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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A sex crazed utopia
I read this book in university and it was one of my favorites. It is such a warped look a utopian society but it is everything we want....isn't it. Casual sex is the norm and the introduction of soma, a drug with no side effects makes the future and adults playground. There is no families, babies are not born, but decanted test tubes. People are born into a specific...
Published on Sept. 25 2009 by Amy Sinclair

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Discussion provoking, even if I didn't like it that much...
I didn't really like this book. I didn't care about any of the characters (in fact I hated all of them.) However, the book does challenge you to think about this vision of the future and I had many long discussions about *why* I didn't like the book and what I disagreed about, so even if I didn't like it, it was entertaining, which merits it three stars.
My biggest...
Published on Sept. 2 2004


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A sex crazed utopia, Sept. 25 2009
By 
Amy Sinclair (seattle WA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
I read this book in university and it was one of my favorites. It is such a warped look a utopian society but it is everything we want....isn't it. Casual sex is the norm and the introduction of soma, a drug with no side effects makes the future and adults playground. There is no families, babies are not born, but decanted test tubes. People are born into a specific class, and intellegence is altered. I don't want to give too much away, but I'll just say that I highly recomend reading it if you like dystopic fiction or sience fiction.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Such a Profound Read, Nov. 28 2007
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
Aldous Huxley's classic book, "Brave New World," is very interesting and such a profound read. This book should be strongly recommended.

In a way, this book is prophetic. While it is considered a science fiction, it remarkably parallel to that of today's world. Projecting suggestions through our sleeps are one of modes of mind control.

Today, we are all been subject constantly to 'suggestions' to one form or another, including a controlled media. And, we are ignoring the madness and believing in the lies brought forth by our so-called 'leaders' through the media. They can even seep the 'suggestions' through education, through televisions, through strobe lights, and through any media of sorts. And, we do not have a strong psychological resistance to these suggestions.

There is very important quote from this book that speaks of mind control:

"Till at last the child's mind is these suggestions and the sum of the suggestions is the child's mind. And not the child's mind only. The adult's mind too - all his life long. The mind that judges and desires and decides is made up of these suggestions. But these suggestions are our suggestions...suggestions from the State."

Brave New World is similar to George Orwell's "1984" in term of bureaucratized society where one lost self-identity and under a complete control of the state. Both "1984" and Brave New World do indeed had an impact on me as well anyone else in reading them.

Huxley's book is strongly recommended and receive more than five stars because it holds the real warning...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FIGHT THE POWER!, May 11 2005
With its vivid description of everyday activities such as the "feelie" movies and classification of every human into one of five letter and color groups, Huxley's Brave New World is a fun read for young adults and teens.
The Brave New World is a sort of Utopia, where humans are not born to mothers; they are bred in bottles and slowly travel by way of a huge conveyor belt through various machines during the gestational period. Those babies who will become astronauts spend a majority of time upside-down in the bottles, and those who will work in the jungles are submitted to a higher than normal temperature throughout the process. The embryos which are destined to be in one of the lower classes (Epsilons or Deltas) are purposefully deprived of oxygen so that they will not be "born" too intelligent for their class. In light of the current progressions that we have made with cloning and genetic alteration, it seems that Huxley has shown us one distinctly possible direction that society could wind up taking...
The book begins with a tour through the "decanting" factory.. recently fertilized eggs are artificially multiplied in the "Bokanovsky Process", which can create almost 100 identical embryos from a single egg. The lower classes will be multiplied to the highest degree, while the Alphas (the upper administrative class) will be individuals. The tour continues up to the nurseries where the children are conditioned every day to enjoy their lot in life. Some of this conditioning is done through aversion therapy, while some of it is drilled into the childrens' heads while they sleep. This sort of conditioning is what leads to a perfectly controlled world. (The controlled drug called Soma which is distributed faithfully to the masses doesn't hurt, either).
It is easy to determine which caste one person is in by the color they are wearing; each class wears a different color. The classes range from Alpha (highest) down to Beta, Gamma, Delta, and finally Epsilon. Deltas, for example, wear only khaki and are conditioned to hate books so that they will not waste their time reading. Betas, by contrast, are conditioned to be glad they're smart, but not as smart as Alphas because Alphas work too hard.
The older folks are so ingrained with these thoughts that they know nothing but happiness with their lives, regardless of whether they are the hard labor force or in one of the upper classes. However, the people in charge, as a result of knowing what is actually going on, can become a little bit jaded. When one "Alpha" decides to take a holiday, he sneaks off to a reservation of "savages" (folks who don't want any part of the Brave New World's society) and sees his illegitimate son. This is soon discovered, and he is brought forth before a committee which is shocked because they consider natural birth to be downright barbaric. The mother and son are brought into the "civilized" society, and everything quickly falls apart.
This book is fascinating in every way, from the colorful images that Huxley paints for the reader, to the parallels it draws to our current society. Brave New World is absolutely a must-read for anyone who is old enough to understand the implications, but try it for yourself! Pick up a copy! Another book I need to recommend -- completely unrelated to the science fiction, but very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, a fun, highly entertaining little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here it is!, March 23 2006
I like books that show the corruption of society: You know the ones I’m talking about—“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” or McCrae’s “Katzenjammer” which exposes corporate greed and New York City’s strageness. So I gravitated naturally to “Brave New World.” A sex-crazed world who thinks it's animal-like to have children naturally. I love the idea of a class system from the super-human double alpha plus to the grovelling Epsilon-Minus. And Soma, "a gramme is better than a damn." The freaky part about that drug is that something very similar to that now. And it doesn't make you happy, but sort of clueless, like an infant curious about the world. My favourite quote is from Benard Marx, as he refers to the way men talk about women, "As if they were a piece of meat."---showing just how bad society has gotten---and it has. And this is why I like Brave New World, even more so than 1984. Whereas Orwell warns of a totalitaranism based on perpetual war causing the poverty of a ration economy at home, Huxley examines a social control built on plenty or an illusion of plenty. One might then say that the works of these two men are opposite sides of the same coin in that Orwell's work is a warning against communist totalitarianism and Huxley's work warns us of a capitalist variant that is just as dangerous and certainly more relevant, at least to our own society.
Must also recommend: Jackson T. McCrae’s “Katzenjammer” which is VERY well-written, funny, disturbing, and informative.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Masterpiece of Satire and So-called Utopia!, June 2 2006
By 
John Blair "John Blair" (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It's difficult to believe that Aldous Huxley penned this book at some point prior to its publication year of 1932, because so many issues raised in Brave New World are hot-button topics today (genetic engineering, sex and relationships, individual versus society and so on). Although the reading may seem laborious to some, by the time John the Savage enters the fray surely anyone who enjoys literature will be fascinated by the juxtaposition of two quite different societies, and the hilarious satire that results -- sometimes subtle, other times quite overt! If you haven't read this one yet, please do so. Sometimes it's a bit challenging, but well worth the effort in the end.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I WANT TO BE ME..., Jan. 3 2011
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
It is hard to believe that this sci-fi classic was written nearly 80 years ago. It world depicted within the pages of this book resembles the world we know today rather than the world of the nineteen thirties, when this book was written.

