Customer Reviews


53 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (17)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (8)
1 star:
 (14)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book from Al Ries
Al Ries (and Jack Trout at that time) created blockbusters classics books POSITIONING and MARKETING WARFARE.
I think Al Ries still wrote a great marketing book and this one is worth reading and thinkering.
PR creates branding, advertising defend the brand, hmmm. both are important.
The book is easy to read and hold a lot of truth. It is a bit...
Published on Dec 28 2003 by T SANTOSO

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars The rise of PR
Most parts of this book impressed me, however some parts did not and it often seemed to point ou the obvious. They did a good job distinguishing the different between advertising and PR but using different examples to show how PR is more modern than advertising yet we view the advertising ass classic and somewhat essential. However, sometimes they drag on with exlaining...
Published on Feb. 17 2004 by Adam Sopper


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Do not spend a dollar on advertising before you read this book, Sept. 2 2008
By 
Pierre Lapointe "www.maclap.biz" (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Fall Of Advertising And The Rise Of Pr (Paperback)
The Ries father and daughter team put in proper perspective the role of advertising in today's economy: what it cannot do, what it can no longer do and where it still serves a purpose today. With numerous examples and good humour they expose the obsolescence of most common beliefs about advertising.

They effectively contrast the waning power of advertising with the growth of truth oriented public relations. We have become a society of sceptics, quick to recognize and punish the deceiving; but also quick to appreciate the authentic. The Ries explain the need for patience and truth in using Public Relations as an effective tool to build solid high value brands.

