of-faith.

In this book we share in Opal’s crisis-of-faith and deep depression brought on by the consequences of a severe winter which brings starvation and death to livestock and her beloved horses. She questions not only her faith in the God of the Bible—Who according to Scripture shall provide—but also her reason for living. Snelling gives the reader a true-to-life insight into how self-dejection and hopelessness can completely alter an individual’s personality. Fortunately her faith is gradually restored and she finds new purpose in getting on with life in a loving supportive relationship.

The Lone Ranger Volume 5: Hard Country TP
The Lone Ranger Volume 5: Hard Country TP
by Ande Parks
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.12
31 used & new from CDN$ 11.03

5.0 out of 5 stars As good as can possibly be!, April 26 2014
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Writer Ande Parks excels in this graphic western novel featuring the Lone Ranger and Tonto. His plots are tight, the drama heart-wrenching and the scripting precise. “Hard Country” describes well these tales of hard men driven by greed and power and the women who survive by stealth. There is nothing fake about the mood and emotion evoked in these pages. The realistic art by Esteve Polls and Marcelo Pinto is exquisitely drawn and colored; I’ve never seen better. Six stars!!!

The Land of Honey
The Land of Honey
by Chinenye Obiajulu
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 15.12
16 used & new from CDN$ 12.34

4.0 out of 5 stars Immigrants' courage and determination to overcome obstacles, April 25 2014
This review is from: The Land of Honey (Paperback)
The author Obiajulu is an immigrant from Nigeria to Canada, having settled in the province of Alberta. This is her first book. Although the characters are fictitious the reader gets the sense that much of the book is semi-autographical. As the saying goes “write what you know” and Obiajulu does not stray off the path of what is familiar to her, reflecting on her own experiences and observances. A warning that some readers may be put off by the first hundred pages of the book which is peppered with incomprehensible Nigerian words, phrases, colloquialisms and Pidgin English. The back of the book helps out with a glossary, but I soon felt it was too much of a distraction to repeatedly refer to it and then return to the front of the book to again find my place. Same page footnotes would have been a better idea but even then I feel that the author would have improved the reader’s enjoyment by leaving out much of the verbatim vernacular.

This is a novel about a young couple, the woman Anuli and her husband Zimako. They are both educated professionals with good positions in stable companies. Nigeria’s standard of higher education, and rate of participation is the best in Africa. But Nigeria is a dysfunctional country plagued by administrative incompetence and corruption, murderous sectarian and criminal violence and crumbling and unreliable infrastructure. Half its population lives in abject poverty. Islamist extremists who oppose modern education are terrorizing northern parts of the country.

Not liking the way things are going Zimako applies for himself and Anuli to become immigrants to Canada. It takes four years to be accepted and another half year to arrive in Canada. Zimako has high expectations of a good life in his new land but Anuli is less confident. After their arrival their adjustment process takes a long time. Canadian employers are sceptical of their qualifications. Zimako’s pride prevents him from making do with any position that lowers his professional self-esteem. Anuli is a better risk-taker, and does not confine herself to her husband’s dictates; this goes against Nigerian traditions in which the man rules the roost. But despite Zimako’s disapproval Anuli stays her course which precipitates a crisis in their relationship. As they drift apart, liaisons with others and moral dilemmas enter the picture.

From the beginning the reader becomes intimately acquainted with the couples’ family and friends, Nigerian customs as well as local surroundings and conditions. There is much chitchat and banter. Upon arriving in Canada we follow the couple’s journey through the bureaucratic maze and regulatory obstacles. As they make friends we share in these new relationships. Readers—especially immigrants—will perhaps identify with the frustrations Zimako and Anuli encounter in the form of scepticism, alienation, racism and well-meaning but ignorant remarks and questioning. Their patience and tolerance are tested at every turn. The writer has captured the reality of how difficult it can be for new arrivals to get a foothold in a new country with climate and culture that are so different from the ones with which they are familiar.

