Auto boutiques-francophones Protegez vos photos et videos personnelles pinata Furniture Kindle Films selection Jazz, Blues et musique actuelle Cycling Barbecue

Votre évaluation(Effacer)Évaluez cet article


Un problème s'est produit lors du filtrage des commentaires. Veuillez réessayer plus tard.

Affichage de 1-10 sur 49 commentaires(3 étoiles)afficher tous les commentaires
le 11 mai 2004
Northern Lights is quite well written however the reader is lost in a weak begining which begins in the action. I don't really like this book.
This essay was written in the classroom.
In Northern Lights, by Philip Pullman, readers meet for the first time 11-year-old Lyra Belacqua, a precocious orphan growing up within the precincts of Jordan College in Oxford, England. It quickly becomes clear that Lyra's Oxford is not precisely like our own - nor is her world. In Lyra's world, everyone has a personal dæmon, a lifelong animal familiar. This is a world in which science, theology and magic are closely entwined.
Northern Lights is set in a world that parallels ours in many ways, yet very different. In this world lives Lyra, a girl left to be raised amongst the staff and scholars of Jordan College in Oxford, a sprawling mass of gothic buildings, great halls, subterranean passages and secret crypts. Pg 47 'Ancient stone arches rose above them supported by pillars as thick as ten trees...'
What makes Lyra and her kind different and alien to us is that she carries with her a lifelong companion. The companion is the person's daemon, something like a human soul but instead of being unseen it is alive and vibrant, sharing and responding to moods and feelings. Pg 16 "... and Lyra felt the force of his glance almost as if it had physical form, as if it were an arrow or a spear." As a child, Lyra's dæmon Pantalaimon still has not settled to one constant form, and so he changes to suit her mood, desire or situation. Pg 73 "...though Patalaimon wouldn't settle...when he became a hedgehog out of pique.' As she grows up, Lyra's true personality will become apparent, and it is only at this point that Pantalaimon will take on his true form in reflection of this development.
The study of science, theology and magic are very important to these people. The church still holds much of the power, dictating what is and what is not a valid course of scientific study. In doing so, boards are set up to perform scientific research. People who get in the way of the church will be prosecuted. The level of scientific knowledge is similar to ours but more advanced in the spiritual/magical realm.
Overall this book was ok- good enough to read the triology.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 25 mars 2004
"Start with a character, and you'll find you've got a type. Start with a type, and you'll find you've got nothing."
In "The Golden Compass" Philip Pullman writes 'types', not characters. I struggled through hundreds of pages wondering why in the world I was supposed to like Lyra. I didn't, and I still don't. Why? She's a type, not a character. She's an icon of childhood ideals of sorts. A spritely, lively, free-spirited, exuberant thing. ie.) Moderately uninteresting caricature of childlike innocence.
Pullman writes children like somebody who's studied them in psychology texts in order to write for them, but has never spoken to one. The writing otherwise is solid, and locales are nicely rendered, but I got bored fast with the use of his characters as nothing but wooden puppets to hang his pseudo-spiritual/metaphysical ideas and gadgets on. His personal philosophies are the real star of these stories, and it quickly becomes tiresome. Good essay material, yes. Compelling storytelling? Not really.
Too much is arbitrary or unexplained besides. Why are there talking bears in a world otherwise grounded in realism, when other animals are just that? What IS dust anyway? You'll be three hundred pages in before you realize not a compelling word of explanation has been offered yet. String a reader along long enough, and he'll just stop caring. I was waist-deep in this story when I just stopped caring. The longer it got, the more acutely, annoyingly aware I became that this story was subdivided to cover three books for commercial reasons. The Golden Compass is, putting it simply, chock full of filler meant to spread the narrative thin enough to sell two more episodes. What ARE daemons? What about Iorek and the bears? Dust? Mrs Coulter? Ultimately, a lot more questions are raised than answered, but I simply stopped caring about the outcome. I don't think I'll be purchasing the next two books.
