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Celil Parker "Jerry Parker" (région de l'Abitibi, QC)

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Catholic Subject Headings
Catholic Subject Headings
by Oliver Leonard Kapsner
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Seemingly Outdated, This Work Nevertheless Still Can Provide Considerable Help for Those with an Interest in Religious Studies, Aug. 29 2015
Most readers might wonder why a professional librarianship working tool like this list of subject headings could be of any interest or use to them. Well, it can be such if one has any interest in religious studies, Roman Catholic or otherwise. Lists of subject headings (or, to more limited extent, of descriptors) are a map of the grid of studies in any area. These subject headings, among other uses, can provide possible phrases to use in doing computer searches, or, in isolating key words within the subject headings, to use as descriptors for similar searches.

The complete U.S. Library of Congress subject headings list is an attempt to do this kind of thing for all aspects and areas of human knowledge; on that scale, obviously, such a work is by necessity sketchier than a list of subject headings, references, etc. would be for a particular subject, which a specialised list, such as "Catholic Subject Headings", can map out in greater detail than any list can do that for all of knowledge and human endeavour. While it is true that any edition inexorably dates quickly for how libraries and abstracting services apply specific headings, which can change terminology and other factors over time, any edition at all of something like "Catholic Subject Headings" remains a valid outline of the subject and potentially a great help for anyone who needs the right vocabulary for searching a religious subject without prior knowledge of appropriate scholarly terminology, whether in subject bibliographies, specialised dictionaries and cyclopaedias, indexing and abstracting services (in print or digital form) and within book indices. The same applies to online searching of most kinds. It is a good investment to acquire some edition of "Catholic Subject Headings", at least if the cost does not exceed sixty dollars or so.

This particular list of subject headings is not limited to matters specifically Roman Catholic. It applies to Christianity and religion generally. "Catholic Subject Headings" can aid any religious scholar, sometimes greatly, to organise his use of terminology, to get an overview of aspects large and small, and to have a grasp of to what religious studies amount. The cross-references, as well as the subject headings themselves, are very helpful in breaking out of any logjam that may block one's path through such studies by indicating alternative and parallel modes to approach similar subject matter and its terminology by means of the grid that together they provide.

So, in sum, this "Catholic Subject Headings", in any of its editions, is a work admittedly of limited usefulness. However, it also is one that can solve problems of a nature with which even dictionaries and encyclopaedias help in ways that are not always pertinent to a researcher's needs for the particular approach and terminology that a subject thesaurus like this subject lists lays out with such clarity.

Zabriskie Point by Warner Home Video
Zabriskie Point by Warner Home Video
DVD ~ Michelangelo Antonioni
Offered by JnP Store Canada
Price: CDN$ 37.72

5.0 out of 5 stars A Young Couple of the 1960s/1970s in the U. S. of A. Act on the Rebellious Spirit of That Age and the Lad Loses His Life for It, April 11 2015
I lived through (and took part in) the student activism and "alternative culture" of the 1960s and the dawn of the 1970s as a student myself (at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, in the same urban centre where actor Mark Frechette carried out his activism during that decade, and at the all-too-explosively alive Kent State University). I remember how we despised the acrid and shallow materialism of the prevailing culture of the U. S. of A. and how we longed to see it all blow up in the faces of that nation''s besotted leaders and of the easily deluded citzenry that kept on (and continues) voting them into office. That has happened, at last, with the implosion of the U.S. economy in the first decade of the 21st Century. It is a pity that this collapse, that makes an arrogant nation seethe with poverty and frustration thus doomed soon to powerlessness, did not occur sooner. Such timing would have limited the toll of victims of American power and greed to between the time of the film, 1970, and that of an earlier financial and militarily agonised doom.

Daria, seething with resentment for Mark's needless death (although his carelessness certainly brought it upon him), fantasises that the very symbol of the bourgeois fatuity of American callousness and vulgarity, i.e., the garishly opulent corporate facility (and/or mansion) set high in the desert surface, with joltingly sudden violent force explodes to smithereens (with visions of explosions of urban artificialty of many additional sorts added to this). That creates a breathtaking vision of justice come to a besotted and unworthy American culture of excess and greed.