This is a quick read. I found it well written and entertaining.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars Same old stuff, June 30 2004
By 
For some reason, Both Ries and Trout get away with recycling their old material and putting a new name on it.
More than that, you couldn't tell that their partnership fell apart years ago since the same ideas, and more importantly, the same examples are used extensively in each man's books.
For Example:
These guys must LOVE Papa Johns (or be shareholder's, as they both mention the compony time and time again (In multiple books as well) as some paragon of food and of great marketing. As far as I'm concerned, Papa John's is indistinguishable from Domino's. I wonder if either man has ever even tried it.
Anyway... back on track.
This book continually simplifies the reasons behind the success and/or failure of various companies and products to the poor use of publicity. No mention of poor management or rationalizing markets, or the fact that the product or service stunk in the first place.
The most appaling thing is this guy has the balls to tell the city of Cusco in Peru and the country of Guatamala, they should change names in order to attract visitors. (Ciudad de las Incas and Guatamaya, respectively). I don't know if this is marketing ignorance, or American disregard for foreign cultures, but I couldn't believe what I was reading.
He continues to show his ignorance of technology and pop culture with incorrect example after incorrect example.
For example, he points out that there was once a beer called Yuengling that failed because of it's name. Guess what, Al, Yuengling, is alive and doing pretty well.
Also chapters are repetitive. After reading about Red Bull 3 times, in as many chapters, it got a little boring
To sum it up: Advertising is bad, Brand extension is bad. Anyone who didn't listen to his advice is now out of business, Papa John's is great. There I saved you the agony of reading this (Or anyother of his books or the books by Jack Trout) and $15.
Save your money. A stinker of a book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars PR is King, June 23 2004
By 
Randall D. Schultz (Albuquerque, NM United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Fall of Advertising & the Rise of PR by Al Ries & Laura Ries
I agree with the thesis of this book: PR can change perceptions but advertising can't. I've been preaching about the credibility of PR for years (it's more believable because the message is delivered by the supposedly unbiased media.) Advertising, on the other hand, isn't believable because everyone knows that it's a company's paid-for message. Ries & Ries further state that advertising has crossed over into the realm of "art" rather than remaining a form of communication. They point out that the yardstick by which ad agencies measure the success of their ad campaigns is the number of creative awards they win--not whether or not the ads actually sell products. On this, the authors are absolutely right. Ads (especially TV ads) don't sell anymore, they entertain. It's a waste of money for companies to advertise as much as they do. So, even though the authors overstate their case and repeat it incessantly, follow the advice of Ries & Ries and spend more money on PR!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars The Rise of "PR" Spin, March 29 2004
By A Customer
Regardless of the fact that the Ries' recently opened their own PR firm, and are "marketing" it through the regular channels (including advertising venues), the book does offer a PR perspective, albeit an alternative view of what can be accomplished in brand introduction. However, the majority of Integrated Marketing Communication campaigns adequately do the same and even more. Securing space in newspapers (the standard PR vocation), and attempting to get something for "free" still drives the PR industry. The demise of advertising is highly premature ($249.2 billion in 2003). The business of America Mr. Ries is still business. The "spin" remains too thin and lacks legitimate credibility. IMC....That's where we're going.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars The rise of PR, Feb. 17 2004
By 
Adam Sopper (Fitchburg, MA USA) - See all my reviews
Most parts of this book impressed me, however some parts did not and it often seemed to point ou the obvious. They did a good job distinguishing the different between advertising and PR but using different examples to show how PR is more modern than advertising yet we view the advertising ass classic and somewhat essential. However, sometimes they drag on with exlaining the difference, and use too many example in a row that may throw people off. The thing I liked is that when distinguishing advertising and PR, they try not to show how they are different, but how it is impossible for them to be the same. This led into how nothing can be mass produced without PR.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars The Fall of Advertising, Feb. 17 2004
By 
Kevin Duff (Fitchburg, MA) - See all my reviews
Al Ries and Laura Ries offer the opinion that no one believes advertising and using public relations is the way to get your product out there. The book also uses examples of companies and how spending more on advertising doesn't guarantee more sales. The book goes in-depth in describing a lot of the public relation campaigns.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting opinions, but calling it research is a stretch, Jan. 7 2004
By A Customer
The central theme of the book is credibility and how PR is the surest route to building it, since "No one believes advertising." As other reviewers have pointed out, there are a number of arguments based on correlation, rather than cause-effect: "Chevrolet spends the most on advertising and has (therefore?) the lowest sales." Even more irritating are the armchair assessments of what other companies/countries should have done when building their campaigns with no real supporting evidence that the recommended strategies would have been effective. Guatemaya? In addition, even though the authors assert that PR is the best way to build a brand, they point out that it doesn't appear that the professional PR organizations (which are few and far between) even mention this fact in their charters. So, what it really comes down to is a very specific view of PR, using a very specific PR strategy which, as luck would have it, can't be found at a local PR firm...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book from Al Ries, Dec 28 2003
By 
T SANTOSO "Creating WOW and AHA!" (Surabaya, Indonesia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Al Ries (and Jack Trout at that time) created blockbusters classics books POSITIONING and MARKETING WARFARE.
I think Al Ries still wrote a great marketing book and this one is worth reading and thinkering.
PR creates branding, advertising defend the brand, hmmm. both are important.
The book is easy to read and hold a lot of truth. It is a bit "bitter" for the advertising people (and they will probably hate the book or play some other defences). But i agree that a lot of new advertising is more of an "ART" than a tool for better sales. I love Al Ries thinkering about whatever loses its functions will become an "art" ( think horse, paintings, even architectures etc) and that advertising is in the danger of losing its function (to make better sales) and becoming an "art" instead.
A lot of truth and things to think about and to learn from the book, even that it is very "opinionated".
I think this is one of the "have to read" for people in advertising, PR, marketing and even CEO.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars interesting theory, but is lacking strong supporting facts, Sept. 26 2003
By 
It is not uncommon to hear the fall of advertising, and the rise of PR. The book illustrates some interesting points. But the authors use facts that are not objective enough. e.g. does really advertisement will attract opposite ideas (promoting safety of the tyre actually triggers people to think about the accident?? I don't think so) So overall, the book, though not necessary totally unbelivable, unadvoidably give me an impression that it is only a subjective heresay.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Asserts Good Case for Brand Building, Sept. 23 2003
By 
"olisiwa" (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
With a title like this, why would anyone in the advertising world want to read this book?
Two reasons. One, some clients are bound to and forewarned is forearmed. But better yet, many of the points the authors make can be easily refuted.
To start with, they have a marked propensity for the "assertion" school of argumentation, i.e. state one fact: Nissan ran a popular ad. State a second fact: Nissan's sales went down. Conclusion: The ad didn't increase sales. Did anyone say "post hoc ergo propter hoc"?
But, to be fair, they definitely do a good job of describing many of the flaws of the traditional ad agency model: its over-reliance on creativity for creativity's sake; its penchant for line extensions and its inability to build on ideas "not invented here". And they make a very good case for what is at the core of brand building, namely novelty. There's no question that new ideas, new names and new categories are what makes news.
However, some of the public relations triumphs they cite seem utterly disconnected from the day-to-day world of PR practice. The mere fact that Sony's Playstation ended up on the cover of Newsweek or that at one point in time there were more articles about Amazon than former president Clinton can't automatically be attributed to the efforts of some PR agent or surely the authors would have named him or her. On the contrary, both of these items were just newsworthy. Thus, the apocalyptic title of this book may be stretching it a bit.
But, in the end, this book does suggest a new definition of the role of mass advertising that should come as music to the industry's ears. What they maintain is that mass advertising's fundamental role is as insurance to protect a brand's established franchise. In other words, while it may take a host of things to establish a new brand, once that brand is established and begins to lose some of its novelty and newsworthiness it needs something-ads-to protect its position. This is an interesting observation and an important one to advertising agencies because it plays right into the natural tendency of clients (and businesspeople in general) to want to minimize risk. Positioning advertising as another tool in the risk-avoidance area, like interest rate swaps or commodity hedges, as opposed to as an imperfect tool for brand building might give advertising an entirely new saliency.
And who in the ad business doesn't want that?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 26 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xad0e39c0)

This product

The Fall Of Advertising And The Rise Of Pr
The Fall Of Advertising And The Rise Of Pr by Al Ries (Paperback - April 29 2004)
CDN$ 18.50 CDN$ 13.36
Usually ships in 2 to 4 weeks
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews