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victor soare

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 100% (1 of 1)
Location: merrick, ny United States
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 709,313 - Total Helpful Votes: 1 of 1
The Arabian Nights by Husain Haddawy
The Arabian Nights by Husain Haddawy
5.0 out of 5 stars The Arabian Nights, Aug. 25 2001
This is by far the best edition of the Arabian Nights in English. The stories presented here are very different from what one would expect after hearing the fairytales previously titled as such. In fact, the original Arabian Nights (as this is advertised) seems to anticipate many works of western literature in its style, in its action and its character. To give some examples: Prosper Merimee's Carmen (for the first thirty or so pages) relating Carmen's shopping spree is almost identical to the beginning of the story "The Tale of the Porter and The Three Ladies" in this edition of the Nights. This should not be surprising since Merimee was an avid Orientalist and may have borrowed… Read more
The Masterpiece by Emile Zola
The Masterpiece by Emile Zola
4.0 out of 5 stars The Masterpiece, Aug. 25 2001
This book is most likely overlooked as compared to some of Zola's other novels due to the fact that it includes many incidents and themes drawn from his previous works. Zola tends to include "courtesans" in most of his books, and this is no exception; with a scene in which the main chracter (Claude) has a nightly adventure with Mathilde (one such courtesan). About twenty pages dealing with this incident seem transcribed directly from his previous work Nana. Other such examples exist, which may have helped keep the book from universal recognition as compared to others. Another "discrepancy" being detrimental overrall is the ending which, although emotionally packed by… Read more
The Masterpiece by Emile Zola
The Masterpiece by Emile Zola
4.0 out of 5 stars The Masterpiece, Aug. 25 2001
This book is most likely not as well known as some other of Zola's novels due to the fact that it draws too much upon subject matter from his previous works or fails to elaborate upon some themes expressed. Zola tends to include a "courtesan" in almost all his novels, and this is no exception; with one incident pertaining to the main character's adventure with one such courtesan named Mathilde included which could very well have been transcribed from Nana. Other such examples abound, therefore to a certain extent this book has some unoriginal incidents included which are detrimental overall. Another "discrepancy" is the ending, which is in many ways unfulfilling,… Read more