I like the natural touch of the two leading actors using their real first names for their roles. Mark and Daria are the only truly natural humans in the film, doing what comes naturally to them, too, even if by thoughtless whimsy (e.g., Mark's theft of the aeroplane) at times, as well as by following their feelings to moving expression of what they experience at every moment, leads them, unafraid, to such natural sexuality and joyous revelry in each other, amidst the artificial constructs throughout the film, from which they stand aloof, of crazed student ideological excess, ruthless law enforcement, business and corporate cupidity, and so forth. Some of this may be naïve, and doubtlessly is, but it is such a relief to find these two young adults in this film who do not fall into the "cookie-cutter" patterns of American popular and corporate culture.

Alas, Mark in the film dies for daring what he does, from an insistence on following his impulses (for better and for worse) in unfettered freedom, which his society quickly crushes brutally and without immediate sufficient cause (i.e., for him having "borrowed" without permission the aeroplane which he is returning). Mark Frechette himself, whose performance in the role is so edgily convincing (and who was the gay lover of American-Québécois writer, Robert Dôle, also a young hippie during those years, before Antonioni filmed "Zabriskie Point", Dôle having departed by then to live in Québec) was a true counter-cultural rebel who lived out his convictions (none too wisely, but very intensely) and who died all too young for living out what he believed. As someone who was as radical and impulsive as the character Mark in the film, Mark Frechette, the handsome young actor whose career and very life ended so prematurely, was a real-life parallel (apart from the matter of Frechette's gay sexuality) in important aspects to what and whom he portrayed in this movie in which he appeared.

This is a wonderful film, redolent (of course!) of its era, but surprisingly relevant for the decades to follow and for present times of so much accumulated bitterness and of justice that too long has been delayed. A mere account of the film's action simply cannot convey the richness and untrammeled irony of what Antonioni accomplished thereby in this masterpiece of cinema.

I wish that the DVD edition that I acquired (or any other one) had included supplementary material and an appreciation of what Antonioni accomplished (but only if it were well done and worthy of him) but I also am simply pleased that this DVD is available at all, being a film, as it is, which does not flinch from judging the crassest kind of modernity that Southern California, Arizona, and the U. S. of A. as a whole, embody and have to represent to the entire world.

Zabriskie Point
Zabriskie Point
DVD ~ Mark Frechette
Offered by DVDCineShop CANADA
Price: CDN$ 18.51
2 used & new from CDN$ 18.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Consigning the Rotten, Decadent, and Greedily Corrupt Old Order of America to the Flames, April 11 2015
This review is from: Zabriskie Point (DVD)
I lived through (and took part in) the student activism and "alternative culture" of the 1960s and the dawn of the 1970s as a student myself (at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, in the same urban centre where actor Mark Frechette carried out his activism during that decade, and at the all-too-explosively alive Kent State University). I remember how we despised the acrid and shallow materialism of the prevailing culture of the U. S. of A. and how we longed to see it all blow up in the faces of that nation''s besotted leaders and of the easily deluded citzenry that kept on (and continues) voting them into office. That has happened, at last, with the implosion of the U.S. economy in the first decade of the 21st Century. It is a pity that this collapse, that makes an arrogant nation seethe with poverty and frustration thus doomed soon to powerlessness, did not occur sooner. Such timing would have limited the toll of victims of American power and greed to between the time of the film, 1970, and that of an earlier financial and militarily agonised doom.

Daria, seething with resentment for Mark's needless death (although his carelessness certainly brought it upon him), fantasises that the very symbol of the bourgeois fatuity of American callousness and vulgarity, i.e., the garishly opulent corporate facility (and/or mansion) set high in the desert surface, with joltingly sudden violent force explodes to smithereens (with visions of explosions of urban artificialty of many additional sorts added to this). That creates a breathtaking vision of justice come to a besotted and unworthy American culture of excess and greed.

I like the natural touch of the two leading actors using their real first names for their roles. Mark and Daria are the only truly natural humans in the film, doing what comes naturally to them, too, even if by thoughtless whimsy (e.g., Mark's theft of the aeroplane) at times, as well as by following their feelings to moving expression of what they experience at every moment, leads them, unafraid, to such natural sexuality and joyous revelry in each other, amidst the artificial constructs throughout the film, from which they stand aloof, of crazed student ideological excess, ruthless law enforcement, business and corporate cupidity, and so forth. Some of this may be naïve, and doubtlessly is, but it is such a relief to find these two young adults in this film who do not fall into the "cookie-cutter" patterns of American popular and corporate culture.

