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Commentaires écrits par
Ned Middleton (British professional underwater photo-journalist & author)
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Trench: A History of Trench Warfare on the Western Front (General Military)
Trench: A History of Trench Warfare on the Western Front (General Military)
Prix : CDN$ 1.99

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Look no further!, Aug. 26 2014
The 100th anniversary of the start of WW1 was the signal to publish all manner of books and documentary programmes devoted to that particular war. Whereas many of the resultant products suffer from an embarrassing lack of competent research it is always a pleasure to reveal one which stands apart from the rest - if only because it really is that good. As one who spends almost every waking hour immersed in researching lost ships (it’s what I do!), I am aware of the complexities of uncovering relevant and accurate information. Having carefully studied this particular product, it is quite clear author Stephen Bull has mastered the art of finding those all-important facts. Having done so, he has put them together in an immensely readable, educational and hugely enjoyable work.

For those who know little or nothing about ‘Trench Warfare’ - where neither side gained or lost anything appreciable - apart from thousands of lives, this work is a revelation. For those who thought they already knew all there was to know, I suspect it will also prove to be an education. For those who wish to study the subject - look no further.

After an illuminating Introduction, the book commences with an equally informative Chronology which the reader will continue to consult as the book is studied. We are then treated to an overview of the armies involved and of the beginning of Trench Warfare. All soldiers have to ‘dig-in’ and no ground gives way easily when you are using an army-issue folding spade at a time of desperately wanting to become instantly hidden from the enemy. Who would have thought that those first defensive positions across the Western Front would have been extended and modified to such extreme limits.

There then follows chapters on; ‘Trenchtown,’ New Weapons and Tactics, Gas, Raiding & Sniping, Mining, Concrete Bunkers, the Tank and Over the Top before ending with; Conclusion, Notes, Bibliography and Index.

The book is lavishly illustrated throughout with an excellent selection of (mostly b&w) historic photographs which are really impressive for their quality in addition to the breadth of subject covered. Whereas we are often asked to accept poor quality pictures from this period in time, these are particularly outstanding… Of the hundreds of images to consider, I particularly liked the shot of US Lt. Browning firing the machine gun designed by his father and that showing New Zealand soldiers holding massive rifle - designed to penetrate the Tank!

There are also a number of colour plates including trench maps, documents, artwork and colour photographs. These include a wide variety of subjects such as equipment, particular scenes, uniforms and significant personalities - such as Captain Albert Ball who had already earned the VC, DSO and MC by the time he died at the age of 20.

Altogether, I would suggest this is as complete an explanation of the subject as we are likely to find and I congratulate both author and publisher for such an excellent product.

NM
British army major (retired)

US Navy Dreadnoughts 1914-45
US Navy Dreadnoughts 1914-45
by Ryan Noppen
Edition: Paperback
Prix : CDN$ 13.68
25 used & new from CDN$ 5.92

4.0 étoiles sur 5 Contains some fascinating insights., Aug. 19 2014
As mentioned previously, I really do like this series of books. It is amazing how much information plus supporting photography and artwork gets packed into such a short space. In this instance, the subject is the US Dreadnought battleship - which were easily amongst the finest in the world and, in just 48 pages (including Index), we have an overview which is hard to equal.

The arrival of the first (British) Dreadnought-class battleship in 1906 was so revolutionary it immediately rendered all existing battleships (and most other warships) obsolete at a stroke. This was on a par with what the jet engine did for fighter-aircraft many years later and led to all battleships now being described as either Dreadnought or pre-Dreadnought. It also meant that any nation with the requisite capabilities could build themselves a new naval fleet at the same speed as any other. No country embraced the situation better than the USA.

After a perceptive Introduction, the book is divided into the following chapters; South Carolina class, Delaware & Florida classes, Wyoming class, New York class, US Dreadnought Battleship Operations 1914-1918, Inter-war Scrapping, Disarmament & Modernisation and US Dreadnought Battleship Operations 1939-45. These are followed by; Conclusions, Bibliography and Index.

In spite of the size of the product, the story is all there and what makes this work so special is a number of different factors. The choice of historic photographs, for example, really is quite excellent. I particularly like the photograph of Lt. Commander Sims taken in 1919 showing Assistant Secretary to the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt with walking stick… Elsewhere the wide-angle shot of a battleship in a Brooklyn dry-dock almost leaps from the page. Other images include anything from the newspaper cartoons of the day to the widest possible variety of naval subjects.