Each chapter starts with a boxed-in “Dear Diary” fragment from Anuli. Actually, most of the novel is narrated by her, with occasional segment by an anonymous narrator (for instances in which Anuli is not present). Although the couple and their parents are church-going Christians and faith is elemental to their lifestyle this book is not likely to appear in Christian book stores due to some frank erotic portrayals which, however, would be inoffensive to most readers. Considering the hardships endured by Anuli and Zimako, the title chosen by the author, “The Land of Honey,” alludes to a degree of sarcasm: Canada did not measure up to its billing. It is usually true that castles in the sky will prove to be reflections of wishful thinking based on incomplete information. This novel is educational as well as entertaining. The last third of the book rewards the reader with suspenseful surprises, stirs personal empathy for the characters and provides hearty confirmation of the resilience of the human spirit.

Calling Out for You
Calling Out for You
by Karin Fossum
Edition: Paperback
20 used & new from CDN$ 0.71

5.0 out of 5 stars A psychological Nordic mystery, April 18 2014
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This review is from: Calling Out for You (Paperback)
Note: This book, ‘Calling Out for You’ was later published in the U.S. under the title ‘The Indian Bride.’ Its original Norwegian title ‘Elskede Poona’ translates as ‘Beloved Poona.’

Fossum is perhaps Norway’s second best mystery writer, Nesbø being the best. Her books have been translated into twenty-five languages. I prefer Fossum because of her mature Inspector Sejer who is a laid back, inconspicuous, emotionally sensitive and psychologically astute sleuth. He works hand-in-glove with his handsome, more impulsive young sidekick Skarre.

This is the fifth Sejer mystery, published in 2000, but it can be enjoyed without first reading its predecessors. The main character in this novel, Gunder Jomann, is a middle aged bachelor living in a village next to a mid-sized city in Norway. He is a simple introverted guy working as a salesman in an agriculture supply firm. He is meticulous in his habits and capable in his job. He has been close to his mother who recently passed away so now he has become lonely in the house they shared. He has never had the courage or seen the necessity to initiate a relationship with a woman but now he desires the companionship of a wife. From a magazine featuring people from the world’s many diverse cultures he gets enamoured by the picture of a woman from exotic India. Ideas start percolating and he fantasizes about going to India to fetch himself an alluring Indian bride. All the pieces fall into place and the first likely candidate, a server in a restaurant, takes a liking to him. He marries the lovely, warm and genial Poona Bai. Jomann returns home to Norway. Poona is to follow when she has put her affairs in order.

As Jomann is about to pick up Poona at the airport, his dear sister Marie becomes seriously injured in a car accident. Her husband is out of the country so Gunder has to go to the hospital to be at his comatose sister’s bedside. The great anticipation he has harboured is shattered. He is forced to assign the village’s taxi driver to go to pick up Poona. But that driver is unable to find her at the busy terminal. So Poona hires her own taxi to take her to Gunder’s village. But her reunion with her husband never happens because she is found brutally murdered in a field by a lake less than a kilometre from Gunder’s house. Inspector Sejer gets assigned to the case and together with Skarre they eventually zero in on a culprit. The reader gets to know the mindsets of the different suspects and residents of the village. In a small place everyone knows everyone else and fingers point in different directions. As with one or two other Fossum mysteries the door is left ajar just a little bit at the end about who the murderer was—a literary device called ‘a mystery to conclude a mystery.’ I loved the last few pages in which Gunder self-reflects about Poona and by way of a translated letter—which she had sent to her brother before leaving India—we discover her true feelings for her new husband and her hopes for their future in a far off land. A very nice touch!

King Javan's Year
King Javan's Year
by Katherine Kurtz
Edition: Hardcover
21 used & new from CDN$ 3.63

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellently crafted intense and suspensful, April 17 2014
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This review is from: King Javan's Year (Hardcover)
Katherine Kurtz is an author who never shies away from twisted plots that often provide readers with the opposite of what they want or expect. But that doesn’t mean that readers will abandon her. In a fantasy world akin to our world’s tenth century, with the addition of a race having supernatural and magical abilities, a tension of treachery broods like a clammy fog to the landscape. It seems that victory for the righteous can never long be savoured until treason and betrayal festers to precipitate a calamitous vengeance.

