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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book
This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the...
Published on Sept. 11 2006 by Steven R. McEvoy

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good underlying themes on life, bad storyline
I admire C.S. Lewis for his writings on Christianity, but anyone trying to writing Christian sci-fi novels is stretching the line of interest (or at least mine). The plotline is horrible. Thank goodness this was a short book. I would have quit at about Chapter 7 if I wouldn't have had tests on it. No offense Clive but this is definitely not your best work. I am also not...
Published on Nov. 24 2001 by Bc


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book, Sept. 11 2006
By 
Steven R. McEvoy "MCWPP" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Out Of The Silent Planet (Paperback)
This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the countryside, dressed in that shabby way for which professors are renowned. His foes are his former schoolmates Devine and Weston. These men believe they need a human sacrifice, and by capturing Ransom they have their victim, for they have made a spaceship and are taking Ransom to Malacandra the red planet.

Once on Mars, Ransom escapes his captors, meets many species, and finds out that on Mars there has been no "fall" and Ransom from Earth or the Silent Planet is a bit of an oddity. People from earth are considered to be "bent" in nature, from the original sin of the fall.

Follow Ransom as he treks across a strange world, and must find the courage to risk it all to save not only an alien race, but also, possibly his own soul.

This is a first book in an amazing series. Try it - you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Series, Sept. 11 2006
By 
Steven R. McEvoy "MCWPP" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Out of the Silent Planet
C.S. Lewis

This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the countryside, dressed in that shabby way for which professors are renowned. His foes are his former schoolmates Devine and Weston. These men believe they need a human sacrifice, and by capturing Ransom they have their victim, for they have made a spaceship and are taking Ransom to Malacandra the red planet.

Once on Mars, Ransom escapes his captors, meets many species, and finds out that on Mars there has been no "fall" and Ransom from Earth or the Silent Planet is a bit of an oddity. People from earth are considered to be "bent" in nature, from the original sin of the fall.

Follow Ransom as he treks across a strange world, and must find the courage to risk it all to save not only an alien race, but also, possibly his own soul.

This is a first book in an amazing series. Try it - you won't be disappointed.

Perelandra
C.S. Lewis

This is the second book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. This book was written as a sequel to the immensely popular Out of the Silent Planet but Lewis also wrote it so that the story can stand on its own. So if you haven't read the first you can start here.

This book takes place some time after the first, but we are not sure how long. Ransom has received a summons to Venus, a planet that is just beginning its inhabited life. This planet's 'Adam' and 'Eve' are on the planet and they must choose to obey God or to reject his law and face a "fall" as has happened on earth.

Ransom must face his old foe Weston, and try to save a planet from great evil. Can he navigate this watery planet; can he negotiate the intricacies of human weakness, temptation and corruption? Can he conquer himself and help others to learn obedience?

This is a great creation story. Try it - you won't be disappointed.

That Hideous Strength
C.S. Lewis

This is the third and final book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. This book was written as a sequel to the immensely popular Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra but Lewis also wrote it so that the story can stand on its own. So if you haven't read the first, you can start here.

That Hideous Strength, unlike the first 2 books in this series, where Ransom leaves earth and fights evil in space and on other planets, the battle in this book takes place on earth.

Ransom must lead a group of faithful believers against National Institute for Coordinated Experiments or N.I.C.E., an organization that believes that Science can solve all of humanity's problems. He must battle the people in this organization, super aliens trying to invade and control earth and use its population against other planets and against God.

On top of all of that, Merlin has arisen from his long sleep and has arisen in England's time of greatest need. But the question is, who will find him first - N.I.C.E. or Ransom and his team? The fate of the world, and possibly the universe, rests on this question.

