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292 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing deal!
Great price for a beautiful book I haven't seen it cheaper anywhere else! Lightweight and easy to hold and read!
Published 1 month ago by Angela

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Middle-Earth is in the middle with me
After reading this book, I found it lacking in a couple areas.
I mean, i need contant action or suspence. The first part of this book failed. I was about ready to stop reading until i got to Mordor with Frodo and Sam. Thats where the action is focks. Other than that, it has a good plot and good detail. I give it 3 out of 4 stars.
Published on April 22 2002 by azajdel NDP World Lit 2


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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing deal!, March 20 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Great price for a beautiful book I haven't seen it cheaper anywhere else! Lightweight and easy to hold and read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Genius Book Reviews - Novel Review, Dec 11 2013
Format: Paperback

Rating: 9

Review: The Two Towers was a fantastic continuation of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. The book broke off into different story lines, so the reader could get a full view of everything that was happening. This novel built onto the first book by having more action, and the ability to keep the reader intrigued throughout. Being the second book in the trilogy, The Two Towers succeeded in setting up the storyline for the finale, while also keeping the tale upbeat and interesting on it’s own. This impressed me, for most of the time the middle book in a trilogy is disappointing. In conclusion, I suggest this novel to those who have read the first book in the trilogy, enjoyed it, and are looking for more. I am hoping for great things in the final instalment of this series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars sweet book!!!!!!!!!!, July 21 2013
By 
Lynae Yankee - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
the book was a blast! The hobbits are funny,especially Samwise.It is a little violent but I still enjoyed it.Can't wait to buy the next book……!

Caleb yankee,10 years old
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5.0 out of 5 stars Last Things, Feb. 23 2013
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the third volume in J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy. It follows The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. Be sure to read both of them first.

In the final volume the two main story lines reach their common end. The hobbits Frodo and Sam have been slowly working their way toward the volcano deep in Mordor where the ring can be destroyed. The other main characters and their allies converge by diverse paths on the city Gondor, where they will stand without hope against Sauron's invading armies. No matter what the outcome, there will be some who will not see each other again.

This book is necessary if you have read the first two volumes. In fact, it would take tremendous will power not to read it to see how the story ends. A warning if this is your first time through the trilogy. After finishing this book many readers experience a lingering melancholy, a sense of loss for a time. This seems to be only partially due to the story's events. Having traveled, suffered, and grown with the characters, you may miss them. There isn't any easy way to dispel this feeling. In time it will fade.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Scattered Seeds of the Fellowship, Feb. 23 2013
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the second volume in J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy. It follows The Fellowship of the Ring and is followed by The Return of the King.

In this part of the story, the original fellowship of nine travelers is fragmented. Some seek Mordor and the forlorn hope of destroying the one ring in the volcanic fires that produced it. Others are taken captive, and pursued by would-be rescuers. As the travelers disperse, readers become acquainted with the lands and peoples of Middle Earth. We meet the independent horsemen of Rohan, the foul orcs of Mordor, the proud men of Gondor, and the shades of past oath-breakers, eager for redemption. The schemes of wizards, stewards and wraiths become more clear. The tension builds.

The middle book of the trilogy covers a lot of ground, both geographically and in character development. The characters gather their strength for war with the forces of evil. Tolkien gives his characters distinct strengths which complement the abilities of their companions. There is a growing sense that each will have a part to play in the coming conflict--a unique and indispensable part.

If you have already read volume one of the trilogy, you are going to read volume two. No choice, really.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Age Of Man Begins, Sept. 7 2012
By 
Dave_42 "Dave_42" (Australia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
As the last volume of the trilogy, the reader gets an end to the story, and in fact "The Return of the King" has several places where one could end, but for those who want to continue on past the end of Sauron, past the end of the War, etc., the story continues to the end of the Third Age. "The Return of the King" was originally published on October 20th of 1955. "The Lord of the Rings" was the last recipient of the International Fantasy Award for Fiction in 1957, it was also nominated for the Hugo for all-time series in 1966, and was nominated from 2002 through 2008 for the Prometheus Hall of Fame award, before winning it in 2009. As with the previous two volumes, this one contains two books.

Book V is titled "The War of the Ring" and it returns to the story of all those outside of the Ring Bearers. It starts with Gandalf and Pippin arriving at Minas Tirith to deliver the news to Denethor and takes us to the start of the battle in front of the Black Gate of Mordor. This book tells the story of a large number of characters. Only the ring-bearers are absent as characters, though they are certainly in the thoughts of those who fight the war.