This is the second novel of ‘The Heirs of Saint Camber,’ the eleventh of the fifteen Deryni novels* to be published but, confusingly, the fifth if read in chronological order (which I recommend). In the first novel of this trilogy, ‘The Harrowing of Gwynedd,’ the oldest of the late King Cinhil’s young sons, Alroy, had been drugged and manipulated by his self-serving power hungry Regents to do their bidding. Their primary task was to suppress the members of the Deryni race and legislate the removal of their rights to land, liberty and the sustenance of life. Alroy dies, having been weak and sickly for some time. After Alroy reached his age of majority, his Regents had lost some of their ability to act freely. His twin, Prince Javan, sympathetic to the Deryni, had temporarily sequestered himself for three years in a monastery, preparing to emerge to become king at the passing of Alroy. Archbishop Hubert, who sponsored Javan to assume a priestly vocation, had assumed that the youngest, immature and more pliable prince, Rhys Michael, would become king since Javan had chosen a life of religious devotion. But Javan has a surprise for Hubert and his courtly allies, he is determined to become king. Javan also has his allies and his younger brother has no interest in kingship for himself. These events lay the foundation for this novel. It becomes a year of incessant games of brinkmanship between King Javan, his allies and the ‘good’ Deryni and Archbishop Hubert, his allies and the ‘bad’ Deryni—games that frequently end in tortures, murders and battles to win and keep power through treasonous and brutal means.

Kurtz is usually big on rituals and ceremony in her books but in this novel she does not go to extremes. The book has loads of drama and presents both adversarial sides vividly through dialogue and narrative. We get to know the characters intimately, how they think, reason and plot to win power and keep it. This is an excellently crafted intense and suspenseful installment of the tragically heroic Deryni saga.

*a sixteenth novel ‘The King’s Deryni’ is scheduled for publication December, 2014

Carpathian Castle
Carpathian Castle
by Jules Verne
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Unexpected episodes of the macabre, April 5 2014
A famous opera soprano, her fanatical Baron admirer, her lovestruck Count fiancé, a mad scientist inventor and a collection of simple village folk in Transylvania are all brought together by Jules Verne to spin a tale of the haunted Carpathian castle. The inclusion of unexpected episodes of the macabre in this work is credibly presented. Yes, there are important elements of science fiction in the story but those are only revealed at the end. Before then the reader becomes practically convinced that there are evidences of supernatural phenomena afoot. Reading Verne over a century after he penned his books is an indulgence in literary nostalgia. (This novel was first published in 1893.) They assume a naiveté that a twenty-first century reader gladly assumes in honour of the Grand Master of the sci-fi genre. The latter part of the book comes close to being a page-turner. This is an easy and enjoyable read.

Waiting for the Galactic Bus
Waiting for the Galactic Bus
by Parke Godwin
Edition: Hardcover
40 used & new from CDN$ 0.01

2.0 out of 5 stars Shallow characters indulging in the frivolous, April 3 2014
I tried to like this book from the beginning. The concepts were good, having great potential for satiric play between two mischievous “creator” beings, cosmically out-of-bounds, and their interventionary “evolved” humanity populated by stereotypically frivolous, shallow, fanatical or violent characters. But, as is true with so many science fiction novels, the character development is artificial and shallow; there is no one for readers to like, at least not for very long. Cynicism seems a more apt a tone to describe this work than satire. The criticism of Christianity is certainly farcically cynical. I could tolerate this book up until it was four fifths complete. My tolerance ended with Chapter 33. Seldom do I read a book that close to the end without finishing it but I could no longer put up with the author manipulating the characters to act like crazed robotic caricatures with no hint of humanistic values. Too much chaos, too much nonsense, no hope for redemption from the outrageously ridiculous. I will not be reading the sequel ‘The Snake Oil Wars.’