Nevertheless, it is the artwork which makes this series of books so indispensable. These include side profile and deck views of USS’ Michigan, Delaware and Utah and waterline and full profiles of USS Arkansas. There is also an artistic view of the landing of troops from USS Florida at Veracruz in 1914 (plus a fascinating insight into that particular event!).

I was also particularly pleased to discover the USS Texas preserved at Houston. That ship is possibly the only Dreadnought battleship still in existence and is, therefore, part of world history and I congratulate those responsible for ensuring a single example of the species remains intact. British attitudes towards ancient and historic ships are very different indeed…

All things considered, the book is an excellent overview of the subject, a great place to commence your studies and a work in which some absorbing information comes to light. It is not, however, a definitive work and makes no such claim.

NM

The Tragic Story of the Empress of Ireland
The Tragic Story of the Empress of Ireland
Offered by Penguin Group USA
Prix : CDN$ 10.99

1.0 étoiles sur 5 A book for no purpose whatsoever!, Aug. 16 2014
On 29 May 1914, the 14,000 ton passenger ship Empress of Ireland collided with the 6,000 ton collier Storstadt in the St. Lawrence River, Canada. 1,012 of the 1,477 persons on board the ‘Empress’ perished in the 15 minutes it took the liner to sink. This tragedy occurred just 25 months after the loss of the Titanic and only a short time before Europe was plunged into a conflict which would become known as the Great War, or the War to end all Wars. Whereas the legend of the Titanic lives on (in both fact and in fiction!), the loss of the Empress of Ireland remains largely overlooked and forgotten.

As repeated elsewhere, I am currently engaged in a huge project concerning passenger ships throughout history. My studies have taken me far and wide in addition to having obtained a large number of relevant books and research data. Sadly, many of the more recent works suffer from a malaise which can only be described as wholly reliant on the internet for whatever minimal research was undertaken. Whereas this work first appeared in 1972 - long before such systems became available, the author does seem to have tapped into equally unreliable sources.

Throughout the work we find errors in the number of people on board the ship in addition to a death toll which is exaggerated by an additional 66 lives. Nevertheless, even with such blatant errors, I had hoped to find some snippet of valuable information not mentioned in other sources - albeit in serious need of double checking against something more reliable. There were none!

In addition I found the layout excruciatingly annoying. The book is large print for no apparent reason (it is not advertised as a large print book!), the spacing between paragraphs and sentences is erratic. The spelling was never checked and just as it begins to get remotely interesting, we find the author providing yet another synopsis of events – for the umpteenth time. In short, the entire product is exceedingly poor.

This book struggles to provide a decent narrative of the events on that fateful day when so many people died. It struggles to hold the reader’s attention and does nothing to allow the imagination to visualize the events in question. When all these criticisms are added to the simple fact that the basic information (times, dates, tonnages, death toll, numbers of people etc) are suspect, then the book exists for little or no purpose whatsoever.

NM

Hong Kong 1941-45: First Strike in the Pacific War (Campaign)
Hong Kong 1941-45: First Strike in the Pacific War (Campaign)
Prix : CDN$ 9.99

4.0 étoiles sur 5 The invasion and occupation of Hong Kong explained., Aug. 15 2014
These publishers produce a number of similar-looking books which include different themes. One is devoted to specific warships, vehicles or weapons of war and another provides comparisons between opposing sides such as German soldier vs. Russian soldier or two types of warship and so forth. Another topic within this arrangement is specific battles such as, for example; “The Naval Battles of Guadalcanal.” The one outstanding feature from all these works, however, is the excellent artwork provided by different artists. This particular book is written by Benjamin Lai and illustrated by Giuseppe Rava - both of whom are new to me.

Having served in Hong Kong with 7th Gurkha Rifles (1979-1981), I found certain elements of the book particularly fascinating - if only because I had been to the site in question. That, however, is no precondition for anyone wishing to similarly enjoy this excellent work.

On the day after Pearl Harbour, Imperial Japanese Forces issued instruction for the invasions of the Philippines, Thailand, Malaya and the tiny British Colony of Hong Kong. Because of its relative lack of importance, the occupation of Hong Kong is largely overlooked. This work, however, provides a full appraisal of those dark days and of the brutality which became synonymous with Japanese military behaviour throughout WW2. I deliberately mention this aspect because the author provides a potted account of the sinking of the Lisbon Maru. Of the 1,834 (British and Commonwealth) POWs who were captured in Hong Kong and placed aboard that ship, only 716 eventually survived!