Book VI is titled "The End of the Third Age", though it has also been called "The Return of the King" and similar to Book IV it is starts out focused on Frodo and Sam, with the specter of Gollum tagging along. Starting with Sam's daring rescue of Frodo, it continues with the two trying to make their way to Mount Doom. However, the changes less than a third of the way through the book, when their quest comes to an end, and the rest of the book involves all the characters again. Unlike many modern books and movies, the action doesn't end with the climax, and Tolkien takes his time telling the story of the aftermath of the war.

As with the previous books in the series when compared with the movie I personally prefer the book, though I have enjoyed the all the movies as well. However long the movies are, they are but condensed versions of the books, and if left unread, you will miss out on many significant characters and events, as well as be unaware of the changes made by those creating the movies from what was written originally. The movies were a valiant effort to bring this epic to the screen, and they honor Tolkien's overall story, but to fully appreciate what Tolkien created, you need to read the books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The king returns, Jan. 24 2008
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: The Return Of The King (Paperback)
"Return of the King" is the worthy climax to J.R.R. Tolkien's epic saga, the fantasy that created the genre as we know it today. Now, as the blockbuster movie adaptation is over, many readers are checking out the dramatic story that ends Tolkien's masterpiece, and the best known part of his life's work.

The story opens where "Two Towers" left off. Gandalf has ridden to the city of Gondor with Pippin (partly to keep him out of trouble), where the forces of Mordor are attacking. There is upheaval in the city itself, as the steward of Gondor is going nuts. Merry pledges his service to King Theoden of Rohan, not knowing what is ahead for the king and his relatives. And Aragorn is seeking out allies to fight Sauron on a military scale, even if they can't defeat him unless the Ring is destroyed. His search will take him to tribes of forest-dwellers, to Gondor -- and even to summon an army of the dead.

In Mordor, the unconscious Frodo has been captured by Sauron's orcs, and taken to the fortress of Cirith Ungol. Sam is desperate to free his friend, but knows that he can't take on an army, and that Frodo would want him to finish the quest. Sam manages to free Frodo from captivity, but they must still brave more dangers before they can come to Mount Doom, the only place where the Ring can be destroyed. As they travel Sam sees Frodo slipping further and further into the Ring's grasp. Will Frodo be able to destroy the Ring?

Usually, the climax of an epic adventure is a disappointment. "Return of the King" succeeds in almost every way, wrapping up each individual storyline, one by one. The ending has a feeling of finality; this is one story that could never have a sequel; Tolkien shows that in a war like this, there is no true "happy ending." Even if the good guys win, there will still be scarring, and death, and haunting memories of what once happened. And even if a person survives, he will never be the same.

This is the grimmest of the three books in this trilogy. Frodo and Sam are stuck in the vividly horrific Mordor, while the city of Minas Tirith is on the verge of completely crumbling. Tolkien does a phenomenal job of exploring the madness, despair, rage and sorrow that accompany a war, and the way it can affect even the idyllic Shire. And he doesn't forget the slow period of healing that follows -- for people, for civilizations, and even for nature.

Though a section of the book near the end descends into near-biblical prose, which changes post-Gondor, Tolkien does not waver in his ability to evoke emotion. One of the most touching scenes in the book is when Sam finds Frodo naked, unconscious and being beaten by an orc. Others include Merry's farewell to Theoden, Eowyn's slaying of the Witch-King, and of course the bittersweet final scene.

Speaking of Frodo, this trilogy's hero is almost unrecognizable in parts of this book. The bright, naive young hobbit of the first book has been worn down to a pale shadow of himself. As he grows increasingly attached to the Ring, we even see him doing what seems unimaginable: threatening Sam with a dagger. Sam has come a long way from the shy young hobbit who couldn't say a word around the High Elves -- now he's attacking orcs and carrying Frodo to Mount Doom.

And the supporting characters are not neglected either, with the younger hobbits being exposed to the horrors of war, Aragorn breaking fully into his role as the future king of Gondor, and passionate war-maiden Eowyn affecting the war as nobody else could. Some much-loved characters are lost, and others will be permanently changed.

The story doesn't really end on the last page; for more background, especially on Aragorn and Arwen, readers should also read the appendices at the end of the book. Another good addition is "The End of the Third Age," in which the unpublished epilogue of this book can be found. Though this is probably not canonical, it nicely concludes the story and is a heartwarming look at what happens in the years following "Return of the King."

It's difficult, once the story has finished, to accept that one has to say goodbye to Middle-Earth and its enchanting inhabitants. But as Gandalf says, "I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The king returns, March 22 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
"Return of the King" is the worthy climax to J.R.R. Tolkien's epic saga, the fantasy that created the genre as we know it today. Now, as the blockbuster movie adaptation is over, many readers are checking out the dramatic story that ends Tolkien's masterpiece, and the best known part of his life's work.

