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Showing 1-10 of 24 reviews(1 star). Show all reviews
on November 26, 1998
I was so enthusiastic and worked up to expecting a splendid and original read, but came off greatly dissapointed and got frustrated trying to think of what all the hype was about with BRAVE NEW WORLD. I tried so very hard to like and enjoy reading this...but my mind just didn't want to cooperate. Such a complex and creepy look into a superfical world into this book was hard to grasp, this just wasn't the type of book I expected. I prefered 1984 and Animal Farm much more than Brave New World. I mean, it's hard to say that emotions can errupture with just a little pill, and vice versa. Oh well, maybe I'm a bit tuff to give such a beloved classic just 1 star, but that's what I deeply and truely think this book deserves. I'll stick to my old favorites: Eliot, Hardy, Orwell, Willa Cather, Wharton, Dreiser, and Gustave Flaubert. Hehe, I never get to tired of my favorites. Viz., I didn't like this classic.
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on January 15, 2014
Brave New World entered Canadian Public Domain on January 1, 2014. This publication has numerous errors in spelling, punctuation, layout and more. While the price is reasonable for a public domain work, I might suggest a better publisher.

Book 5/5 stars; this sloppy publication, 1/5 stars.
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on May 29, 1999
This science fiction novel seemed to lack the credibility of many other sci-fi books around now. Huxley's incredibly boring and unrelatable characters gave me the urge to yell "STOP WHINGING!"
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on March 11, 2004
The Great Idea that spawned this book is visionary and intelligent and hampered by Aldous Huxleys' ant-American ideals.I found that the first few chapters of the book consisted of the author trying(successfully though boringly)to persuade us of the world he was creating and at the same time trying (and failing dismally) to include storyline and character developement.The author was evidently an intelligent man with great ideas but I,personally, want more than that from my reads.Huxley was influenced by Ant-American friends and two 'trips'(not holidays) to America to confirm his suspicians about the 'New Power' taking the rest of us down the slippery slope of classless mass production.I say that AH was an intellectual,creatively barren,snob who cared more about maintaining his sheltered middle-class England and not about the lower classes.He also tried and failed to make it in Hollywood,the critics now say that he was 'too intelligent' for hollywood but,after reading BNW,I suspect he just wasn't creative enough-for all his great ideas and I suspect the resentment from being judged wanting by such a faction is a main reason for his political bent.
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on May 19, 2002
The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is about an English utopian society in the future. The main characters are one of 96 clones just like themselves, and the novel guides the reader through their everyday lives. Huxley introduces some interesting concepts and ideas, but the text lacks flavor.
The tiresome novel slowly drags on discussing the differences between their culture and that of today. There is no distinct storyline to engulf the reader's desire turn the pages, and it has a dry personality. Huxley declines to develop his characters and they lack a certain realistic dimension.
There isn't an identifiable incline, climax or decline of the novel. Turning the pages is like drudging through a marshy swamp. Its dull continuation of information isn't intriguing, however the thought that this type of society may someday consume our world does open up the reader's mind to a shocking truth.
The novel is well written, but isn't recommended for people under the age of fifteen due to many adult topics and concepts within. It is directed toward people interested in expanding their imagination about possible future societies, but doesn't have the action and suspense to keep the pages turning, so don't be disappointed.
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on May 19, 2002
The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is about an English utopian society in the future. The main characters are one of 96 clones just like themselves, and the novel guides the reader through their everyday lives. Huxley introduces some interesting concepts and ideas, but the text lacks flavor.
The tiresome novel slowly drags on discussing the differences between their culture and that of today. There is no distinct storyline to engulf the reader's desire turn the pages, and it has a dry personality. Huxley declines to develop his characters and they lack a certain realistic dimension.
There isn't an identifiable incline, climax or decline of the novel. Turning the pages is like drudging through a marshy swamp. Its dull continuation of information isn't intriguing, however the thought that this type of society may someday consume our world does open up the reader's mind to a shocking truth.
The novel is well written, but isn't recommended for people under the age of fifteen due to many adult topics and concepts within. It is directed toward people interested in expanding their imagination about possible future societies, but doesn't have the action and suspense to keep the pages turning, so don't be disappointed.
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on June 26, 2000
What puzzles me is why this book is so frequently quoted, like it is some kind of literary pearl. After having read it, I gotta say it feels like if Ayn Rand decided to re-make Candide. Which is to say it definitely isn't great literature. This plotless, uneven book is populated by drowning in bathos stick-figure characters that take their turns at barking out the author's rant. Maybe if it had been an essay, it would have been less unbearable, but as a novel the book is pathetic. As far as Huxley's being prophetic, well, first that adds nothing to its literary value, second, this is trivial, and lastly, Hillaire Belloc with his "Servile State" was ahead of Huxley by about twenty years (and he, appropriately made it an essay, not a half-a##ed novel brimming over with witticisms like "fordship" instead of "lordship". Phooey.)
Instead, I recommend to read Belloc's "Servile State" first, and then you will probably not want to bother with "Brave New World." The book's junk.
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on October 15, 1998
After reading "1984" twice, with great interest, I was enthusiastic about another wonderfully horrible anti-Utopian novel. But I was really disappointed with BNW, supposedly the fifth greatest modern novel. The science-talk was too bulky and lengthy and very little of it contributed to the story. The characters failed to capture my interest, leaving me totally apathetic toward them and their trials. Their catchphrases ("Oh, Ford!" and the many subconsciously-learned rhymes especially) were important to the characterizations but became very annoying after a while. At times the quality of the text dropped notably, well below anything I'd consider to be of any literary value. Often at these points the characters, events, and time periods involved became very difficult to discern. The plot was interesting but stretched to its absolute limits, laboriously squeezing every last drop out of the concept. Since this is required reading for high school seniors, I had no choice. Had free will been involved, I would have put this away after the first twenty-five pages or so. I don't understand why this work is acclaimed at all, never mind so highly. But this is of course only my opinion... please don't send me any hate-mail.
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on March 9, 2016
Yuk! Very shallow.
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on March 21, 2000
This boos is so weak, the narrative is so boring, thecharacters are so ridiculous and awkward, that I can't understand whatpeople saw in it. There's no climax, the plot is old cliche in the "science-fiction" (even being written in 1926) and people get saying that the book is "prophetic", "visionnaire".. Come on! IT is just boring. The end is laughable, the character who theoretically fights the organized civilization is also a "robot", because he only says what he read in Shakespeare. Blá!
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