It is a world in which women are sexually liberated and are not looked at askance for having multiple sexual relationships. People are programmed at birth to be satisfied with the status quo. One's future is predetermined. Most are satisfied and, of course, there is soma, an addictive substance that induces euphoria.

There are a few renegades, however, who are not satisfied, for whom the pre-programming just did not take. These free thinkers have questions that they want answered. They are individualistic in a world where the individual is sublimated to the grand scheme of things that is firmly in place. They simply do not feel that they belong in such a world. They will soon find out what happens to those who do not conform.

This is a book that provides a great deal of food for thought, which is why it has remained a classic in its genre. Provocative and prophetic, it is a book that will never cease to amaze, as the story is simplicity itself, but the themes are quite complex.
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5.0 out of 5 stars God does not change. But people do., March 10 2008
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
We are treated to a glimpse of a possible future world where friendship can still exist. This is a story of a hand full of individuals in a world that emphasizes "Community, Identity, Stability" that find each other and discus subjects that most of the people of that time cold not understand. However we do. Naturally the author Aldous Huxley builds his own scenarios and draws his own conclusions through the characters speeches and description of experimental history.

Bernard Marx who is about to lose his job because he is different (vary different) form those around him, decides to take a vacation to visit the Zuni's. There he meets a misplaced person named John. Together with the help of Bernard's friend Henry they intend to change the world. So they find out the world is incapable of changing.

We get an Ayn Rand type speech from Mustapha Mond one of the world controllers' that helps you realize that in this brave new world the three friends are the anomaly. How can this enigma be solved?

Do not forget to watch the 1998 movie version with Leonard Nimoy as Mustapha Mond.
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5.0 out of 5 stars God does not change. But people do., Nov. 9 2007
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
We are treated to a glimpse of a possible future world where friendship can still exist. This is a story of a hand full of individuals in a world that emphasizes "Community, Identity, Stability" that find each other and discus subjects that most of the people of that time cold not understand. However we do. Naturally the author Aldous Huxley builds his own scenarios and draws his own conclusions through the characters speeches and description of experimental history.

Bernard Marx who is about to lose his job because he is different (vary different) form those around him, decides to take a vacation to visit the Zuni's. There he meets a misplaced person named John. Together with the help of Bernard's friend Henry they intend to change the world. So they find out the world is incapable of changing.