The story opens where "Two Towers" left off. Gandalf has ridden to the city of Gondor with Pippin (partly to keep him out of trouble), where the forces of Mordor are attacking. There is upheaval in the city itself, as the steward of Gondor is going nuts. Merry pledges his service to King Theoden of Rohan, not knowing what is ahead for the king and his relatives. And Aragorn is seeking out allies to fight Sauron on a military scale, even if they can't defeat him unless the Ring is destroyed. His search will take him to tribes of forest-dwellers, to Gondor -- and even to summon an army of the dead.

In Mordor, the unconscious Frodo has been captured by Sauron's orcs, and taken to the fortress of Cirith Ungol. Sam is desperate to free his friend, but knows that he can't take on an army, and that Frodo would want him to finish the quest. Sam manages to free Frodo from captivity, but they must still brave more dangers before they can come to Mount Doom, the only place where the Ring can be destroyed. As they travel Sam sees Frodo slipping further and further into the Ring's grasp. Will Frodo be able to destroy the Ring?

Usually, the climax of an epic adventure is a disappointment. "Return of the King" succeeds in almost every way, wrapping up each individual storyline, one by one. The ending has a feeling of finality; this is one story that could never have a sequel; Tolkien shows that in a war like this, there is no true "happy ending." Even if the good guys win, there will still be scarring, and death, and haunting memories of what once happened. And even if a person survives, he will never be the same.

This is the grimmest of the three books in this trilogy. Frodo and Sam are stuck in the vividly horrific Mordor, while the city of Minas Tirith is on the verge of completely crumbling. Tolkien does a phenomenal job of exploring the madness, despair, rage and sorrow that accompany a war, and the way it can affect even the idyllic Shire. And he doesn't forget the slow period of healing that follows -- for people, for civilizations, and even for nature.

Though a section of the book near the end descends into near-biblical prose, which changes post-Gondor, Tolkien does not waver in his ability to evoke emotion. One of the most touching scenes in the book is when Sam finds Frodo naked, unconscious and being beaten by an orc. Others include Merry's farewell to Theoden, Eowyn's slaying of the Witch-King, and of course the bittersweet final scene.

Speaking of Frodo, this trilogy's hero is almost unrecognizable in parts of this book. The bright, naive young hobbit of the first book has been worn down to a pale shadow of himself. As he grows increasingly attached to the Ring, we even see him doing what seems unimaginable: threatening Sam with a dagger. Sam has come a long way from the shy young hobbit who couldn't say a word around the High Elves -- now he's attacking orcs and carrying Frodo to Mount Doom.

And the supporting characters are not neglected either, with the younger hobbits being exposed to the horrors of war, Aragorn breaking fully into his role as the future king of Gondor, and passionate war-maiden Eowyn affecting the war as nobody else could. Some much-loved characters are lost, and others will be permanently changed.

The story doesn't really end on the last page; for more background, especially on Aragorn and Arwen, readers should also read the appendices at the end of the book. Another good addition is "The End of the Third Age," in which the unpublished epilogue of this book can be found. Though this is probably not canonical, it nicely concludes the story and is a heartwarming look at what happens in the years following "Return of the King."

It's difficult, once the story has finished, to accept that one has to say goodbye to Middle-Earth and its enchanting inhabitants. But as Gandalf says, "I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil."
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5.0 out of 5 stars please place in the proper reading order, Dec 12 2011
By 
Liz. C (Edmonton, AB) - See all my reviews
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I always enjoy reading this as part two of "the Lord of the Rings". To approach it any other way is to rob it of the proper context, and therefore its true potential to entertain and transport the reader to another world. If approached properly, this author's works should be enjoyable for many.

To anyone considering this 3 part story, try reading "the Hobbit" first. It is a valuable introduction to this world of characters and an easy way to find out if you have a taste for J.R.R.Tolken's works. It also gives you information on events and characters that are often referred to throughout "the lord of the rings" and a sense of this story's background. This adds valuable context.
Bottom line: If a person is familiar with "the Hobbit" then they will simply find it easier and more enjoyable to read "the lord of the rings" for the first time.

The two towers is the most detailed section of this story, and the easiest in which to get lost, (or bored)so it should be read in the proper order; after "the fellowship of the Ring" and (preferably) after "the hobbit"
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Two Towers, Oct. 18 2011
This review is from: The Two Towers (Hardcover)
Great read, good to add to collection. Fast shipping and rec'd on excellent condition. Always a pleasure to do business with Amazon related retailers.
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The Two Towers
The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien (Hardcover - Dec 15 2005)
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