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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Excellent book. One of the best sci-fi novels out there. Good writing and interesting characters make this a really good read.
Published 2 months ago by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent book detailing a fictional colonization of Mars
I liked the concept, and was captivated almost immediately by the story. However, as the story progressed, the novel slowed down significantly, almost to a boring pace. There are several characters of which the story is told from their point of view, but the dry writing style makes it difficult to emphasize with any of the characters - the book feels too scientific and...
Published 10 months ago by David Sapira


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent book detailing a fictional colonization of Mars, Sept. 6 2013
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I liked the concept, and was captivated almost immediately by the story. However, as the story progressed, the novel slowed down significantly, almost to a boring pace. There are several characters of which the story is told from their point of view, but the dry writing style makes it difficult to emphasize with any of the characters - the book feels too scientific and not fun. There is a dash of political intrigue built in which adds an extra layer, but I put this book down many times during my read (out of sheer boredom). If you're looking for good sci-fi, I'd probably start somewhere else.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Really? This makes it on to ten-best lists? Must be a pretty thin field., July 15 2014
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Endless and tedious descriptions of imaginary landscapes and geology. Utterly implausible "just so" stories of technical and scientific advances that appear on demand and are implemented on the first attempt. Epic constructions without the economic or industrial foundations they would require. Extreme and two dimensional political characterizations. Credulous lectures on fringe economics and neuroscience.

Suspension of disbelief won't cut it for this mess.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An exercise in scientific speculation, at times an excessive one, June 25 2014
This review is from: Red Mars (Mass Market Paperback)
The Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson is without a doubt a must for anyone who loves to read or write about this planet. Certainly it is a huge work from many points of view.
This first book focuses on the first colonization of the planet imagined in the very near future in respect of our present, while the book was written back in 1993. Then it continues in a time span of several decades describing the beginning of a terraforming project.
On the one hand we see the usual optimism of this kind of science fiction to imagine an event of titanic proportions in a relatively short time, which will certainly be denied by the facts. Beyond that, you can hardly call this book a novel. Sure, there are characters and their stories, linked with each other, but from a narrative point of view it seems more like a series of episodes, shown from different points of views, giving us a choral narration, in which there isn't a true protagonist if not Mars itself.
The individual stories, however, appear to be just an excuse for the author's attempt to immerse himself in other fields, mostly scientific ones, although he often tends to lead to sociology, politics, and even psychology. The result is a book that tends to look more like a speculative treaty than a true novel. The characters suffer about that, thus ending up in the margins. Most of them are not making much to be loved. I admit that I had trouble to get fond to them. The only one I really liked is Frank, maybe because I have found him the most human one, with his virtues and especially with his flaws. Too bad he was then hit by the karma of some too politically correct American stories, according to which, if you do something reprehensible, and at the end you have to pay somehow.
The book is still for the most part interesting, especially if you're looking for an in-depth pseudoscientific study. At the base of speculation there is a very accurate science, the result of considerable research. Perhaps the worst problem of this book is to have wanted to exceed in this sense, focusing too much on technical aspects at the expense of fiction.
In some parts I got bored and I skipped many pages. I do not regret it. At one point, in the part of the expedition narrated by the psychologist, the author leaves for a tangent with a very boring and unnecessary psychological disquisition. When the scope was more purely scientific, I read it with interest.
One thing that jars is the desire to be obsessively accurate from a scientific perspective and then expand without limits into the speculative part, arriving in my opinion to exceed.
The finale ends in catastrophism, an argument that I cannot generally stand, not only in the narrative, leaving you with a bad taste in the mouth, because the mood of the story starts with an optimistic base to arrive in a crescendo of drama to an excessive epilogue.
Having to give an overall opinion, it is undoubtedly a remarkable book, but not an easy read, due to its complexity and length. Certainly, however, it leaves you with something.