We get an Ayn Rand type speech from Mustapha Mond one of the world controllers' that helps you realize that in this brave new world the three friends are the anomaly. How can this enigma be solved?
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5.0 out of 5 stars FIGHT THE POWER!, July 22 2005
With its vivid description of everyday activities such as the "feelie" movies and classification of every human into one of five letter and color groups, Huxley's Brave New World is a fun read for young adults and teens.
The Brave New World is a sort of Utopia, where humans are not born to mothers; they are bred in bottles and slowly travel by way of a huge conveyor belt through various machines during the gestational period. Those babies who will become astronauts spend a majority of time upside-down in the bottles, and those who will work in the jungles are submitted to a higher than normal temperature throughout the process. The embryos which are destined to be in one of the lower classes (Epsilons or Deltas) are purposefully deprived of oxygen so that they will not be "born" too intelligent for their class. In light of the current progressions that we have made with cloning and genetic alteration, it seems that Huxley has shown us one distinctly possible direction that society could wind up taking...
The book begins with a tour through the "decanting" factory.. recently fertilized eggs are artificially multiplied in the "Bokanovsky Process", which can create almost 100 identical embryos from a single egg. The lower classes will be multiplied to the highest degree, while the Alphas (the upper administrative class) will be individuals. The tour continues up to the nurseries where the children are conditioned every day to enjoy their lot in life. Some of this conditioning is done through aversion therapy, while some of it is drilled into the childrens' heads while they sleep. This sort of conditioning is what leads to a perfectly controlled world. (The controlled drug called Soma which is distributed faithfully to the masses doesn't hurt, either).
It is easy to determine which caste one person is in by the color they are wearing; each class wears a different color. The classes range from Alpha (highest) down to Beta, Gamma, Delta, and finally Epsilon. Deltas, for example, wear only khaki and are conditioned to hate books so that they will not waste their time reading. Betas, by contrast, are conditioned to be glad they're smart, but not as smart as Alphas because Alphas work too hard.
The older folks are so ingrained with these thoughts that they know nothing but happiness with their lives, regardless of whether they are the hard labor force or in one of the upper classes. However, the people in charge, as a result of knowing what is actually going on, can become a little bit jaded. When one "Alpha" decides to take a holiday, he sneaks off to a reservation of "savages" (folks who don't want any part of the Brave New World's society) and sees his illegitimate son. This is soon discovered, and he is brought forth before a committee which is shocked because they consider natural birth to be downright barbaric. The mother and son are brought into the "civilized" society, and everything quickly falls apart.
This book is fascinating in every way, from the colorful images that Huxley paints for the reader, to the parallels it draws to our current society. Brave New World is absolutely a must-read for anyone who is old enough to understand the implications, but try it for yourself! Pick up a copy! Another book I need to recommend -- completely unrelated to the science fiction, but very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, a fun, highly entertaining little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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5.0 out of 5 stars FIGHT THE POWER!, July 11 2005
With its vivid description of everyday activities such as the "feelie" movies and classification of every human into one of five letter and color groups, Huxley's Brave New World is a fun read for young adults and teens.
The Brave New World is a sort of Utopia, where humans are not born to mothers; they are bred in bottles and slowly travel by way of a huge conveyor belt through various machines during the gestational period. Those babies who will become astronauts spend a majority of time upside-down in the bottles, and those who will work in the jungles are submitted to a higher than normal temperature throughout the process. The embryos which are destined to be in one of the lower classes (Epsilons or Deltas) are purposefully deprived of oxygen so that they will not be "born" too intelligent for their class. In light of the current progressions that we have made with cloning and genetic alteration, it seems that Huxley has shown us one distinctly possible direction that society could wind up taking...
The book begins with a tour through the "decanting" factory.. recently fertilized eggs are artificially multiplied in the "Bokanovsky Process", which can create almost 100 identical embryos from a single egg. The lower classes will be multiplied to the highest degree, while the Alphas (the upper administrative class) will be individuals. The tour continues up to the nurseries where the children are conditioned every day to enjoy their lot in life. Some of this conditioning is done through aversion therapy, while some of it is drilled into the childrens' heads while they sleep. This sort of conditioning is what leads to a perfectly controlled world. (The controlled drug called Soma which is distributed faithfully to the masses doesn't hurt, either).
It is easy to determine which caste one person is in by the color they are wearing; each class wears a different color. The classes range from Alpha (highest) down to Beta, Gamma, Delta, and finally Epsilon. Deltas, for example, wear only khaki and are conditioned to hate books so that they will not waste their time reading. Betas, by contrast, are conditioned to be glad they're smart, but not as smart as Alphas because Alphas work too hard.
The older folks are so ingrained with these thoughts that they know nothing but happiness with their lives, regardless of whether they are the hard labor force or in one of the upper classes. However, the people in charge, as a result of knowing what is actually going on, can become a little bit jaded. When one "Alpha" decides to take a holiday, he sneaks off to a reservation of "savages" (folks who don't want any part of the Brave New World's society) and sees his illegitimate son. This is soon discovered, and he is brought forth before a committee which is shocked because they consider natural birth to be downright barbaric. The mother and son are brought into the "civilized" society, and everything quickly falls apart.
This book is fascinating in every way, from the colorful images that Huxley paints for the reader, to the parallels it draws to our current society. Brave New World is absolutely a must-read for anyone who is old enough to understand the implications, but try it for yourself! Pick up a copy! Another book I need to recommend -- completely unrelated to the science fiction, but very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, a fun, highly entertaining little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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Brave New World B Format
Brave New World B Format by Aldous Huxley (Paperback - Jan. 10 1994)
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