Alas, Mark in the film dies for daring what he does, from an insistence on following his impulses (for better and for worse) in unfettered freedom, which his society quickly crushes brutally and without immediate sufficient cause (i.e., for him having "borrowed" without permission the aeroplane which he is returning). Mark Frechette himself, whose performance in the role is so edgily convincing (and who was the gay lover of American-Québécois writer, Robert Dôle, also a young hippie during those years, before Antonioni filmed "Zabriskie Point", Dôle having departed by then to live in Québec) was a true counter-cultural rebel who lived out his convictions (none too wisely, but very intensely) and who died all too young for living out what he believed. As someone who was as radical and impulsive as the character Mark in the film, Mark Frechette, the handsome young actor whose career and very life ended so prematurely, was a real-life parallel (apart from the matter of Frechette's gay sexuality) in important aspects to what and whom he portrayed in this movie in which he appeared.

This is a wonderful film, redolent (of course!) of its era, but surprisingly relevant for the decades to follow and for present times of so much accumulated bitterness and of justice that too long has been delayed. A mere account of the film's action simply cannot convey the richness and untrammeled irony of what Antonioni accomplished thereby in this masterpiece of cinema.

I wish that the DVD edition that I acquired (or any other one) had included supplementary material and an appreciation of what Antonioni accomplished (but only if it were well done and worthy of him) but I also am simply pleased that this DVD is available at all, being a film, as it is, which does not flinch from judging the crassest kind of modernity that Southern California, Arizona, and the U. S. of A. as a whole, embody and have to represent to the entire world.

Zabriskie Point (Sous-titres français) [Import]
Zabriskie Point (Sous-titres français) [Import]
DVD ~ Mark Frechette
Price: CDN$ 26.55
18 used & new from CDN$ 7.92

5.0 out of 5 stars Two Kids of the 1960s/1970s Youth Culture Who Not Only Expouse but Also Live by the Ideals of the Time and of Their Generation, April 11 2015
I lived through (and took part in) the student activism and "alternative culture" of the 1960s and the dawn of the 1970s as a student myself (at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, in the same urban centre where actor Mark Frechette carried out his activism during that decade, and at the all-too-explosively alive Kent State University). I remember how we despised the acrid and shallow materialism of the prevailing culture of the U. S. of A. and how we longed to see it all blow up in the faces of that nation''s besotted leaders and of the easily deluded citzenry that kept on (and continues) voting them into office. That has happened, at last, with the implosion of the U.S. economy in the first decade of the 21st Century. It is a pity that this collapse, that makes an arrogant nation seethe with poverty and frustration thus doomed soon to powerlessness, did not occur sooner. Such timing would have limited the toll of victims of American power and greed to between the time of the film, 1970, and that of an earlier financial and militarily agonised doom.

Daria, seething with resentment for Mark's needless death (although his carelessness certainly brought it upon him), fantasises that the very symbol of the bourgeois fatuity of American callousness and vulgarity, i.e., the garishly opulent corporate facility (and/or mansion) set high in the desert surface, with joltingly sudden violent force explodes to smithereens (with visions of explosions of urban artificialty of many additional sorts added to this). That creates a breathtaking vision of justice come to a besotted and unworthy American culture of excess and greed.

I like the natural touch of the two leading actors using their real first names for their roles. Mark and Daria are the only truly natural humans in the film, doing what comes naturally to them, too, even if by thoughtless whimsy (e.g., Mark's theft of the aeroplane) at times, as well as by following their feelings to moving expression of what they experience at every moment, leads them, unafraid, to such natural sexuality and joyous revelry in each other, amidst the artificial constructs throughout the film, from which they stand aloof, of crazed student ideological excess, ruthless law enforcement, business and corporate cupidity, and so forth. Some of this may be naïve, and doubtlessly is, but it is such a relief to find these two young adults in this film who do not fall into the "cookie-cutter" patterns of American popular and corporate culture.

Alas, Mark in the film dies for daring what he does, from an insistence on following his impulses (for better and for worse) in unfettered freedom, which his society quickly crushes brutally and without immediate sufficient cause (i.e., for him having "borrowed" without permission the aeroplane which he is returning). Mark Frechette himself, whose performance in the role is so edgily convincing (and who was the gay lover of American-Québécois writer, Robert Dôle, also a young hippie during those years, before Antonioni filmed "Zabriskie Point", Dôle having departed by then to live in Québec) was a true counter-cultural rebel who lived out his convictions (none too wisely, but very intensely) and who died all too young for living out what he believed. As someone who was as radical and impulsive as the character Mark in the film, Mark Frechette, the handsome young actor whose career and very life ended so prematurely, was a real-life parallel (apart from the matter of Frechette's gay sexuality) in important aspects to what and whom he portrayed in this movie in which he appeared.

