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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Now My Love?
Doing a book review on CS Lewis' "The Four Loves" brings forth an entire new meaning on 'a writer's block'. To expound this extraordinary Lewis' work on the four New Testament Greek "love" words - storge (natural affection), philia (friendship, love), eros (attraction, sexual love), and agape (love, charity) - amounts to nothing more than a leaky version of the Cliff...
Published on May 22 2004 by Gussie Fink-Nottle

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1 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pretentious to the core
If writing is a form of communication, C.S. Lewis must be talking gibberish. I think this book was not intended to simplify the meaning of love but to add complexity to it. Lewis' writing is so pretentious that you could hardly understand 'what...' he is talking about. Since this book is quite old, if your looking for a book to help you understand love, this book is not...
Published on March 1 2002 by M. S. Luis


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Now My Love?, May 22 2004
By 
This review is from: The Four Loves (Hardcover)
Doing a book review on CS Lewis' "The Four Loves" brings forth an entire new meaning on 'a writer's block'. To expound this extraordinary Lewis' work on the four New Testament Greek "love" words - storge (natural affection), philia (friendship, love), eros (attraction, sexual love), and agape (love, charity) - amounts to nothing more than a leaky version of the Cliff Notes at best. There are Lewis' scholars who could do far more justice to this work than I.
The long and short of "The Four Loves" is this. The three "loves" (storge, philia, and eros) are stemmed from agape (God's perfect love). Each is fractured and flawed since the Fall. Underlying all that we do, in both good and not so good, are these shades of loves. All are a fragment of and a divagation from the origin. The agape. Our forms of love have fallen short and are in need of mending. Only God's love mends.
If your affectionate other were to ask after a romantic candlelit dinner, "What now my love?" Don't sing. Lean forward and cup her hand, you segue to say, "Eros makes promises. Romance must die in marriage, and that marriage requires affection." Saying this may or may not take you to places you've never been - for the better or for the worst. Your look of love, however, could only change for the better. Thanks to Lewis.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars With Agape for All, March 13 2002
By 
Nicholas Robinson (Kennett, Missouri USA) - See all my reviews
I approached this writing with some prior experience and formal study of love. Consequently, I cannot judge with complete objectivity, how one might feel about The Four Loves if this was one of their first exposures to the concept. The book made perfect sense to me and was as captivating as any of Mr. Lewis's writings. While the book was not entirely ordered in the way that I would have liked, he adds his own concepts to the Greek notions of agape, storge, philos and eros. These additions help to explain the Greek notions to the modern reader and are at least as meaningful. They even suggest further ways in which to better understand that extremely nebulous word. He sees much farther in matters of loves than the typical modern writer. His knowledge of Renaissance and Medieval literature and history gives him a deep well of insights from which to draw and reveals how deficient the English language is in some basic areas of humanity despite having over 1/2 million words.
Lewis points us clearly in the direction of Christianity and the necessary selflessness it prescribes. Until we are truly selfless in attitude and not only in deed, we miss the Christian point of view.

I like the way he makes me think. This was my second Lewis book, after Screwtape, and it firmed my resolve to read more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For those who have felt that sense of longing in our hearts., Oct. 24 1995
By A Customer
Trust is fragile and does not come without an open heart.
C.S. Lewis' book on the four loves: affection (between a parent and a child), friendship, romantic love, and charity or love towards God is truly a remarkable piece of work.
Professor Lewis writes with an easiness rare amongst writers, speaks deliberately and with wisdom in his words.
He speaks of trust and of hearts, of humanity and humility. Truly, this is a moving book (or was for me) as well as a book which takes the seriousness of love rather lightly and playfully, for good reason. The seriousness and playfulness of love are but opposite sides of the same coin.
Read this book with an open, honest, yet vulnerable heart. One needs to take risks in the matters of the heart. And you shall experience the best of dark and bright.
--spaceboy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars With Agape for All, March 13 2002
By 
Nicholas Robinson (Kennett, Missouri USA) - See all my reviews
I approached this writing with some prior experience and formal study of love. Consequently, I cannot judge with complete objectivity, how one might feel about The Four Loves if this was one of their first exposures to the concept. The book made perfect sense to me and was as captivating as any of Mr. Lewis's writings. While the book was not entirely ordered in the way that I would have liked, he adds his own concepts to the Greek notions of agape, storge, philos and eros. These additions help to explain the Greek notions to the modern reader and are at least as meaningful. They even suggest further ways in which to better understand that extremely nebulous word. He sees much farther in matters of loves than the typical modern writer. His knowledge of Renaissance and Medieval literature and history gives him a deep well of insights from which to draw and reveals how deficient the English language is in some basic areas of humanity despite having over 1/2 million words.
As Lincoln said, "With malice toward none, with charity for all," Lewis points us clearly in the direction of Christianity and the necessary selflessness it prescribes. Until we are truly selfless in attitude and not only in deed, we miss the Christian point of view.

I like the way he makes me think. This was my second Lewis book, after Screwtape, and it firmed my resolve to read more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What IS Love?, July 20 2000
This review is from: The Four Loves (Hardcover)
I wish I could thank C.S. Lewis for writing this book! Not only was it a joy to read, but it has helped change my life as a person and as a Christian. Those who are not Christians would even enjoy this book! His analysis of the different types of love from an academic and a theological viewpoint is very gentle to the soul and easy on the mind. I didn't expect it, but reading this book caused me to examine the types of love in my life, both in giving and receiving, and after doing so, lessened so much of the heartache I had before reading its pages.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who wonders what love is, or if love is even worth having.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, Nov. 10 2006
By 
Steven R. McEvoy "MCWPP" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Four Loves ~ Ppr (Paperback)
I have now read this book three times - twice for school courses and once for personal reading. With each reading I find that a deeper understanding of the subject is obtained. This book is a great examination of the human heart, the different types of loves and how they each interact. Lewis examines: Affection, Friendship, Eros, and Charity. In each of the first three categories he shows both good and bad examples of that form of love, or in other words, the love and the perversion of that love.