Rita Carla Francesca Monticelli, author of Red Desert - Point of No Return
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, May 18 2014
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Excellent book. One of the best sci-fi novels out there. Good writing and interesting characters make this a really good read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars really a 3.5 star book, April 2 2014
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Pretty good, creative but some of the characters were flat - responding typically. I will definitely read the rest in the series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great read, May 23 2013
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This review is from: Red Mars (Mass Market Paperback)
Great research and discription went into this book really enjoyed it. The story on both Mars and discussion on what is happening on Earth are quite realistic. Although sci-fi the dates are not too far off.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely solid science fiction, March 13 2013
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This review is from: Red Mars (Mass Market Paperback)
There are lots of stories of meetings with strange alien creatures, and battles in space, etc.
This is not one of those books.
Red mars reads like high grade historic fiction, about the future.
The Book is strongly character driven, and manages to surprise without ever feeling planned or contrived. The descriptions are often long and heavy on science, so if you are hoping for a light read with action scenes etc try somewher else. If you are looking for a book that weaves togeather the lives of dozens of distinct and memorable characters, showing both their strengths and weaknesses and how the two are one and the same, with an accurate depiction of physics, history, biology and trust, then this is a book worth reading.
I swear the author must have had at least a dozen PhD's to write this thing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kim Stanley Robinson Does Mars - RED, Jan. 6 2012
By 
fastreader - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Red Mars (Mass Market Paperback)
This whole series: RED, GREEN and BLUE, fully explores Mars like we wish we could, but can't afford.

Character development as is usual with Kim Stanley Robinson is great as are the various scientific aspects of the books [you actually learn some actual science ].

Lots of adventure and excitement throughout make it an enjoyable read from start to finish. I've read this series twice now, IT'S THAT GOOD.
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4.0 out of 5 stars God and the devil in the details, July 7 2004
By 
Dennis Grace (Austin, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Red Mars (Mass Market Paperback)
Kim Stanley Robinson does a masterful job of realizing a diverse array of characters, not the least of which is the planet itself. I found Ann and Frank exasperating, John and Nadia at times exhilirating and something of a disappointment, Sax and Hiroko equally inscrutable, and Maya making me wish someone would just slap her. I am astonished that anyone can keep track of so many personnae and keep their voices distinct.
Equally, I am astonished by Robinson's command of geology, meteorology, thermodynamics, and even economics. The details read well and ring true. For years, I wondered why no one had covered this sort of project in detail: terraformation, colonization, expansion. Most writers seem satisfied to take these things as read. Robinson shows what a great literary work a little delving (okay, a whole lot of delving) can produce.
On the down side, the details occasionally get in his way. In particular, I found three details more than a little discomfiting.
First, in the personna of Michel, Robinson outlines his personal psychometry of personalities. In doing so, he provides both an oversimplification of human character and an unwelcome glimpse at Robinson's methodology for building characters. Like sausage-making and legislation, perhaps this process would have been better left unexamined.
Second, I think the abundance of water in the substrate of Robinson's Mars is more than a tad optimistic. I realize that having to bring in water ice from the asteroid belt and Saturn's rings would have slowed the development quite a bit, but considering what a wealth of story Robinson typically finds in the details, I think this obstacle would have made for even more excellent writing opportunities.
Third, in a move that appears nothing more than a technique to allow character continuity, Robinson introduces the deus ex machina of a revolutionary new genetic longevity treatment. With no foreshadowing or side-plot leading to it, the main characters suddenly have a chance to live for a thousand years. My, how convenient. This device left he second guessing the author's motives through the rest of the series. I love the books, but I don't think this was a necessary addition. As the principal plotline of this first book readily demonstrates, key characters can die without compromising the story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC BOOK, June 1 2004
By 
alex (Lewisburg WV) - See all my reviews
This review is from: RED MARS (Hardcover)
Everyone keeps talking in their reviews about how Robinson wanted to appear so clever, so smart in these books. I wonder if it ever occured to any of them that maybe they are just too stupid to understand. That's clearly the case in my opinion. I found the inclusion of all the technical details very informative and interesting. If you want to read moronic escapist garbage go to your local book store's sci-fi section, close your eyes, and pick the first book your hand lands on. Have a great trip!
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Red Mars. Kim Stanley Robinson
Red Mars. Kim Stanley Robinson by Kim Stanley Robinson (Paperback - July 1 2009)
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