This is a wonderful film, redolent (of course!) of its era, but surprisingly relevant for the decades to follow and for present times of so much accumulated bitterness and of justice that too long has been delayed. A mere account of the film's action simply cannot convey the richness and untrammeled irony of what Antonioni accomplished thereby in this masterpiece of cinema.

I wish that the DVD edition that I acquired (or any other one) had included supplementary material and an appreciation of what Antonioni accomplished (but only if it were well done and worthy of him) but I also am simply pleased that this DVD is available at all, being a film, as it is, which does not flinch from judging the crassest kind of modernity that Southern California, Arizona, and the U. S. of A. as a whole, embody and have to represent to the entire world.

Brahms: Symphonies - 3 CD Set for the price of 2
Brahms: Symphonies - 3 CD Set for the price of 2
Price: CDN$ 41.42
6 used & new from CDN$ 33.79

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ah-h-h, Brahms' Own Arrangement for Orchestra of His "Liebeslieder" Waltzes -- Oh, Yes, Also His Symphonies and Much Else, Aug. 26 2014
I have longed, for many years, to find a CD of Johannes Brahms' own orchestral arrangement for orchestra of excerpts (to perform with or, better, without voices) from his two sets of the "Liebeslieder" waltzes. Here is one, at last! For most buyers, the presence of these waltzes as "fillers" on a complete set of the composer's symphonies would be a mere detail. For me, those waltzes are the very reason to obtain this set of the symphonies and various other music for, or arranged for, orchestra.

These dances work somewhat better as Brahms arranged them instrumentally for piano duo, but they delight best of all as recast for orchestra (without the option of having voices to sing along). Decades ago, Boyd Neel made an LP disc that included these waltzes. I kept it for many years, indeed, still have it somewhere lost in my basement.

Never have I heard any vocal recording of these waltzes that really satisfies me, although, strangely enough, some choral performances of these dances tend to fare better than renditions by solo classical vocalists do so. The singing, on any of the recordings, just is too heavy-going, with viscous textures resulting which are unsuited to these fluffy and utterly beguiling dance melodies. The almost disconcertingly light and airy textures of the orchestration which Brahms himself provided as this particular option for instrumental performance would seem to point to the advisability of rendering these waltzes with something less than rotundly galumphing overemphasis. If they are to be sung, what really is required is fine voices of quite another kind than of the usual operatic heavy artillery, but rather of impeccable musicianship, yes, but of non-classical timbre and of less density as well. How about, for a celestial "would-be" recording, on featuring genuinely idiomatic operetta vocalists, as one alternative. Another would be with performers from the folk-revival or popular (even county-western) idioms. Such (trans-generational) vocal pop luminaries as Judy Collins, Joni Mitchell, or Joan Baez, to take the upper female part, and like Roy Orbison, Ricky Skaggs, or Chris Isaac as tenor, could participate, and so it would go up and down the vocal registers of the vocal quartet's four voices, entailing vocalists who could sing the music just as Brahms himself composed it, but without the glutinous and cloying texture of the classically-formed voices which one hears in previous recordings of the work. Whether together they would attempt to sing in German or would resort to singing in English translation would leave me relatively indifferent. Such a line-up of vocalists together at one time, of course, only is going to happen "up there" in the Heavenly Realms, with Brahms himself looking on, listening with an appreciative smile.

Short of that, give me the composer's orchestral arrangements of some of those waltzes! Well, Riccardo Chailly now, and no longer perhaps only Boyd Neel so long ago, have done that. Goody! As for Brahms' four symphonies, I'll keep on listening to van Beinum's, Walter's, and Jochum's recordings conducting them, but this set will remain there on my shelves and in my CD player for the sake primarily (but not only) of these lovely waltzes!