Waiting For the Barbarians
Waiting For the Barbarians
by J.M. Coetzee
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 13.86
29 used & new from CDN$ 3.19

5.0 out of 5 stars A visceral presentation of autocratic brutishness, March 24 2014
This was the first book by Coetzee that I have read. I was immediately impressed by his wonderful ability to immerse the reader in atmosphere of the story and the plight of its characters. We soon become acquainted with the Magistrate who narrates his story. He appears to be an unambitious, harmless official living from day to day enjoying the little privileges and pleasures of his position, but he nurtures an inner nobility of character. After the arrival of a high official of the Empire, he becomes caught in a vise of autocratic brutishness. Whereas he has formerly been a dispenser of benign justice to the people in a remote colonial outpost he becomes witness to the dispensing of inhuman treatment and torture. He attempts to assist and befriending those who have been victimized but this ultimately results in he becoming accused of traitorously collaborating with the enemy. He endures terrible suffering which the author presents with visceral exactitude.

Although the story takes place in an unnamed fictional colonial ‘Empire,’ peopled by the privileged invaders and by indigenous ‘barbarians,’ we can assume that Coetzee drew many of his concepts from historical and geographical South African, and South West African (Namibian), influences. The policy of Apartheid was at its pinnacle when the book was written. But, no matter where in the world fascist colonial dictatorships have ruled their modus operandi have relied on the use of oppressive force to control the masses; a counterfeit judicial system is empowered to enforce ‘the rule of law’ which is adapted to serve the autocratic hierarchy. Even so-called democracies have frequently been known to impose their will over others on the pretext of influencing outcomes to benefit the populace when the motive was overwhelmingly to assist their own interests.

Although the reader may not realize it, the author has written a very political novel. He directly or obliquely comments on the state of suppressive authority, racial prejudice, cultural ignorance and a despondent humanity. The book, written over twenty years before Coetzee received his deserved Nobel Prize in Literature, is expertly written and is still somberly thought-provoking and relevant over thirty years later.

The Chaplain
The Chaplain
by Paul Almond
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.40
2 used & new from CDN$ 14.40

5.0 out of 5 stars The Boer War from a Canadian chaplain's perspective, March 20 2014
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This review is from: The Chaplain (Paperback)
This, the fifth book in the Alford saga, rooted in Maritime and Quebec history, is surprisingly short of Canadian scenario and experiences. Instead the author elects to send the hero from book four (The Pilgrim), Rev John Alford, to the Boer War in South Africa. This is explained by the fact that the novel is based on an actual character who did volunteer to be a Chaplain for the Canadian troops in that conflict. This book can stand on its own, not needing continuity from the previous books. However, since it is almost exclusively concerned with armies, soldiers and combat on foreign shores, it may not appeal to readers who have admired this series for its Canadiana. In author Paul Almond’s defence, the book does concern itself with Canada’s first offshore wartime adventure, an event that deserves to be better known by Canadians.

As outlined in five pages of ‘Acknowledgements’ at the end of the book, Almond and his dozens of collaborators did exhaustive research to put this book together. Reading this disclosure gave me the feeling that this medium-sized book of historical fiction was a massive ‘cut and paste’ operation. But I was impressed by all the effort that went into pooling all the diverse information to create a piece of literature possessing remarkable cohesion. It did disappoint me that so little of the narrative pertained to Canadian circumstances. (I was also disappointed that Almond included a partisan political jab in his acknowledgements. There is more than one side to every issue and this was not the place to editorialize.)

The narrative flows smoothly with the right intensity. John/Jack Alford’s thoughts, feelings, reasoning and emotions are very well stated. His willingness to stand up for compassion and justice is admirable. His moral failure occurs in credibly circumstances—between two people starved for loving affection. The conflicts between Catholic and Protestant doctrines and practices are ably included. The Catholic Chaplain’s resolution to Jack’s confession of sins is sensibly prudent. Jack’s confrontation with his own conscience in the struggle to find a compromise between a Christ-like pacifistic ideal and ‘murderous’ armed hostility is aptly presented. I thought the book had a rather abrupt and foreshortened ending. Fifty more pages, concerned with Alford’s return to and arrival back in Canada would have added greatly to the readers’ pleasure. Sadly, some authors have a criterion to fill a quota of pages and once that is achieved they forget about readers’ expectation to be fulfilled by a satisfactory conclusion to the book they are reading. However, I found this book to be informative as well as entertaining.

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