Profile for T. Erickson > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by T. Erickson
Top Reviewer Ranking: 569,013
Helpful Votes: 1

Guidelines: Learn more about the ins and outs of Amazon Communities.

Reviews Written by
T. Erickson (Bethesda MD)
(REAL NAME)   

Page: 1
pixel
Back To Sanity: Healing the Madness of Our Minds
Back To Sanity: Healing the Madness of Our Minds
by Steve Taylor
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 12.24
27 used & new from CDN$ 9.70

5.0 out of 5 stars "Humania" diagnosed, Dec 12 2014
In this thoughtful, eloquent book Steve Taylor puts his finger right on the pulse of our chaotic species. He diagnoses us with the disease of "humania," a great neologism. The trouble with us, as he sees it, it we live our lives in an uncontrolled rush which can be blindly destructive. The reality of our "mental chatter" is at odds with our ideas of ourselves as rational, sensible people, and collectively we have not only brought horror and atrocity on each other, but we are wrecking the very life systems on which the planet depends.

I can also see where the trail runs between Taylor's earlier book, The Fall and Back to Sanity. In the Fall, he searched for, and probably found, a significant moment in which our species began to act, live and think as if it were somehow separate from the rest of nature. The current book picks up this path, and looks ahead, to how we might possibly learn from our mistakes, correct our worst impulses, and find our way back to sanity.

Daniel O'thunder
Daniel O'thunder
by Ian Weir
Edition: Paperback
Price: CDN$ 14.40
30 used & new from CDN$ 2.60

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars O'Thunder brightens London's dark streets, March 10 2011
This review is from: Daniel O'thunder (Paperback)
Reading Daniel O'Thunder is like looking at early photographs of 19th Century London - gritty, grainy, filled with dark shadows and occasional bright splotches of light. In the midst of this seething city, the devil walks like a lord, committing vile acts upon the city's poorest and weakest - until the day Daniel O'Thunder (failed solider, failed pugalist, ex-alcoholic and recently converted man of God) challenges him to a boxing match. Daniel is an all-too human gold nugget of a character. You can't help but love him and fear for him. Whether you believe in God or not, you root for Daniel to win his hopeless, bravehearted battle for the soul of London. Make no mistake - this is in not a religious book. Told through the eyes of several characters affected by Daniel, Weir's novel is rather a complex exploration of faith and deception, courage and weakness - plus a scary glance into the shadows at the all-too-human face of evil.

I found it impossible to put the book down, but wanted to turn the pages as slowly as possible so the book would never end.

Page: 1