Riccardo Chailly, too, is among the conductors whose work these days I savour, so I'll give a listen now and then, as well, to the rest of his Brahms orchestral CD set (even if Chailly's tempi and approach in some of Brahms' works on the set seem unnervingly peculiar in places), all the more since it is the Gewandhaus orchestra which Chailly conducts, the reputation of which had become more illustrious than ever in the early LP era under the direction of the great Franz Konwitschny, of blessèd memory. That ensemble remains one of the world's finest orchestras anywhere. Chailly is one of the few conductors nowadays worthy to lead such an exceptionally fine aggregate of musicians.

Brahms: Complete Symphonies (3 CD)
Brahms: Complete Symphonies (3 CD)
Price: CDN$ 39.99
26 used & new from CDN$ 26.38

4.0 out of 5 stars Ah-h-h! Those Infectiously Charming Waltzes, at Last, among the "Extras" of This Set of Brahms' Symphonies, Aug. 24 2014
I have longed, for many years, to find a CD of Johannes Brahms' own orchestral arrangement for orchestra of excerpts from his two sets of the "Liebeslieder" waltzes. Here is one, at last! For most buyers, the presence of these waltzes as "fillers" on a complete set of the composer's symphonies would be a mere detail. For me, those waltzes are the very reason to obtain this set of the symphonies and various other music for, or arranged for, orchestra.

These dances work somewhat better as Brahms arranged them instrumentally for piano duo, but they delight best of all as recast for orchestra. Decades ago, Boyd Neel made an LP disc that included these waltzes. I kept it for many years, indeed, still have it somewhere lost in my basement.

Never have I heard any vocal recording of these waltzes that really satisfies me, although, strangely enough, some choral performances of these dances tend to fare better than renditions by solo classical vocalists do so. The singing, on any of the recordings, just is too heavy-going, with viscous textures resulting which are unsuited to these fluffy and utterly beguiling dance melodies. If they are to be sung, what really is required is fine voices of another kind, of impeccable musicianship but of non-classical timbre and of less density. How about, for a celestial "would-be" recording, on featuring genuinely idiomatic operetta vocalists, as one alternative. Another would be with performers from the folk-revival or popular (even county-western) idioms. Such (trans-generational) vocal pop luminaries as Judy Collins, Joni Mitchell, or Joan Baez, to take the upper female part, and like Roy Orbison, Ricky Skaggs, or Chris Isaac as tenor, could participate, and so it would go up and down the vocal registers of the vocal quartet's four voices, entailing vocalists who could sing the music just as Brahms himself composed it, but without the glutinous and cloying texture of the classically-formed voices which one hears in previous recordings of the work. Whether together they would attempt to sing in German or would resort to singing in English translation would leave me relatively indifferent. Such a line-up of vocalists together at one time, of course, only is going to happen "up there" in the Heavenly Realms, with Brahms himself looking on, listening with an appreciative smile.

Short of that, give me the composer's orchestral arrangements of some of those waltzes! Well, Riccardo Chailly now, and no longer perhaps only Boyd Neel so long ago, have done that. Goody! As for Brahms' four symphonies, which numerous reviews on Amazon's WWW U.S. and other national sites cover so well that I shall pass over reviewing Chailly's performances of them, frankly, they were not a significant motivation that entered into my decision to purchase this set of CDs, so I'll just leave that matter at saying that I shall keep on listening to van Beinum's, Walter's, and Jochum's recordings conducting those four works, but that Chailly's set will remain there on my shelves and in my CD player for the sake primarily (but not only) of these lovely waltzes!

Riccardo Chailly, too, is among the conductors whose work these days I savour, so I'll give a listen now and then, as well, to the rest of his Brahms orchestral CD set, all the more since it is the Gewandhaus orchestra which Chailly conducts, the reputation of which had become more illustrious than ever in the early LP era under the direction of the great Franz Konwitschny, of blessèd memory. That ensemble remains one of the world's finest orchestras anywhere. Chailly is one of the few conductors nowadays worthy to lead such an exceptionally fine aggregate of musicians.

Elgar Violin Concerto - Serenade for Strings
Elgar Violin Concerto - Serenade for Strings
Price: CDN$ 28.07
13 used & new from CDN$ 16.97

5.0 out of 5 stars James Ehnes, One of the Violin Greats of These Times, Has Made Two Recordings of the Elgar Violin Concerto!, July 22 2014
James Ehnes, a distinguished Manitoban and one of the great violinists of these times internationally as well as in his homeland, the Dominion of Canada, has wide musical affinities, including much music from the Romantic era. Thus it may be less than surprising that there are TWO recordings of Ehnes playing Elgar's great violin concerto. One is the CD of Amazon's entry, which Sir Andrew Davis (well known for his devotion to Elgar's music) conducts. There is a considerably less well-known recording recently made available of the work in which Ehnes' playing is paired with the British Broadcasting Corporation's B.B.C. National Orchestra of Wales (B.B.C. Music BBCM-372-DDD), which couples the concerto with another of Elgar's works, in this case "The Spirit of England".