In a well-thought-out work, we commence with an Introduction and Chronology of Events which combine perfectly to set the scene for the detailed descriptions which follow. Here we find short biographies of the two opposing commanders, an assessment of the opposing forces, the ‘Order of Battle’ and the different plans employed by each side. The ‘Battle for Hong Kong’ was not a single engagement. Instead we learn of the 2nd MTB Flotilla - which carried out a suicidal attack on Japanese craft which were landing troops, the Battle of North Point Power Station, the Annihilation of East Brigade, the Battle for Wongneichong Gap (Where W02 Osborne (Winnipeg Grenadiers) was killed earning the first Canadian VC of WW2) and much more besides. These are followed by ‘The Aftermath’ and ‘The Battlefield Today.’

The well written text is made all the more interesting by the anecdotes and snippets of personal information that might so easily have been overlooked. The Japanese commander, for example, visited his wounded troops in hospital – something which was very rare for Japanese generals. On the other side, Major General Francis Festing was twice appointed GOC Hong Kong and later went on to become a Field Marshall.

It is, however, the artwork which I most admire. In this instance we have standard maps showing advances made by troops and the movement of boats in addition to those which show the ground in sharp relief. Elsewhere there are artistic interpretations of the land and sea battles. These and the accompanying text are all supported by a first-rate selection of historic and modern images thoughtfully produced in order to convey the intended message. All things considered, I really can’t think of a better way in which the invasion and occupation of Hong Kong might have been explained.

NM
British army major (retired)

German Infantryman vs Soviet Rifleman: Barbarossa 1941 (Combat)
German Infantryman vs Soviet Rifleman: Barbarossa 1941 (Combat)
Prix : CDN$ 9.99

4.0 étoiles sur 5 Well worth studying!, Aug. 14 2014
There are a number of books within this excellent series from Osprey where one side of a particular force is compared to its opposite number (E-Boat vs. MTB and German Commerce Raider vs. British Cruiser to name two). They are not designed to reveal which side might have won in straightforward and equal combat (if ever there was such a thing!) but are, instead a comparison of whatever features, equipment, weapons, strengths and weaknesses existed at the time. Having studied the work, readers can then make up their own mind.

This particular work studies every aspect of the German and Soviet infantry soldier at the time of Barbarossa and is particularly well detailed for a work of only 80 pages. After an informative introduction, we find 7 main Chapters as follows; (1) The Opposing Sides (Origins and combat role - Recruitment, morale and logistics - Leadership and communications - Armament, training and tactics), (2) Zhlobin 6 July 1941, (3) Smolensk 15-23 July 1941, (4) Vas’kovo-Voroshilovo 23-27 July 1941, (5) Analysis (Lessons learned by the Germans and by the Soviets), (6) Aftermath and (7) Unit Organisations. The work then concludes with Bibliography and Index.

With fully detailed military maps showing the opposing forces, the Introduction explains how the battles developed throughout July 1941. We then find the makeup of each side - right down to their background, morale, leadership, training and weapons. In the first of yet another excellent series of artwork, pages 20-21 show the fully equipped German soldier from front and rear with all his equipment, as carried, fully captioned. Four pages later we find exactly the same for the Soviet soldier which reveals considerable differences. Zhlobin, Smolensk and Vas’kovo-Voroshilovo are explained in an insightful and factual manner with each battle once again accompanied by first class military-style maps. As one reads these accounts, however, what catches the imagination are the small snapshots of peripheral events and information such as a short bio of a particular commander or a German officer being decorated in the field - all improving the overall fascination factor.

Personally, I found this particular treatment of Barbarossa wholly captivating and made even more exciting by the artwork for which this series of books is renowned. That, coupled an immensely readable style of writing and an equally excellent series of historic images makes this book well worth studying.

NM
British army major (retired)

French Tanks of World War II (2): Cavalry Tanks and AFV's (New Vanguard)
French Tanks of World War II (2): Cavalry Tanks and AFV's (New Vanguard)
Prix : CDN$ 9.99

4.0 étoiles sur 5 Absolutely fascinating!, Aug. 14 2014
This series of books continues to provide what is, for me at least, the best possible grounding into the specifics of each subject covered. In this instance, the publishers have tackled the subject of French Tanks from WW2 in two editions and this (the second) covers Cavalry Tanks and AFVs. Though never a ‘cavalry man’ myself, I did once command a Scout Car on duty in Northern Ireland and also later served with a Cavalry Regiment and have been ‘locked down inside’ during simulated NBC attacks. Whereas, therefore, my experience might be described as the bare minimum, I do have a little (very little!) from my past service on which to draw when studying the work. Having said that, I found it absolutely fascinating!

The work commences with an appreciation of ‘Early Efforts at Cavalry Mechanisation’ which provides a great introduction. This is followed by three major chapters - each with as number of sub-headings as follows; (1) The Weygand Reforms; (Renault AMR 33, Renault AMR 35, Renault AMC, Somua S35, Hotchkiss H35, Hotchkiss H39, Panhard AMD 35 and Cavalry Mechanisation). (2) French Tanks and the 1940 Campaign; (Technical assessment and the turret problem, the Radio Gap, Legends of the Campaign, Tank Strength May 1940, the 1930s Arms Race and Cumulative Tank Production 1931-40 and French Tank Deployment May 1940). (3) French Tanks after the 1940 Armistice; (Cavalry AMDs in Colonies September 1939, Operation Exporter, Operation Torch and Tank Development in Vichy France). The book then concludes with Further Reading and Index.

From the above, the reader will gain a full appreciation of the subject although, (having missed it!) I did think I should have read the aforementioned earlier work first. Nevertheless, this is a full appraisal of the vehicles covered and one which will be most useful to those studying the subject.

Once again, no praise is too high for the outstanding artwork which sets this series of books apart from anything else. Eleven of the vehicles are carefully produced in original livery, side profile with numerous regimental motifs shown either on the tank/AFV or separately alongside. Across pages 20-21 there is a complete cutaway sectional diagram of the Somua S35. Elsewhere we find line drawings of these vehicles including some which show the crew on board in their operational positions. In addition there is an excellent selection of historic photographs alongside a small number of more recent (colour) images of vehicles which have been carefully preserved.

All things considered, another excellent introduction to the subject.

NM
British army major (retired)

British Superliners of the Sixties: A Design Appreciation of the "Oriana", "Canberra" and "Q. E. II"
British Superliners of the Sixties: A Design Appreciation of the "Oriana", "Canberra" and "Q. E. II"
by Philip S. Dawson
Edition: Paperback
6 used & new from CDN$ 6.44

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Sets the standards for ‘research!’, Aug. 12 2014
As part of a very lengthy and time-consuming project, I am currently studying passenger ships from the earliest to the most recent. Whereas I encounter as many excellent books as I do those which are simply inferior. This product truly stands apart for being not just original and factually correct but also for the depth of research completed. It also says much for the product that my only criticism is so minuscule it is mentioned only to underline the point. The full title of the book does not appear on the cover. After the main heading, there is also a sub-title which reads “A Design Appreciation of the Oriana, Canberra and QE2.” If, therefore, you purchased the book in the expectation of finding many more ships, you might be disappointed - although I have no idea which others from the period might also be described as ‘Superliners.’

Personally, I never saw either the Oriana or the QE2 although I do recall being in Gibraltar in 1977 when both the Canberra and HMS Ark Royal were in port. Both were truly magnificent ships and, in my opinion, neither should have been scrapped - but I digress.

After a useful and informative Foreword and Introduction, the book commences with a hugely insightful and well-researched appraisal of ‘the state of the industry in 1955’ as far as P & O were concerned. Although two new ships (Arcadia and Iberia) had just been completed, these were pretty much ‘same old’ and the company were aware that something new and exciting was required. With the curious title of ‘The 20/20 Ship’ the following chapter provides full details of the thinking at that time which is an amazing history of the reasoning behind whatever decisions were made.

This is followed by ‘The Design Process’ in which we learn so much more - including the attitudes and opinions of the builders and of the problems brought about by design changes during construction. Then we come on to the three ships in question. Here we find fascinating comparisons with other vessels - noted for what innovative design feature they possessed and is now featured in the new ships. It was interesting to see which ships were noted for whatever aspect we now take for granted.

From this point onwards each of the three vessels is laid bare from every conceivable angle and description. Whatever detail you are seeking to study is very likely to be found here. Each of the three ships is afforded a deck-by-deck plan alongside everything from the way in which the ingress of natural daylight was considered as part of the planning process to the double-skinned partitions used in Canberra’s construction. All of which are mentioned in order to underline the way in which this work is so complete.

Although there are several pages with no images at all, the entire work is lavishly supported with historic photographs, line-drawings and plans.

When it comes to books about ships and the sea, Conway Maritime are a leading authority. Even so, this particular book is exceptional for the detail, research and those profound insights into the history of passenger/cruise travel in the mid 1950s and of the thinking that went into the production of three such magnificent vessels.

NM

Great White Shark by Ellis, Richard, McCosker, John (1995) Paperback
Great White Shark by Ellis, Richard, McCosker, John (1995) Paperback
by Richard, McCosker, John Ellis
Edition: Paperback

4.0 étoiles sur 5 Detailed study of a complex creature., Aug. 8 2014
Stereotypically, the Shark is portrayed as the very epitome of evil in a manner never applied to terrestrial hunter-killers. None of the big cats or even-bigger bears (and the Polar Bear will actively hunt man!) are as feared as the Shark and none more so than the Great White. Part of the myth may be attributed to their being underwater and, therefore, largely unseen. Nevertheless, people do not go in search of Lions and Bears with raw meat and blood smeared over their clothes in order to attract them to the camera. So why people should react with horror and revulsion when the marine environment's apex predator responds - just as any other hungry creature would respond!, to such freely distributed blood and guts is beyond my understanding.

This book is just about as complete a study of a single species of fish as one might hope to find. Comparisons with other Sharks are included but only serve to complete the work. Before considering the content, however, I do have two criticisms. Richard Ellis is clearly a talented artist but the head-to-body dimensions of his painting of a Great White which appears on the cover are at odds with the dimensions shown in the many of the photographs used throughout the book. Not quite the equivalent of a pony's head on the body of a Shire horse but close.

My other criticism is that Ron and Valerie Taylor are mentioned on 22 pages of this book which would have been much improved had they been absent altogether. In one photograph, Valerie Taylor seeks to portray herself as the female equivalent of medallion man by leaning forward to show maximum cleavage and deliberately reveal the fact that she wears the tooth of a Great White around her neck. Wow! How hard is that! Her questionable antics of attracting sharks to her arm - over which is fitted a chain mail suit covered in bits of fish, blood and gore has done more to demonise the shark than anything else apart from, perhaps, the film Jaws. If only she would try the same stunt with a tine hat! For me, these antics do nothing more than demonstrate the Taylor's overall lack of objectivity and show how they would do just about anything to promote themselves with the Shark being nothing more than a means to that end.

Nevertheless, this low quality and wholly irrelevant contribution should not be allowed to spoil an otherwise good product. By ignoring those pages on which the Taylors are mentioned, we are able to fully appreciate the product.

The historic detail was particularly refreshing with material I had not previously seen. The section on close relatives and a comparisons with the Megalodon are first rate and very instructive. The biology and morphology of the creature also combine to provide the reader with equal measures of educational and technical detail whilst retaining the book's overall readable quality. Shark attacks then takes up 50 pages and, although those well-known and over-used photos of Henri Bource and Rodney Fox make an obligatory appearance, the remainder is both fascinating and informative. There then follows items about fishing, the Great White in captivity and comments about that wretched film Jaws.

In a somewhat contradictory ending, we find the heading "Can we save the Great White Shark?" On that subject, I would have expected to find a Taylor-free zone but instead, this well-past-their-sell-by-date, shark-fighting, less-than-dynamic, diving duo from down under are there with the female half looking like Barbie Doll at 80! Page 246 shows a photo of a young boy wearing a T-shirt. The caption reads "Andrew Guest wearing a "Save the Shark" t-shirt; a gift from Valerie Taylor." All things considered, just about her entire contribution to the subject - onbe lousy T-shirt!

Overall, I was tempted to remove a second star for contradiction, but the fact remains this is a pretty good offering. All the technical, background information is here and for that I am grateful.

NM

Gone for a Soldier: Recollections by John Stanier
Gone for a Soldier: Recollections by John Stanier
by John Stanier
Edition: Paperback
Prix : CDN$ 23.33

1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Perhaps it’s me?, July 31 2014
I have always taken a great interest in the written works and biographies of some of our senior generals and field marshalls but this particular officer has worried me for some years. Perhaps I am wrong but consider this: In addition to the Knighthood (GCB) which went automatically with the office of ‘Chief of the General Staff’ (professional head of the British Army), Field Marshal Sir John Stanier wore 5 medal ribbons in the order; MBE, Defence Medal (WW2), War Medal 1939-45, Coronation Medal (1953) and Silver Jubilee Medal 1977.

Leaving aside the Coronation and Silver Jubilee Medals which were struck to commemorate historic moments in the reign of HM the Queen, he was appointed MBE in 1961 for his work as a major. Although doubtless well-deserved, this will have been for a peace-time contribution above and beyond the call of duty for, perhaps, important improvements or the production of a valuable report or whatever.

The remaining two WW2 medals were awarded to servicemen and women (including the Home Guard and Fire Service) who served in uniform during that conflict and were not issued after hostilities ceased in 1945. These were not for any form of active service or operational role - for which other medals were issued.

Whereas, therefore, we have a latter day Field Marshall with NO active service whatsoever, we also have the curious anomaly of a former soldier with two medals from WW2 who, according to military records and also sources on the internet, did not commence his own service until 1946?

NM
British army major (retired)

Writers' and Artists' Yearbook 2015
Writers' and Artists' Yearbook 2015
Prix : CDN$ 14.76

1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The aspiring writer’s best friend!, July 31 2014
Time was when the British education system was so deliberately exploited that every year only the same exact number of top 10-11 year-old pupils were allowed to progress towards a proper senior educational structure known as Grammar School. Only they would receive a formal certificate of education and, of course, for the majority, Grammar School was the only route to university. All other children were instantly categorised for life as ‘shop-floor’ workers who neither required nor deserved anything more than a basic understanding of reading and writing. Sadly, even that was too large a task for most of the mediocre tutors with my own English teacher, for example, believing ‘Shakespeare’ was something an athlete did with a javelin. It was an education system secondary by name and second-rate by nature!

Consequently, when (many years later) I produced my first book - people laughed. In my own particular case I had taken the only escape route available from the repetitious drudgery expected of me by joining the army at the age of 15. By the time I came to pen that tome, however, I had become somewhat proficient at scuba diving - a sport in which I was highly qualified and widely experienced. Even so, one senior officer actually said to me “By what right do you seek to write a book about Scuba Diving?” In spite of such people, I am now described as an award-winning, best-selling author. Naturally, I would dearly love to send a copy of one of my works to that old English teacher - but I fear some of the words used in every-day scuba diving might prove beyond his limited capabilities…

My point, however, is even more simple than the structure which rejected the majority of the British youth of yesterday by its preconceived notion of ‘what the country needed’ and that point is that ANY would-be writer can produce a work worthy of being read by strangers (the ultimate test for any book!) provided the drive to see it through remains undiminished. You must not allow those wretched detractors to extinguish any bright shining light of original creativity!

Of course, writing is only part of the process and many authors will have no idea what to do next. Of all the aids which might be described as ‘the aspiring writer’s best friend,’ few compare favourably to this one. Aimed primarily at the UK market, this is not just a collection of addresses for book publishers and magazine editors. Instead, it contains almost everything you might need to know when writing for the different categories of; Books, Magazines, Newspapers, Poetry, TV, Film, Radio, Theatre and so forth. The advice given and lists of outlets is then followed by sections on; Literary Agents, Art & Illustration, Societies, Prizes and Festivals, Online, Resources, Copyright & Libel and Finance and covers almost every element of publishing. Whereas there are a few changes to last year’s edition, the publisher contacts each contributor ever year in a bid to extract accurate and up-to-date information and cannot, therefore, be blamed for those who fail to respond. Having mentioned such imperfections, what you get is as near-perfect as is possible to achieve.

Book publishers also include their areas of expertise. If you write, say, children’s fiction there is no point in submitting your work to a publisher who concentrates solely on, say, Greek history (or whatever). Having identified your market, there is also advice on how to present your manuscript and other tips. In summary, therefore, we have the widest possible appreciation for the aspiring writer (and artist!) and had I been in possession of a copy - 30 years ago!, my own particular journey would have been so much smoother! And if you are still disheartened, just consider how many times the first Harry Potter novel was rejected!

Finally, having read this far, may I now suggest you ask yourself; ‘Can I afford to be without a copy of this book?’

And good luck.

NM

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