Lewis states: "Let us make no mistakes. Our Gift-loves are really God-Like, and among our Gift-loves those are most God-Like which are most boundless and unwearied in giving. All the things the poets say about them are true. Their joy, their energy, their patience, their readiness to forgive, their desire for the good of the beloved - all this is a real and all but adorable image of the Divine life." p.9 This is the ultimate in love; this is when our love comes closest to God's Love.

Lewis gives us a great study in love, what love is, what it means to truly love and some of the pitfalls of love gone askew. This book will help you live and love better.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, Nov. 10 2006
By 
Steven R. McEvoy "MCWPP" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Four Loves (Paperback)
I have now read this book three times - twice for school courses and once for personal reading. With each reading I find that a deeper understanding of the subject is obtained. This book is a great examination of the human heart, the different types of loves and how they each interact. Lewis examines: Affection, Friendship, Eros, and Charity. In each of the first three categories he shows both good and bad examples of that form of love, or in other words, the love and the perversion of that love.

Lewis states: "Let us make no mistakes. Our Gift-loves are really God-Like, and among our Gift-loves those are most God-Like which are most boundless and unwearied in giving. All the things the poets say about them are true. Their joy, their energy, their patience, their readiness to forgive, their desire for the good of the beloved - all this is a real and all but adorable image of the Divine life." p.9 This is the ultimate in love; this is when our love comes closest to God's Love.

Lewis gives us a great study in love, what love is, what it means to truly love and some of the pitfalls of love gone askew. This book will help you live and love better.
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4.0 out of 5 stars the more you put into it..., Jan. 8 2004
By 
R. A. Davis (WV / DC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Four Loves (Hardcover)
As other reviewers have stated, C.S. Lewis takes a look at the four Greek words for love (storge, affection; philia, friendship; eros, romantic love; agape, charity). In addition, he defines some terms such as "Gift-Love", "Need-Love", "Appriciation-Love" and uses these in describing various attributes and potentialities of the Four Loves.
Lewis winds these terms and some other ideas throughout his writing and builds upon his ideas in his definitions of the various loves. I felt like I needed to totally comprehend each section before moving on, and while his ideas are not enormously complicated, they do require time and a hungry frame of mind to get the most out of the reading. It definitely would have helped me to take notes.
Lewis also used a lot of literary illustrations with the reasoning of the literature being more of a common ground with the reader than his personal experience; unfortunately, the literary cannon seems to have changed a bit - I don't know too many other people who have read Ovid or Tristram Shandy and can remember them well enough for these illustrations to make a whole lot of sense. The ideas being illustrated are still communicated well enough without the illustration, but several times I had to read the same passage more than once to get it to click. His other books I have read (Great Divorce, Mere Christianity, Screwtape) were easier, but this one is definitely rewarding.
My favorite section was Charity (agape) at the end of the book, which provided a beautiful description of God's Love and how it should basically light all the other loves on fire. Lewis sees Christianity as a light by which he understands, and he advances some enjoyably comforting, convicting, and profound ideas in this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Four Loves, by CS Lewis, Jan. 20 1997
By A Customer
C.S. Lewis has made a priceless analysis of love. My experience of reading his book "The Four Loves" (friendship, affection, eros and charity) and comparing it with other books on the subject, is that Lewis uses a fresh (to me) approach. It is like looking through a beautiful diamond. I have observed the diamond several times before, through people like Gerald May, Donald Goergen etc, but have not looked through that particular face of the diamond's prism that Lewis shows.

I liked "friendship" where the love of a particular subject can bring two or more people together in a love. I thoroughly enjoyed "Eros". Lewis calls that "love" that is purely genital sex, and the love that leads up to this, "Venus". He says that Venus is part of Eros. "We must not be totally serious about Venus, and if we are serious about her we can do harm to our humanity". And "Venus is a mocking, mischievous spirit, far more elf than deity, and makes game of us. When all external circumstances are the fittest for her service she will leave one or both lovers totally indisposed for it. When every overt act is impossible and even glances cannot be exchanged - in trains, in shops and at interminable parties - she will assail them with all her force. An hour later, when time and place agree, she will have mysteriously disappeared, perhaps from only one of them. ......

"In Eros at times we seem to be flying; Venus gives us the sudden twitch that reminds us we are really captive balloons ..... on one side akin to the angels, and on the other to tom cats. .... St. Francis called his body 'brother ass'..... It is impossible for anyone in his right senses to either revere or hate a donkey. An ass is a useful, sturdy, lazy, obstinate, patient, loveable and infuriating beast; deserving now the stick and now a carrot; both pathetically and absurdly beautiful. So the body. .... The fact that we have bodies is the oldest joke there is".

Lewis goes on to emphasise that none of the "natural" loves can survive without agape love, that is the love that comes from God, which Lewis calls "Charity".
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5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning, March 11 1998
By A Customer
This has to be one of the most thought-provoking books that has ever been written. Absolutely breathtaking! Using the logic Lewis is so famous for and written with the same intelligence as "Mere Christianity", this book is not to be discounted simply because it is about love. Lewis is regarded as one the best Christian theologians of modern times, and it is no mistake that he wrote about this subject, the different types of love, and the importance of it.
I went on a spiritaul search for true love--the love of God--at the same time I read this book. "The Four Loves" made everything about love that is cloudy much more clear. From Lewis, you can't get an better than this!
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Four Loves
Four Loves by C S Lewis (Paperback - Aug. 27 1998)
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