Those who have a subscription to the excellent music periodical, "B.B.C. Music Magazine" (or who buy it on the newsstand) and who have retained vol. 22, no. 10 (for July 2014), or at least the free CD that it has come with, will have this recording already. If they do, reluctance to obtain the Onyx recording also would be understandable. On the other hand, someone who has neither recording can search for the July 2014 issue of "B.B.C. Music Magazine" in a library and there play the CD of the Ehnes/Atherton recording to judge for himself whether s/he wishes at all to obtain a recording with Ehnes as the soloist in this particular work.

Folks do not need to know what the writer of these comments thinks of either or both of James' Ehnes' performances of Elgar's Concerto for Violin. Many would think that such an admiration for James Ehnes is too nearly unconditional to make any such comments likely to provide reliable guidance for themselves. These ears never have heard a performance from James Ehnes playing ANYTHING in which, all a-quiver and a-tingle, they have done anything other than to revel in the sheer musical bliss of it all. Just as having multiple recordings by Nathan Milstein of the same works which he played and recorded multiply over his long and glorious career (but, alas, Elgar's works not among them) always were, and ever will remain, welcome, so, today, when it comes to James Ehnes, albeit he is not quite of Milstein's legendary stature, nonetheless, so far as this listener is concerned, having ALL of Ehnes' performances is one mighty fine ideal to strive for.

Happy listening to either (or both) of Ehnes' recordings of Elgar's Violin Concerto!

Fred: The Movie
Fred: The Movie
Price: CDN$ 10.93
10 used & new from CDN$ 3.39

4.0 out of 5 stars Weird and Frantic All at Once: Are You Ready for Freddie the Wailing, Flailing Freak-Out?, April 2 2014
This review is from: Fred: The Movie (DVD)
Lucas Cruickshank, the eponymous protagonist of "Fred, the Movie" as a teenager is a boy of irresistibly epicene beauty. It is not often, however, in this madcap movie, that there is much of any real opportunity to appreciate suchlike of his pleasing physical assets, except for the rarest moments of smiling calm. That is because the character Fred is in a state of hyper-active, utter mania almost all of the time, grimacing, bounding about, and screeching seemingly uncontrollably. I can understand how many viewers who have commented on this film detest the entire thing as rubbish. However, if one takes the film on its own farcical terms, it is quite endearing. Lucas Cruikshank, if his voice is anything in reality as it is in the movie in which he plays this crazed fifteen-years-old junior high school boy, has yet, so far as his voice is concerned, to complete puberty, though he looks decidedly adolescent enough. More likely, the youthful actor's voice has undergone sonic manipulation. The kid certainly knows how to do frolic acrobatically, leaping and dancing to unbelievably energetic effect!

I watched this oddity in a state of attempted disbelief, having to turn down the volume when Fred/Lucas' screeching became too ear-splitting. Elsewhere there are accounts of the zanily exaggerated antics through which the movie's plot (such as it is) puts Fred, so I won't bother here to do the same. It is not a film that I would want to view often, maybe once or twice more during the length of life left to me. Despite that, this movie has a maniacally energetic, hysterical charm all of its own. Anyway, there are few motion pictures of its kind, beyond those of the likes starring, variously, Abbott and Costello, Jerry Lewis, and the Keystone Cops, or maybe occasionally early Eddie Cantor or Marx Brothers, in the company of some of whom, however, it probably is improper to place Cruikshank; maybe he is no more than a screaming human equivalent of the advertising world's animated "Energizer Bunny". I suspect that "Fred, the Movie" will endure as a "party film" and a delightful kiddies' treat, or simply in a niche for the cinematically bizarre.