Lewis called this story an adult's fairy-tale. It is a mix of sci-fi and fantasy, and a book that will keep your attention as you raptly turn the pages to find out where Lewis will lead you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Good underlying themes on life, bad storyline, Nov. 24 2001
I admire C.S. Lewis for his writings on Christianity, but anyone trying to writing Christian sci-fi novels is stretching the line of interest (or at least mine). The plotline is horrible. Thank goodness this was a short book. I would have quit at about Chapter 7 if I wouldn't have had tests on it. No offense Clive but this is definitely not your best work. I am also not enthralled that I will have to read the other 2 books of the trilogy. If you're looking for a good one of Lewis' works, read "Screwtape Letters" or "Mere Christianity."
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5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, May 28 2002
By 
A. Miller (USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If one is likely to read and love C.S.Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia, one cannot help but be equally satisfied, and in some ways more, with this book and the other two in the Space Trilogy (Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength). This book is told about a Dr. Ransom who is taken captive by two aquaintances (Weston and Divine)on Earth and flown by spaceship to Malacandra. It is here where Ransom flees with fear of what may happen to him in his captive's hands and their motives. Along the way he meets the most intreaging of creatures on the planet who will both pull you in and take you away. Wonderfully described and portrayed, C.S.Lewis gives the reader a gift of traveling to a new world full of seroni, hrossa, etc. Allowing for readers with an open mind, to learn and ponder new thoughts and ideas. Ransom through his stay on the planet, learns to face his fears and become a better human being while respecting the differences in others who are unlike himself. The characters and story are unforgetable. I highly recomend this book, and I can assure you will not be hesitant to pick up the second when through.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Theology... in the world beyond!, April 13 2002
This is the great lay-theologian's foray into sci-fi, first published in 1938. I mention that date, because this book does not resemble much current "science fiction." It's definitely fiction... but not very scientific. For instance, Lewis avoids explaining any technical problems in how these characters actually leave Earth's atmosphere (or return). What is the source of propulsion? Nowadays, a 7-year-old reader would get bogged down in the first few pages, realizing that everyone would be burnt to a crisp in the homemade space-contraption Lewis blithely hurtles them off in.
That being said... the book is still a gem.
It begins with Dr. Elwin Ransom (a middle-aged Philologist from Cambridge University) being kidnapped by two men, Dick Devine and Dr. Weston, the latter being a mad physicist who wants to extend humanity to other planets. At first, Ransom is excited with this journey to Malacandra (Mars)... until he overhears that he is going to be offered as a sacrifice to the space-creatures called "sorns." Devine and Weston have been to Malacandra before, and have convinced themselves that a human sacrifice is recquired by the sorns, in return for the right to exploit the planet's gold deposits.
Upon arrival, Ransom escapes... beginning a conflict that lasts the length of the book and extends to its sequel "Perelandra."
In this colorful novel, Lewis explores many DEEP themes... the primary one being that, if there is life on another planet, there is no need for us to assume that it is in a "fallen" state, or filled with wickedness, or in need of redemption, as our own is. If we reached other planets we might find a race which was, like us, rational but, unlike us, innocent - having no wars nor any other wickedness among them. If this were so, we would have much to learn from such creatures, and have nothing to teach them. But, because of our own "bentness" we would probably find some reason for exterminating them.
This is what happens here in Out Of The Silent Planet.
Lewis was inspired to write this book after finding that many of his own students held to beliefs in interplanetary colonization and the scientific hope of defeating physical death. Out Of The Silent Planet is an attack on the belief that the supreme moral end of mankind is the perpetuation of our own species. The book is so rich in invention, so broad in scope, so sensuously perceptive in descriptive detail that, after reading it, it's difficult to view the Cosmos through any but Lewis' eyes. Seriously, after my first reading, I walked outside and looked up into the night sky and wondered... "What if?"
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pale jewel of thought, Jan. 28 2002
Its an allegory with a smidgen of sci-fi ("speculative" fiction), but Out of the Silent Planet is surprisingly a deftly written and enjoyable tale. Though it may be a Christian discourse, I found the themes of the "bentness" of human nature and the propensity for xenophobia to be more philosophical.
Some people may like to point out the implausibility of three intelligent co-existing species on one planet, or the flimsy science, but this book is so much more than mere cold hard science & logic, as was displayed through the character of Weston. The calculating physicist defends humanity's viral nature as only the result of the "survival of the fittest" and humans will take over Malacandra with our superior technology and war. Conversely, the Malacandrians take the "live and let die" attitude. They think the human fear of death, desire for limitless wealth, and abhorrence to monogamy to be pointless (hmm... must be Buddhists) which brings Ransom to the conclusion that perhaps we are the morally inferior species. That is why humans have come "out of the silent planet" as, unlike Malacandra, its moral ruler has fallen and has no voice in the heavens (space for the ahtiests, heh)
The diction was pretty smooth, not all the authoritarian British style I was expecting. The pace was suspenseful - easily done on a strange planet with unknown friends and terrors around ever corner. Out of the Silent Planet has suspense, a tightly woven plot, characters with real conflict - everything that makes a strong, compelling book. It only needs more! So, read the whole series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Battling between good and evil, Jan. 7 2002
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The theme throughout these three books is man's battle (or, rather, intelligent life's battle) between good and evil, with some very obvious, but not stifling, religious overtones also found in CS Lewis' nonfiction work. For adults who absolutely adored the Chronicles of Narnia set, this trilogy takes you through the battle between good and evil in a more sophisticated manner. Granted, these are not nearly as easy to read, but adapting to the more complex (sometimes slow-moving in Hideous Strength) writing style was quick.
If you are primarily interested in religious fiction, and have the patience to read books with more complexity than, say, the Left Behind series, you will like these allegorical journeys through the fall of man. If you are primarily interested in SciFi, CS Lewis takes you to other worlds (Silent Planet, Perelandra) and introduces beings from another Earth-time (Hideous Strength) with an original twist of the good vs. evil storyline.
All three books can be read on their own, however I found that "That Hideous Strength" would have been difficult to follow without the background provided in either "Out of the Silent Planet" or "Perelandra". Regardless of the individual readability of the 3 stories, I started with the 1st book (Out of the Silent Planet) not sure I would enjoy it, and ended up finishing all 3 within a week or two.
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5.0 out of 5 stars C.S. Lewis' Allegorical Fantasy Masterpiece..., Dec 26 2001
By 
Arthur F. McVarish (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The SPACE TRILOGY is C.S. Lewis' allegorical fantasy masterwork. It combines Christian Theology with philosophy, mythology and conventions of science fiction to produce one of the great Quest adventures of 20th century fiction.
OUT of the SILENT PLANET introduces Ransom.... Lewis' surrogate voice of traditional Reason tempered by Faith...who is kidnapped by contemporary forces of (literally) superstitous adherrence to Modern/Post-Modern radical secularism and Scientism. Taken to "Mars"((to be victim of blood sacrifice to Alien Intelligences)) Ransom is made aware of the consequences of ORIGINAL SIN that made Earth, THE SILENT PLANET; and battle ground for Cosmic Powers of Good and Evil.
PERELANDRA, in my estimate the most fascinating of the three books, is modern re-Telling of The GARDEN OF EDEN parable. Here Ransom and a character named Weston (believed by some scholars to represent H.G.Wells)become locked in spiritual, psychological and ultimately physical combat to preserve or corrupt an INNOCENT WORLD. C.S.Lewis description of "Venus"...the Edenic Planet...is startling and unique. The battle between the Two WORLD VIEWS is exciting and thought-provoking.
THAT HIDEOUS STRENGTH is scary...
In The Trilogy's conclusion, Lewis(again through his hero Ransom) posits the Forces of Modern/ Post-Modernism are an anti-Faith in league with Demonic Powers. This "Fairy Tale for Adults" imaginatively evokes the myth of the Tower of Babel combined with Arthurian Legends, and New Age Occultism to produce a story of...until the climax when demonic influences are overtly revealed...subtle horror. The N.I.C.E. is described as a scientific United Nations devoted to establishment of a utopian Order of World Peace and Prosperity. The startling climax reveals its leaders as Conspirators with Evil, trading the souls and Nature of Mankind for Power.