Pullman is popular because his themes appeal to the present social/philosophical prejudices of the literary establishment. But that really doesn't change the fact that it's all pretty hamfisted, archetypical, and just plain uninteresting as a story. Neat ideas (though admittedly, blatant propaganda) marred by very average storytelling and one-dimensional characters. Stick to Rowling, Tolkien, and Lewis, not necessarily in that order.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 10 mars 2004
I picked up The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman because I'd heard a lot of great reviews about it, and that it was recommended as a book for younger readers.
It quickly became clear to me that, like the Potter series, this book is targeted at younger readers. The language and tone of the text are straightforward and have that compelling pull that draws the younger reader in, as if the author is sharing a secret story.
The story is that of a young orphan-of-sorts girl, Lyra, who has been allowed to mostly run wild and free in Oxford, among a bunch of dusty scholars. It begins with Lyra's unstoppable curiosity to see one of the "forbidden" rooms, where she finds herself trapped in a closet sneaking peaks and hearing tidbits of information that don't make a whole lot of sense to her.
When playing with Roger and their gyptian friends, Lyra starts to hear stories about Gobblers that kidnap children. Not much later, she is suddenly taken away from Oxford by Mrs Coulter, a beautiful lady unknown to Lyra. She enjoys staying with Mrs Coulter in London for a while, but all the beautiful surroundings have a dark undertone. It is up to Lyra to discover the secret behind the Gobblers and save the missing children - or that's what she thinks, anyway.
There is a dark twist to the story at the end. And of course there is the rest of the series to read if you want to know what happened after the cliffhanger left by Pullman.
The book is certainly compelling and unique in it storyline. It is a children's story in that it features mainly children and Lyra, a child, is the heroine. That's not to say that many adults won't enjoy the series (many adults also read Harry Potter).
Personnally, I was not entirely swept away by the book, in spite of all the positive points above. Maybe it's because the story is meant to be told to children. For example, Lyra often has the tendency to fall asleep, which I found somewhat annoying and thought could have been edited more thoughtfully. The overall tone and approach of the book did not sit well with me, but I think that's a matter of personal taste.
I would certainly recommend this book to younger readers, especially those with a passion for fantasy. As with all good stories, there are dark corners in this book, but I think that makes it stand out. Life isn't all roses, so why should books be? A good story requires danger and obstacles to overcome, and if Lyra fell asleep a little less often she might actually make a convincing heroine.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 7 octobre 2003
I really liked the concept behind this book. But, Pullman's implementation is lacking. First, I have problems believing that any 11-year old (even one in a fantasy novel) could or would behave as the one in this book does. Heck, you could push her to the age of majority (18) and I still would have the same problem. Second, the novel's world doesn't make sense. Yes, I know it's an alternate reality. But, the mish-mash of technologies present are silly. For the most part, the culture seems to work on a set of technology from the 1500s to the 1800s. But, then there are things thrown in which indicate technology from the 1900s or 2000s. I just can't come up with a logical technology tree that would allow this to happen. And, finally, all the characters around the protagonist are basically cardboard cutouts: they have no depth of personality. For instance, I still can't figure out what's motivating all these bad guys to do the horrible things they're doing to these children. Sure, near the end, Pullman explained what they think "Dust" is. But, I still can't see how these people made the leap from having that knowledge to, essentially, mutilating and killing children.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 30 juin 2003
I just finished book 3 of the trilogy, and I have to admit I'm quite disturbed. All three are extremely well written. The characters are fully realized. There were a few brief moments where I felt the "hand of the author" tweak the plot to make something happen, but for the most part I was convinced by the world the author had created. However, PARENTS SHOULD BE WARNED BEFORE LETTING THEIR CHILDREN READ THESE BOOKS! Pullman has been compared to C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. Lewis and Tolkien write from and use metaphor to express their Christian beliefs. Pullman blatently attacks all religion. Parents should be aware of the following (Normally I would never give away plot points in a review but in this case I feel I have to make an exception): In these books God is senile, the blblical Enoch is now a power mad angel who lusts after women and is trying to take over all worlds, the afterlife is depicted as a prison camp, and the only way for the world to be saved is when two twelve year old children become lovers. Depending on how you feel about things you may also be shocked to find the two main angels who help our hero and heroine are gay. Pullman's point, ultimately, is that you can take one of two paths in life: Religion, which is followed by the "stupid" (his words, not mine) and Wisdom. In Pullman's world the two aren't compatable. I give it three stars for the writing, though I completely disagree with the message.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 6 février 2003
While the author tells a fast-moving story, the problem here is that the world brave Lyra finds herself in is so transparent that it's hard to feel as though it actually could exist. It seems to have qualities of the real world, but its supernatural apects are never fully explained. Perhaps the point is that since there are so many alternate universes, Lyra's is just one that has similarities to ours but is not the same. The difficulty here is that the author fails to create a place that is different enough to make the reader convinced that what he or she is reading has any depth to it. Sure, every human has a deamon, and witches and talking bears predominate, but there's no history to this world. No sense that Lyra is part of some order of beings that has been around for eons, or something that would stand as a means by which her quest would have some meaning.
