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iPhone and iPad App 24-Hour Trainer Paperback – May 1 2012


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Product Description

From the Back Cover

Dive into the exciting world of iOS app development!

Are you eager to jump on the app bandwagon but are unfamiliar with iOS or perhaps lack coding experience? If so, this all-in-one tutorial is exactly what you need to get started on your journey of iOS application development. Aimed at getting novices up to speed and into the app action, this book-and-DVD package provides you with nearly 40 instructive lessons. Each lesson introduces a single topic, each building in complexity as you walk through the steps to create a simple iOS application.

iPhone and iPad App 24-Hour Trainer:

  • Offers a clear introduction to iOS, providing you with a solid foundation of a development environment

  • Walks you through the basics of object-oriented programming principles and key Objective-C concepts

  • Explores Cocoa Touch and demonstrates how to use the Cocoa Touch® framework

  • Discusses Storyboards, iCloud document storage, Core Image, Twitter integration, Map Kit, Core Location, and Core Motion

  • Features helpful appendices that cover on-device testing, Ad Hoc distribution, Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), and App Store distribution

24-Hour Trainers offer a unique book-and-video package that delivers step-by-step lessons for handling real-world scenarios. Each lesson in the book is accompanied by an instructional video that reinforces the content while providing additional explanations and tips.

Hours of Video

Don't just learn—do!

Each lesson in the book is accompanied by an instructional video.

You'll learn to:

  • Use Storyboards

  • Incorporate Twitter

  • Use iCloud document storage

  • Incorporate iTunes file sharing

  • Use Core Motion

  • Perform image processing with Core Image

  • Incorporate printing

  • Work with tab bars, navigation controllers, and table views

  • Create page-based applications and views that scroll

  • Incorporate touches and gestures

  • Build universal applications

  • Use Map Kit

  • Build background-aware apps

Please see the DVD appendix for details and complete system requirements.

About the Author

Abhishek Mishra is a UK based mobile applications consultant with over 13 years' experience in the software industry. He holds an MRes in Computer Science from the University of London. He is the director of ASM Technology Ltd, and teaches iOS development to professionals in the advertising industry. He currently hosts and publishes www.idevmag.com.

Gene Backlin has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry. He is the owner and principal consultant of MariZack consulting, teaches at DePaul University, and is the author of Professional iPhone and iPad Application Development.


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Amazon.com: 4 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Disappointed March 11 2013
By Ron McMahon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I've been developing in the Basic / Visual Basic realm for more than three decades and have dozens of commercial and corporate apps to my name. I'm not a novice in the mobile space either, having built cutting-edge pen-based apps in the 1990s, but my work has never needed to be in C or C++ so I have no skills in this language.

I'm excited about the iPhone / iPad platform and have solid plans for two or three apps, but I need to learn Objective-c and the Xcode development environment. Yeah, I'm old school and I'm used to learning from reference books, so I went out and purchased a few books that covered iOS, but there seemed to be a lot of assumptions about what I knew about Objective-c or developing with Xcode, so I've continued to hunt for a book whose style best matched mine.

I was very excited when I found this book. I spent some time evaluating this book's contents before I purchased it. I was very impressed by the opening chapter's excellent explanations of what appears to be every part of the Xcode UI and it seemed like the apps developed in each subsequent chapter would help me wrap my brain around Objective-c. The inclusion of a DVD of code and videos seemed to be icing on the cake.

Everything went very smoothly until I hit Lesson 4. This Lesson's code in the book is non-functional in ANY version of Xcode. The code on the DVD doesn't match what is in the book and is even missing content promised in the book. While there is updated DVD content freely available on the Wrox website this does not begin to address the simple fact that Wrox has published a book with very broken content. I can perhaps understand a few mistakes here and there, but it is painfully clear that the author of the words in this book (I assume it is Gene Backlin) and the developer of the content of each Lesson's App (The source files credit Abhishek Mishra) did not work very closely.

However, I believe that the most critical comments have been earned by the Technical Editor Allan Evans, who I assume would be responsible for signing off on the accuracy and quality of the draft words and DVD content prior to committing to printing. Mr. Evans clearly didn't do his job and this means that the thousands of trusting Wrox readers who spent a few bucks on this book are ending up being robbed of the opportunity to truly and accurately learn iPhone and iPad app development. It isn't the money loss that bothers me the most, it is the waste of my time invested in earnestly trying to get up to speed on this fantastic technology, only to end up betrayed by a publisher more interested in rushing a publication to print than truly serving its audience by postponing for the few weeks it takes to get it right.

We see repeated examples of where Apple postponed the shipping of products, not because there was a lack of demand from the public, but that the public deserved Apple's best, which sometimes took longer than expected. Why haven't the people at Wrox learned this lesson? My trust in this publisher is forever harmed because it is clear they don't respect me or my time and effort. The amazing thing is that I would so happily pay even double the price for this book if its lesson contents were as comprehensive and accurate as its initial coverage is of the Xcode IDE itself.

This is a fundamentally broken book that does more harm than good. The errata content on the Wrox website is a shockingly half-hearted effort to address and discuss this book's problems. While it does have to be said that Gene Backlin did respond very quickly to my two postings in the Wrox discussion forum for the book, it is clear that no serious, comprehensive or sincere effort has been made by anyone involved with this book to address the vast gulf between what the book promises to be working lessons and what exists in the downloadable sample files. Given the other comments on the Wrox website I am clearly not the first person to encounter this shortcoming in this book, yet nobody at Wrox seems to care enough to either comprehensively fix the contents of this book in the errata or to pull the book from the shelves completely (which is what I think a company with integrity and respect for its audience would do).

I've continued in my work in this book, hoping that Lesson 4 was an anomaly, but Lesson 5 was also missing content and yesterday I 'finished' Lesson 6 only to experience it functioning in a very unexpected manner. When I began to compare the contents of the files that the book had guided me to create against what I downloaded as the Lesson sample files, there were many commands that were simply not in the book. (Such as the directive: #pragma mark - View lifecycle in the Lesson6ViewController.m file)

I'm now at the point where I can probably continue to fight through and learn what I think I should be learning, but one doesn't know what one doesn't know - and this book isn't telling! I'd love to have written a glowing review and recommendation of this book, but it is so fundamentally flawed that I can only warn you away from wasting your time, effort and money on this sad waste of paper. The saddest fact is that I'm now back to hunting for a replacement for a book that really should have been sufficient in teaching me iOS programming across its 38 lessons.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great book for a novice programmer Dec 13 2012
By Ryan A. Flahive - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I bought this book and was amazed at how quickly I was able to start building apps. The active-learning design of the book immediately got me into Xcode and helped me build confidence and add new skills quickly. The learning modules are bite-sized, making it easy to learn something new in a 5-minute window or an hour-long window, whatever I had available. Since I started without any real coding experience, the easy-to-follow step-by-step directions were perfect for me. The accompanying videos made it easy to check my work and troubleshoot.

I'm thankful that I found this book as it has already allowed me to design and build my first app.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Excellent for classroom teaching Dec 2 2012
By Nameless Reviewer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I needed a book for classroom teaching in a corporate environment.
I looked through all of the general iOS app dev books.
The best books for this purpose contain short modules with clear explanations and numbered indented steps for the actual walkthough (so it is easy to follow and students do not get lost if they get distracted).
There are other great books but the steps are buried in otherwise excellent explanations and in a classroom this format is hard to follow.
This book matched the format I was looking for perfectly.

However, my audience consisted of experienced Java/C# programmers so I was afraid it was too basic for them.
But when I looked through the explanations, they were written in an amazing way.
They were not too difficult for beginners and yet, Java/C# programmers would not fall asleep because they could see how Objective C implements classes, MVC, event handling etc

I also loved the content of the walkthroughs because I am a bit tired of programming books with unimaginative examples and pathetic images. For example, in this book to illustrate how classes are created in Objective C, the authors create a Planet class. I thought it was nice, compared to many other programming books... Loved the nice images in the custom pickers chapter... And the storyboard chapter... Just get the book to see what I mean.

If I had the time to write books, I would write something similar to this book...
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Killer Book! Nov. 9 2012
By Millie Scharton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Mishra and Backlin's book iPhone and iPad App 24-hour Trainer is a "Killer Book", as it's by far the best of three books that I've purchased to try and learn how to write an app to help myself and others with a medical problem. (I'm a semi-retired aerospace engineer who has been using Apple computers for 35 years, but I have little or no programming experience.) The thing that make this book great is that at the end of each of the 38 chapters, it has a "Try it" example, where you build and run an actual app. Further, the book comes with a CD, which contains videos that go over each of these examples again, so that you can see exactly how they go together. Finally, you can download all the code for the examples from the Amazon web site. And, if this isn't enough, the appendices to the book have great bonus material on "An Introduction to Programming with Objective-C" (some knowledge of which is absolutely essential for developing apps), and helpful material on testing and distributing your app. However, I do question the book's subtitle "24-hour Trainer", as I've been working on this for several weeks now. Of course, I'm no "spring chicken."

As you can see, I'm sold on this book, and I'm writing this review because I feel indebted to the authors. Finally, I should add that I'm Terry (bio at scharton.com), and not Millie, who is my wife and the one with the Amazon account.


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