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Showing 1-3 of 3 reviews(3 star)show all reviews
on April 9, 2002
This text is well written and enjoyable. Thornton takes pains to explain in English what he's doing with the mathematics. However, the manufacture of the book is terrible. I had only been using the book for a few months when it split in half right down the spine.
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on January 23, 2002
Pros:
The Hamiltonian and Lagrangian sections were well-explained.
Good intro to mathematical formalism/style used in higher level courses. Notation a little clunky though. No use whining about the Math; just get used to it if you want your degree and graduate school.
Problems were interesting & challenging, but will kill newbies... more on that below.
Cons:
The other sections were so-so. Very often I could not see the forest for the trees. Initiates need some kind of context/background to fit the various topics together and with what they already know.
It's not readily obvious that intuition is just as important as analysis in Dynamics problem-solving--no advice given in this respect. Caused me to use up too much time trying to crack a problem when my approach was unsuitable in the first place.
Examples did not help in solving the problems; often felt like I was thrown into the deep end of the pool before I could swim.
Try Schaum's Outlines, Landau, Goldstein as well. Feynmann's Lectures give some background.
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on November 20, 1999
For an introductory classical mechanics book, Marion is definitely lacking. I have been using his book, though, as a second resource to Goldstein's Classical Dynamics, since his examples (particularly the Lagrange problems and small oscillation problems) are very helpful. I agree with other reviews in that he does not delve deeply enough, theoretically, into the heart of classical mechanics.
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