The best part of the novel is that it's not clear who is more harmful, Mrs. Coulter or Lord Asriel. The children who come to harm upon puberty are threatened by them both, I think. The moral universe is more interesting that the physical one, I think. Most adults feel they always act in a child's best interest but of course not all do. That adults inevtiably screw up kids is a common notion, and innocence lost at puberty is an old theme of pop-culture (Stephen King's 'Carrie' for instance.) Most frustratingly, the reader never gets to feel what Lyra experiences; she seems to have little understanding of herself as a young woman. Perhaps that is left to the second book. But the world Pullman creates is so vague and its threats so ill-defined that it's hard to care what happens to any of his characters.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 1 février 2003
The Golden Compass is a page-turner and an adventure to be sure. But I think the reason I really enjoyed it is that I know the characters and creatures of Pullman's fantasy world will stay with me for a long, long, time. They remind me of the characters from L'Engle's 'Time' quartet: passionate, conflicted, flawed, but never, ever, boring and very, very, memorable.
This is not a simple sci-fi tale; the ideas are complex and novel. The daemons are fascinating and very appealing. The different cultures of the Scholars, gyptians, witches and armored bears are original as well. Even inanimate objects (the alethiometer, Dust, anbaric charges) play very interesting roles in this story. Also very effective is Pullman's choice to set his tale in a world that very similar to our own, but different in a few startling ways. These differences are never spelled out explicitly for the reader, which leaves you feeling much like the main character Lyra, i.e. caught up in the adventure and hungry to fill in the missing bits of information. A great read!
However, when I read the next two books in the series, I was very disappointed. They resonate with deep disappointment in Christianity and especially Catholicism. We are served up God as a dying angel and the Church as a mix of murderers, pedophilic priests, and inquisitors. Christ, unsurprisingly, is nowhere to be found. After all, a loving Christ who gave his life to bring people closer to God and free them from sin and death would not fit into Pullman's assessment of the Church as being interested only in obliterating every good feeling and impulse. As I mentioned in my review of the last book, I don't object to Pullman listing the abuses of the Christian Church, past or present. I think that's a worthy subject. But in writing this kind of one-sided portrayal, Pullman is at best attacking a straw man, and at worst , is offensive and deeply misleading, especially to children. Even C.S. Lewis's treatment of the Calormenes in the Narnian Chronicles, which has justly come under fire for tones of racism, is more positive and balanced than this stuff (and Lewis was writing fifty years ago, after all). I'd urge anyone who wishes to proceed with the rest of the series to take it all with a large grain of salt.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 23 novembre 2002
Compared to the vast majority of fantasy novels, The Golden Compass is a thorn in the side of redundancy. This, however, does not mean that this book is excellent, though, and unfortunatley.
Philip Pullman creates an alternate universe that is not all too different from ours. If I were to place his universe in our timline, I would say it fits the WWI era best, the big giveaway being the existance of zeppelins.
