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on May 24, 2004
The book The Boy Next Door by Meg Cabot is about a girl named Mel, who had a neighbor who was an old lady. The old lady was knocked on the head by an anonymous person and she went into a coma. This old lady, named Helen Friedlander had two cats and a dog. Somebody had to take care of the animals so Mel had to do the job but it interfered with her life and her work. Helen's only relative is her nephew Max Friendlander. Mel e-mailed Max and asked him to come and stay with the animals. He said yes, but he secretly sent one of his friends in his place, John. Mel and John fell in love, and there are even more hardships and conflicts from there on. It was a fun book to read. The author, Meg Cabot used very great details.The whole book is e-mails back and forth among different people. Meg Cabot always kept me wanting to keep turning the pages; this book was never boring. I felt like I was actually there in the book it was so real. I think teenage girls would like this book, and maybe even women in their twenties or thirties.
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on May 21, 2004
The Boy Next Door
By Meg Cabot
Reviewed by Johanna Saunders
The Boy Next Door is a book that is filled with emails about people's lives. The main character, Melissa Fuller, tells about her life after her eighty-five year old neighbor has gone into a coma. Melissa must then decide how to balance work, and taking care of her neighbors pets. Until she realizes that her neighbor has a grandson who's a famous photographer. And must then try to find out how to track him down. After finally finding his email address, she emails him to ask if he could come up (from the Florida Keys) to look after his grandmas pets. Although he says that he can come up, he doesn't. And instead, decides to send up his best friend in his place, without informing Melissa that it really isn't him. He only did this because he wishes to stay in Key West with the beautiful supermodel Vivica. Not only did Alex see no harm in sending his best friend in his place, but the last thing that he even imagined happening, came true. And now his best friend, John Trent, is in love with Melissa. Now they are in the tightest situation possible, they could either tell Melissa all that has happened, and that he isn't really Alex. Or his other possibility is to get out of there as quickly as possible, without even warning Melissa or Alex about his problem. Not only that, but now John has been showing up on many different scenes that might suspect that he isn't really who she thinks, for example, showing up on crime scenes, so that he can write some of his newspaper articles for The New York Post. What will happen between Melissa and John? Read The Boy Next Door to find out!
This book really appealed to me because of the main plot. It's always fun to read about people with different, untrue identities, and how they deal with telling people that it's not really them. And the many scenes when it was a close call for Melissa to find out that John's not really who he appears to be. The Boy Next Door would definitely be a good book for anyone who enjoys reading an interesting romance novel.
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on March 25, 2004
Reading Meggin Cabot's The Boy Next Door is a voyeur's dream. Comprised solely of e-mails, this novel offers the reader a peek into the lives of a group of friends and colleagues of reporter Mellissa Fuller, who's gossip column titled Page Ten is loosely based on the New York Post's legendary Page 6.
While I recommend this book and marvel at the author's ability to clearly tell this "girl unknowingly meets soulmate/millionaire" story and to allow it to unfold naturally in a series of often hilarious e-mails, it does lack the authenticity of some of the more popular first person fictionalized accounts of life in New York City.
I would doubt strongly that Ms. Cabot has ever worked as a gossip reporter and consequently this book lacks the rich details that The Devil Wears Prada and the Nanny Diaries provide. Still The Boy Next Door is a worthwhile read with enough character development to keep you happily occupied for the ten hours or so that it takes to read it.
Where Cabot's book far exceeds Prada Devil and Nanny Diaries is that this is a classic story with a beginning, a middle and an end. It's compelling from the start, suspenseful in the middle and all the loose ends are tied up at the conclusion.
While most readers between 15 and 50 would find this book enjoyable, I strongly recommend it to teenage girls looking for a fun look into the lives of 20-somethings finding their way in the world.
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on March 24, 2004
The Boy Next Door focuses on the life of Melissa Fuller, a 27 year old journalist working at the New York Journal in Manhattan. Melissa's life is chronicled through emails written by her to coworkers, friends, her parents, and even some emails by characters who are not that relevant to the storyline but keep the story moving forward. Mel's life is turned upside down the day she finds her elderly neighbor unconscious in the apartment next door to her seemingly attacked by an unknown assailant. After her neighbor is put in the hospital, she must take over the dog walking duties for her neighbor until Mrs. Friedlander (the neighbor)'s nephew comes and moves in to look after the apartment. The only problem is, Max Friedlander is not who he seems to be... His real name is John Trent and he is a member of an affluent family of Manhattan and also happens to work for the New York Chronicle, the Journal's main rival. As John and Mel try to solve who attacked Mrs. Friedlander together and become closer than just plain "neighbors", John realizes he has fallen in love with Mel and she with him. The only problem is that Mel has fallen for a guy who is actually impersonating another guy! As John tries to summon the courage to tell Mel the truth about his identity, the reader is taken on an amusing journey through Mel's trials and tribulations in her emails.
I absolutely loved this book! I adore the Princess Diaries (another series written by Meg Cabot) and while this book is actually meant for a more mature audience, there isn't anything that is too bad in it... maybe one or two parts in the entire book, so it is worthwhile reading. It is just so funny and I couldn't put the book down! I read it in 6 hours!! My only complaint is that I sometimes got confused by who was writing to who and if the author had put dates in the email headings, it would have been much easier for the reader to identify the passage of time the book covers. Also, everyone seems to speak in the same voice, so it was a little confusing to know who was speaking... But other than that, it was a great book and I highly recommend it!
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on March 23, 2004
Reading Meggin Cabot's The Boy Next Door is a voyeur's dream. Comprised solely of e-mails, this novel offers the reader a peek into the lives of a group of friends and colleagues of reporter Mellissa Fuller, who's gossip column titled Page Ten is loosely based on the New York Post's legendary Page 6.
While I recommend this book and marvel at the author's ability to clearly tell this "girl unknowingly meets soulmate/millionaire" story and to allow it to unfold naturally in a series of often hilarious e-mails, it does lack the authenticity of some of the more popular first person fictionalized accounts of life in New York City.
I would doubt strongly that Ms. Cabot has ever worked as a gossip reporter and consequently this book lacks the rich details that The Devil Wears Prada and the Nanny Diaries provide. Still The Boy Next Door is a worthwhile read with enough character development to keep you happily occupied for the ten hours or so that it takes to read it.
Where Cabot's book far exceeds Prada Devil and Nanny Diaries is that this is a classic story with a beginning, a middle and an end. It's compelling from the start, suspenseful in the middle and all the loose ends are tied up at the conclusion.
While most readers between 15 and 50 would find this book enjoyable, I strongly recommend it to teenage girls looking for a fun look into the lives of 20-somethings finding their way in the world.
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on March 20, 2004
While the idea of telling novels entirely through e-mail is becoming more common, this is the first novel I had read using this style. The main character, Melissa Fuller, who works at New York Journal as the gossip columnist seems like a fun, genuinely nice person. Her main problem is she can't find a man, a good man that is. Then, one of her elderly neighbors is found in her apartment unconscious, apparently the victim of an attempted murder. Her only living relative is a playboy photographer named Max, who has MUCH better things to do they come to his aunt's apartment and watch after her animals. So what does he do? He asks an old college buddy John Trent, to fill in for him. John agrees, until he meets Melissa, and realizes she's the girl he's been looking for. Although a bit predictable in some spots, I found the novel pretty cute, and I liked how lesser characters, like Melissa's parents and John's sister-in-law were included. The only thing that really bothered me what the fact that sometimes the style of e-mail to tell a story made me feel like I didn't get to know the characters as well as I liked. However, for a cute, quick read, it was only a minor problem.
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on February 17, 2004
The Boy Next Door is written by New York Times bestselling author, Meggin Cabot, who also wrote The Princess Diaries. In this book, Cabot replaces the traditional letter by e-mailing between characters throughout the whole book. There are no chapters in the book, but instead the book consists of series of e-mails that give new information about the characters every time.
In The Boy Next Door, Melissa Fuller is a redheaded reporter who serves for the gossip column on page 10 from The New York Journal, knowing that she could do better than a gossip columnist. During her plain and dull life living in an apartment in New York City, her 82 year-old next door neighbor, Mrs. Helen Friedlander, went into a coma (which Mel believed that it was caused by a ¡§so-called Transvestite Killer¡¨) and that was the start of the best part of her life. Although she has to help walk the neighbor¡¦s dog that threatens her job, after she found the neighbor¡¦s nephew, Maxwell Friedlander, to walk the dog, her career was saved temporarily; they also begin a romance. Just when Mel thought Max was the guy she wanted to marry, she found out about his true identity and who the real attacker of the ¡§brutal assault¡¨ of Mrs. Friedlander is.
Even though fiction novels seem unrealistic sometimes, events in The Boy Next Door could actually happen. The characters are well developed, and through the e-mailing process, it is an easier way to read. Since there are no chapters in this book, you don¡¦t know when to stop and it makes it impossible to keep track of time! This is a good entertainment book to put away all the stress from work with its humor between the characters and the romance between Mel and ¡§Max."
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on October 22, 2003
The Guy Next Door is an extremely successful romance novel by Meg Cabot, the author of "The Princess Diaries".
The book is based around bubbly New York City girl, Mel Fuller who works as a ten-page gossip columnist for the New York Journal. After helping her neighbour from a violent intruder, she has gained Paco, a Great Dane. Not exactly what she wants.
She seeks help from Max Friedlander, who is her neighbours nephew and only relative. However, Max sends his friend John Trent to pose as him. This is meant to solve all problems, but this only creates more!
I think Meg Cabot has written this in a very funny way and the use of e-mails allows us to really see the thoughts of the very unique characters. I think the contrast of characters is a very good technique because it allows you to see situations from different people's points of view. For example, we have Dolly Vargas, a typical City girl, who loves gossip and scandal. Then there is Nadine who is really caring and a bit of a worrier.
This book kept me gripped from the very beginning to the end. The mixture of loveable characters and the humorous plot makes this one of best romance novels I have ever read.
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on October 22, 2003
The Guy Next Door is an extremely successful romance novel by Meg Cabot, the author of "The Princess Diaries".
The book is based around bubbly New York City girl, Mel Fuller who works as a ten-page gossip columnist for the New York Journal. After helping her neighbour from a violent intruder, she has gained Paco, a Great Dane. Not exactly what she wants.
She seeks help from Max Friedlander, who is her neighbours nephew and only relative. However, Max sends his friend John Trent to pose as him. This is meant to solve all problems, but instead, this only creates more!
I think Meg Cabot has written this in a very funny way and the use of e-mails allows us to really see the thoughts of the very unique characters. I think the contrast of characters is a very good technique because it allows you to see situations from different people's points of view. For example, we have Dolly Vargas, a typical City girl, who loves gossip and scandal. Then there is Nadine who is really caring and a bit of a worrier.
This book kept me gripped from the very beginning to the end. The mixture of loveable characters and the humorous plot makes this one of best romance novels I have ever read.
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on September 25, 2003
Melissa "Call Me Mel" Fuller is the page 10 gossip columnist for the New York Journal and really wants to be able to write some serious editorials. However, her editor won't let her because Mel is one of those people who actually cares about who Winona Ryder is dating. But Mel thinks that she has a chance at selling a story to her editor when her elderly next-door neighbor, Mrs. Friedlander, is attacked, putting her in a coma in the hospital and making Mel late for work - for the 37th time that year! Her editor doesn't buy it, which is too bad, because Mel could really use someone cutting her some slack. After all, who else is going to walk Paco, Mrs. Friedlander's Great Dane, and feed her two cats? Everyone at work tells Mel to stop being such a wimp and to dump the problem on Max Friedlander, her neighbor's playboy nephew. So Mel drops the problem in Max's lap, who promptly turns to his old college friend, John Trent, who owes him a huge favor since he stopped him from marrying that stripper in Vegas. John isn't too excited about posing as Max, even if it is only for a few days, until he meets Mel. John is instantly attracted to her and can tell that she likes him, too. There is just one problem - she thinks he is Max!
This book is just so fun to read! I read it easily in one sitting and the whole thing just flew by. The story is told in the form of emails as Mel writes her soon-to-be-married best friend, her best friend's chef of a fiance, the real Max, John the fake Max, the mean spirited human resource department at work, John's brother and sister-in-law, John's fabulously wealthy grandmother, Mrs. Friedlander's dog and cats, as well as a host of other zany characters who all seem to be way too interested in Mel's love life or lack thereof. Anyway, you will love all of the characters as they are all real people going through those crazy things that life throws at you. Mel is especially wonderful and it is so fun to see her personality shine through her emails rather than the author describing everything that is happening. If you have enjoyed any of Cabot's other tales than you know how wonderful she is! Do yourself a favor and buy this book!
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