Pianese Nunzio - 14 Anni A Maggio
Pianese Nunzio - 14 Anni A Maggio
DVD ~ Fabrizio Bentivoglio
Offered by Vecosell
Price: CDN$ 11.82
2 used & new from CDN$ 11.82

4.0 out of 5 stars An Handsome Teenage Boy's Singing and Good Looks Alike Provoke Love and Ensuing Trouble for a Crime-Fighting Italian Priest, Feb. 1 2014
I first saw this film, "Nunzio Pianese, 14 anni a maggio" (to put the eponymous boy's first and last names back into normal sequence within the title, which reverses them, as the officialdom portrayed prefers), marketed in English as titled "Sacred Silence", when it came out or close to that, at an international gay film festival ("Images + Nations") which takes place yearly in Montréal. The memory of this film, so broodingly intimate and mysteriously full of tension between the homey and spacious interior of the presbytery (priest's residence) and the forebodingly looming worlds, outside, of crime, of corrupted law and politics, of sacred and secular singing, and of the Italian pop music industry, is very striking. It is very gratifying to be able to see the film as frequently as I desire by means of the particular DVD edition (Picture This! Home Video PTHV-5091, bearing the ISBN 1-893410-22-6, in Italian with English subtitles) which I chose to obtain. Having visited Naples twice in the early 1960s, while in the U.S. Navy, it also is for me a pleasure, as it will be for other viewers, to see in this movie so many images of the city's rather seedy but colourful, crowded, and lively street life.

There is constant suspense about what finally begins to transpire by the long-anticipated ending of the film, when disaster is about to befall the brave priest (compromisingly tainted by his ephebophile sexual proclivity) and the boy, Nunzio Pianese, whose whole situation will change as the film progresses. During all this, Nunzio has been attaining pop music star status as a skilled celebrity "boy singer" (going by the show-business name of "Nino Pinis"), his pleasing adolescent beauty enhancing his public appeal, much as it has provoked the priest's illicit love for him.

The boy, who, essentially, is developing heterosexually despite his abnormal situation, accedes to the priest's sexual desires from respect and friendship for the adult man rather than from youthful passion or from any incipient homosexual or bisexual orientation on young Nunzio's own part. The city's corrupt criminal forces, and the local government authorities who facilitate in their undertakings, ensnare the priest, having learned of his scandalous sexual activites, in order to end the cleric's reforming efforts against their joint municipal turpitude, and also entrap the boy, whom they manoeuvre into betraying the priest who loves him and who has taken such an interest in furthering his musical attainments.

The film ends as the forces against the priest are closing in on him unawares. While some have found the slow development of the motion picture's action tiresome, my perception is that this gradual working out of the plight of the priest and of Nunzio, and of the depiction of the violence and corruption that surrounds them, make the hovering menace of the film's conclusion all the more effective.

The Nicolas Cage Collection (Bilingual)
The Nicolas Cage Collection (Bilingual)
DVD ~ Nicolas Cage
Offered by Now Showing DVD's
Price: CDN$ 18.01
12 used & new from CDN$ 18.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Why This Choice from among Cage's Films?, Jan. 13 2014
I like some of Nicolas Cage's work. That is because he can be quite a fine comedian. For the heavier roles, though, especially those in "action films" which entirely comprise the kind on this collection, Cage has many rivals among actors who fare better with such parts. Admittedly, I am not a big fan of action films except for certain, undeniably good ones (starring the likes of Al Pacino, for example, or even Colin Farrell). As for including on this DVD the potboiler, "World Trade Center", even when that film was made, it seemed to be merely, obviously and odiously, a 9-11 propaganda piece; many people even at the point at which that motion picture was made already were aware of more likely accounts of what really happened at, and to, those Twin Towers.

The three films that I would have selected would be "Raising Arizona", a very endearing comedy, indeed, as well as "Valley Girl" and "Trapped in Paradise". They are from early, or relatively so, in Cage's career, when he was both inclined to do comedy and was, quite convincingly, a ruggedly macho young lover; Cage should have remained on the path of hilarity! For a DVD collection of Cage's films, however, which does exist, there is a good compilation, also titled "Nicolas Gage Collection", which appears on a 4-disc DVD set on the M.G.M. label and an alternative from M.G.M. gets three of those four films, excluding "Valley Girl", onto a single DVD. That 4-discs includes, mostly, some cherishable comic films starring Cage, namely, besides "Valley Girl" (already mentioned), also "Honeymoon in Vegas", "Leaving Las Vegas", and "Moonstruck". Many others, though, won't agree with me and truly will savour, above all, Nicholas Cage's action films, more than I ever would do so. The set under review is the one for them.

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