One of the biggest additions to this universe, though, is the existance of daemons, or one creature that is linked to one human. The daemon can talk and take the form of about any animal, but they normally prefer one form over all others. The human and daemon may seem very seperate, but once you read the chapter entitled "The Silver Guillotine", you'll realize how much the one needs the other. That chapter contains one of the most powerful scenes in the book, but you won't get to it until you're more than halfway through.
Which leads me to my biggest problem with this book. It's original, yes, but dreadfully slow, especially towards the beginning. Thinking back, all I can recall is the awkward meeting with Lord Asriel, Oxford, and heading north while trying to stay away from Mrs. Coulter. The character development, I must admit, is above average, but the plot suffers as a result. However, once I got to the part entitled "Bolvangar", the book started to pick up to a proper pace, finally coming to an end that reminded me of the end of the novel Hannibal by Thomas Harris.
If it weren't for the fact that the ending was somewhat satisfying, I would have rated this book less, but even as it stands, I really didn't find it all that exciting. Take your Alethiometer and ask it about a better book, I'm sure it'll come up with something better.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 23 novembre 2002
Compared to the vast majority of fantasy novels, The Golden Compass is a thorn in the side of redundancy. This, however, does not mean that this book is excellent, though, and unfortunatley.
Philip Pullman creates an alternate universe that is not all too different from ours. If I were to place his universe in our timline, I would say it fits the WWI era best, the big giveaway being the existance of zeppelins.
One of the biggest additions to this universe, though, is the existance of daemons, or one creature that is linked to one human. The daemon can talk and take the form of about any animal, but they normally prefer one form over all others. The human and daemon may seem very seperate, but once you read the chapter entitled "The Silver Guillotine", you'll realize how much the one needs the other. That chapter contains one of the most powerful scenes in the book, but you won't get to it until you're more than halfway through.
Which leads me to my biggest problem with this book. It's original, yes, but dreadfully slow, especially towards the beginning. Thinking back, all I can recall is the awkward meeting with Lord Asriel, Oxford, and heading north while trying to stay away from Mrs. Coulter. The character development, I must admit, is above average, but the plot suffers as a result. However, once I got to the part entitled "Bolvangar", the book started to pick up to a proper pace, finally coming to an end that reminded me of the end of the novel Hannibal by Thomas Harris.
If it weren't for the fact that the ending was somewhat satisfying, I would have rated this book less, but even as it stands, I really didn't find it all that exciting. Take your Alethiometer and ask it about a better book, I'm sure it'll come up with something better.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
le 3 novembre 2002
The Golden Compass is a pretty spellbinding novel. Take caution though. This book is like a good first date--it might be fun, but if you keep going without looking too closely, you're gonna end up involved with an unsavory character.
As for the book itself:
It is a derivative (shades of Milton, Blake, Lewis and Yeats here) yet entertaining adventure. A little girl (of questionable nature) gets wrapped up in events that end up dragging her across the vastness of the Polar regions on an alternate Earth. There she finds adventure, friendship, triumph and tragedy.
Pullman creates some wonderful side characters, most notably the great armored bear Iorek Byrnison, the sharpshooting Texan Lee Scoresby, and the witch queen Serafina Pekkala.
For abject terror, one cannot beat the scene Pullman has written in his Bolvangar.
Yet, for as good as this book gets, there are glimpses even here in the first book of how politically correct and preachy (one might also throw in blasphemous) Pullman eventually gets in the second and third books of the series. The scene between Lord Asriel and Mrs. Coulter is the prime example here.
Therefore--since this book is little more than a beautifully paved road to nowhere--I don't recommend it.
0CommentaireCette évaluation a-t-elle été utile pour vous?OuiNonEnvoi du commentaire en cours...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas pu enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
His Dark Materials Box Set
His Dark Materials Box Set by Philip Pullman (Paperback - May 27 2003)
CDN$ 20.23

The Subtle Knife: His Dark Materials
The Subtle Knife: His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman (Paperback - May 22 2001)
CDN$ 8.99

The Amber Spyglass: His Dark Materials
The Amber Spyglass: His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman (Paperback - May 27 2003)
CDN$ 8.99