chandp

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 100% (3 of 3)
Location: Fremont, CA USA
Birthday: May 5
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 457,807 - Total Helpful Votes: 3 of 3
Universal Computer by Martin Davis
Universal Computer by Martin Davis
This book traces the contributions of mathematical logicians to the development of modern day computers. Its cast of characters begins with Gottfried Leibnitz in the 17th century, continues with George Boole in the 19th century, Gottlob Frege and David Hilbert straddling the 19th and 20th centuries, and ends with Kurt Goedel, Alan Turing and John von Neumann in the 20th century. The author brings these great scientists to life by describing their works in the context of their lives and times. He shows that despite their exceptional intellects, they often had difficult obstacles to overcome, both in their own frailties as well as in their adversaries.
The book's main theme is that… Read more
Who Is Fourier? a Mathematical Adventure by Transnational College of Lex Tokyo
Who Is Fourier? a Mathematical Adventure by Transnational College of Lex Tokyo
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Adventure, Sept. 29 2001
The motivation for this book is rooted in a club in Japan that is dedicated to learning foreign languages. Its members began to wonder about the sounds of languages, and this curiosity led them to the study of Fourier series, which they applied to analyze spoken sounds.
To start with, this book introduces the concepts behind the Fourier series and the calculation of Fourier coefficients. It then discusses Fourier analysis of the five vowels of the Japanese language. The conclusions are enlightening to say the least.
Rather than end here, as it could have, this book continues on to develop in some detail the mathematics behind the Fourier series. This includes forays into… Read more
The Mathematical Universe: An Alphabetical Journey&hellip by William Dunham
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Delightful Journey, Sept. 29 2001
As the book's subtitle suggests, it is a journey through some of the world's greatest mathematical achievements. It is a collection of quasi-independent essays, loosely patterned after children's ABC picture books.
For me there were two things that made this book a joy to read. One was that, as the preface states, "each chapter provides a strong dose of history." This way each topic was considered in some human context that revealed just how remarkable its development was. The other trait I liked was that while each chapter followed the same basic formula, i.e., some history and then some math, no two chapters were presented in the same way. Thus, Dr. Dunham was able to… Read more