J.Jones

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 62% (13 of 21)
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 448,986 - Total Helpful Votes: 13 of 21
The Right Address by Carrie Karasyov
The Right Address by Carrie Karasyov
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too good to be true, Feb. 15 2005
Recently our book club enjoyed several books, all of which are pretty well known and sought out-so it shouldn't come as much of a surprise that we felt the same way that many others did. McCrae's THE CHILDREN'S CORNER took our breath away with its sordid and deeply probing look at infidelity, loss, love, and the human condition, and the novel PREP wowed us with its concise and straight forward writing and no nonsense way of pacing the plot just so. But THE RIGHT ADDRESS was our favorite. I couldn't put this book down. It is pretty sad to think that this is modeled after real life. If people are so catty at the top, then it is difficult to conceive that people aspire all their lives to… Read more
A Child Called It: One Child's Courage to Survive by Dave Pelzer
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This story A CHILD CALLED IT by David Pelzer is about one child's courage to survive. It takes place in 1973 in Daily City, California where there is a child being abused physically and mentally by his own mother. At first he lives a wonderful life with his whole family but one day all of that changed drastically. His mother beat him and actually told him that she hated him. Hate is a very strong word for a child seven or eight years old. As the story goes on in the book he tries to survive his mother's strong words and beatings. This story is sad but very inspirational to all. I recommend that all people should read this book because it shows a lot about parenting and childhood. If you're… Read more
Joke by Milan Kundera
Joke by Milan Kundera
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it . . . no joke, Feb. 15 2005
The first thing you notice about this brilliant novel is the narration. It switches narrators repeatedly (a technique that Kundera cannot use today because he puts himself into his novels as the first person writer/narrator, much the same way that McCrae does in his "Bark of the Dogwood"). The idea is that events in real life do not come to us fully formed - we hear one point of view, and another, and another, and it is up to us to unravel the various stories to find out what "really" happened. As everyone knows, one person's point of view will never be the same as another's. The Joke's genius lies in its unabashedly saying exactly that.