The SPACE TRILOGY is great story telling. Philosophically, C.S. Lewis dealt with many of its themes in his renowned essay,THE ABOLITION OF MAN. Like the latter,the premise of TST may unacceptably challenge or offend mature readers. What begins as Fairy Tale in guise of Science Fiction concludes as MODERN FABLE employing The Quest to probe ultimate metaphysical and ethical questions. Unlike The Chronicles of Narnia, THE SPACE TRILOGY is not for children.It is for adults who wish to travel Inner Spaces of the mind, heart and Soul and be marvelously entertained by The Trip......
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Fiction Fleshes Out Lewis' Philosophy, Nov. 23 2001
By 
Gordon Hackman "absent minded prof" (Buffalo Grove, IL) - See all my reviews
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One of the things that I really appreciate about C.S. Lewis is the way in which a great deal of his fictional writing seems to flesh out the ideas found in his non-fiction works. His stories are not just stories, but are often attempts to show how certain theological or philosophical positions might look in the world of everyday experience. His philosophy and theology are incarnated through his stories, so to speak. This offers the student of Lewis a chance to see how the ideas, theories, and beliefs promoted and discussed in his non-fiction works might play out in the "real" world. The works of the Space Trilogy parallel closely and deal with a lot of the same subject matter that is covered in Lewis' non-fiction work "The Abolition of Man", as well as many of his other, shorter writings, particularly on such subjects as science and technology, morality, and theology.
In "Out of the Silent Planet" we first meet the character Ransom, who is kidnapped and taken on an interplanetary journey to Mars where he begins to learn about the true nature of the universe and the place our world occupies in it. This is also where we meet the first of various characters who, throughout the Trilogy, represent false, pernicious, and morally bankrupt views of the nature of the universe, and, more importantly, do not want to know the truth. Throughout the Trilogy, the forces of truth and goodness, mostly embodied in Ransom and some of his companions, must attempt to thwart and defeat the wicked schemes of those who refuse to acknowledge or embrace the truth. The schemes become more horrific and the action more intense with each successive book. In "Perelandra" Ransom must attempt to thwart the enemy's plans for the young planet Venus, while "That Hideous Strength" turns it's attention to the battle here at home.
The writing in these books is at a very high level, full of beautiful description and deep theological and philosophical reflections about the nature of the universe we inhabit. Yet the stories themselves are also gripping, and are full of interesting and imaginative ideas of what things might be like on these other planets. In some ways, these books might almost be called anti-science fiction, because instead of using the story form simply to speculate about what scientific or technological advances might bring us in the future, Lewis attempts to show us how the inhabitants of these other planets would be real spiritual and moral beings, and to warn us about the possible consequences of allowing a morally and spiritually bankrupt scientific and technological elite to define our lives and our universe.
These books stand head and shoulders over most science fiction writing and are worthy of the title of classics.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best C.S. Lewis writing, Nov. 17 2001
By 
Paul H. Rich (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
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Many of Lewis' works are heavily Christian, but his Space Trilogy is only subtly so, and the arguments and theological constructs are applicable far beyond Christianity. The writing in these three books is not Narnia-like in its intended audience, nor in its depth. It is difficult reading at times but well worth it. Out of the Silent Planet is really a primer for the two later books and isn't nearly as deep, consisting more of plot and action than meaning. It sets up nicely the amazing Perelandra, full of symbolism and philosophical meanderings. The final book, That Hideous Strength, combines an odd cast of characters and strange plot twists, almost in Bradbury style, but somehow manages to fit together and arrive at a climax that is somewhat reminiscent of the great battle of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, but with a more sophisticated and less obvious symbolic overtone. I heartily recommend these three books to any C.S. Lewis fan, as well as to people that simply enjoy novel works of theology and philosophy.
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Out Of The Silent Planet
Out Of The Silent Planet by C S Lewis (Paperback - Dec 15 2005)
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