Mark Storm

(REAL NAME)
 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 67% (2 of 3)
Location: Mildura, Australia
In My Own Words:
A high school teacher of History and English Literature for over 16 years, I studied Classical Studies, Anthropology, Archaeology, Psychology, Philosophy, Logic and English Literature at Adelaide University, graduating with distinctions. I am fascinated by the ancient world - and what secrets it still holds. I am inspired by artists and writers who seek truth, whether scientific or spiritual tru… Read more

Interests
Literature, Art (not that modern garbage that masquerades as 'art'), Music (I mean MUSIC... not rap... spelled with a silent 'c' at the start)... good food, good wine, good company, travelling, cinema...
... oh...!
... and planting trees.
I like t… Read more
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,143,748 - Total Helpful Votes: 2 of 3
Chrysalids by Carroll & Graf Publishers
Chrysalids by Carroll & Graf Publishers
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
First, a warning. This is not a work for anyone looking a laser beam sci-fi thriller, or Mad Max Road Warrior "after the Bomb" book. Or if you're some High School kid who only picked it up 'cos "teacher made me"... drop it now and get on with getting that Cheer Leader's phone number. Wyndham's visionary and literary genius is best shown in this, his finest work. His better known novel, Day Of The Triffids, superb as it is, pales by comparison. The Chrysalids is a novel that ends on a positive, but very credible note: it has none of the self-indulgent anti-Romanticism of Neuromancer, nor the saccharine 'utopia-ism' of Star Trek at its worst. The story itself, cunningly… Read more
Till We Have Faces: A Myth Retold by C.S. Lewis
'Til We Have Faces' is the sleeper novel of the century. Better than any self-help book for those who are more sinned against than sinful, better than any pop-psychology text, Til We Have Faces addresses the difficult questions of God, justice and life's meaning with underlying compassion and incisive perception. C. S. Lewis re-works the ancient Cupid and Psyche myth. He retains the mythological setting, but this time tells the tale from the point of view of a sister of Psyche; Orual. This 'ugly' sister resents the gods for the injustices of her physical unattractiveness and her consequentially loveless life... and after a lifetime of angst and loss, finally learns a liberating… Read more