August Murphy-King

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 100% (2 of 2)
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 474,427 - Total Helpful Votes: 2 of 2
Saxophone Colossus (Ltd.Ed) ~ Sonny Rollins
Saxophone Colossus (Ltd.Ed) ~ Sonny Rollins
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, Aug. 30 2004
I was sifting through the reviews already written, and saw someone say that Rollins wasn't as good as people like Paul Desmond and Stan Getz. Frankly, I would have to say that is one of the more ridiculous things I've ever heard said about jazz. Rollins is one of the great masters of jazz, on any insturment. The only tenor player who I can clearly say is better than Rollins is Coltrane.
Saxophone Colossus is the album that essentially made Rollins. With Max Roach, Tommy Flanagan and Doug Watkins, this disc covers everything from the blues, to bop, to ballads, to carribean music. They touch all the bases, and they touch them well. 'St. Thomas' is an incredible song which… Read more
Live At The It Club Comp ~ Thelonious Monk
Live At The It Club Comp ~ Thelonious Monk
I'm a huge Monk fan. I think that he is one of the greatest jazz players to grace the piano bench. Furthermore, this particular quartet of his, made up of three practical 'no-names' plays very tight and together, and this is evident on this CD. Players are best judged by their ability to deliver in the live setting, and Monk and his boys deliver with flying colors here. From cutting blues tracks like 'Straight, No Chaser,' to ripping cuts like 'Well, You Needen't' to ballads like 'Round Midnight,' and standards like 'All the Things you Are,' the band covers all the bases on this recording. Im not Charlie Rouse's biggest fan, but he cuts some awesome solos here, and the rhythm duo of… Read more
Sorcerer ~ Miles Davis
Sorcerer ~ Miles Davis
Davis' 'Second Great Quintet' is my favorite period from Miles' long and brilliant career. Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Tony Williams comprise what I consider the greatest rhythm section in the history of jazz. Gone is the passive and laid back Davis on the 50s, and fully arrived is the new aggressive and attacking Davis tone. The album jumps off to a great start with 'Prince of Darkness', and with the exception of the stupid vocal track at the end of the album (undoubtedly a cheesy Davis tribute to Cicely Tyson). 'Masqualero' and the title track are the other tracks that really jump out at me. Also, Hancock's very spaced out comping style always amazes me, that he has such ability… Read more