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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I've ever read
I love this book! An exciting adventure. Exotic. Lots of meaningful messages. This book makes me re-think about many aspects of my life. I learned a lot from the messages. I'm glad I read this book, and this book is good for me. I don't mind what other people are criticizing.

I feel like I understand the criticisms, though. Aboriginals are praised, and in...
Published 18 months ago by Curious Puppy

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Absolute Rubbish
Intellectually, most of the ideas are better presented in Daniel Quinn's "Ishmael", "Story of B" and "My Ishmael". Esoterically, there is nothing new here. The bulk of the "inward" ideas can be gleaned from any study of Native American spirituality, the rest are lifted for the most part from "A Course in Miracles" (which is often hijacked by bestselling New Age...
Published on Sept. 15 2003 by machinus


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Mutant Message Hoax?, March 3 2003
By 
I started reading this book at the suggestion of a friend and very quickly felt that something was wrong. Although I have never read any other books about Australian aborigines I had a gut feeling that much of this was made up. I did a quick search on [the internet] under the author's name and came up with a critique by an Australian anthropologist which should be read in its entirety.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ugly, badly written fraud, Sept. 24 2002
By 
G. Miller (Berlin Deutschland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It's extremely rare that Australian aborigines choose one person to speak for them collectively, this book made it happen. Robert Eggelston, director of an aboriginal cultural institute was empowered by a coalition of many tribes to condemn this book as a fabrication and a fraud. He travelled in the outback for 16 months trying to find any aborigines who had heard of Ms Morgan or the 'Real People' tribe she claims to have met. No one had. Is it plausible that a previously unknown American woman would discover a tribe that has evaded discovery by european settlers for 200 years and by other tribes for 50 000 years or more?
Morgan claims her story is true, and only sold as a novel to protect this special tribe. But almost every page of this book contains "facts" that are so wildly innaccurate that it is inconcieivable that she experienced anything of the desert, let alone ancient nomadic ways and lore. She describes cutting her feet horrendously while walking over spinifex grass, but spinifex grows in clumps and in the desert is widely spaced. Not even experienced bushman can walk around in the desert sun heat without a hat, the way Ms Morgan claims she has. People die doing that, including aborigines. Ms Morgan survives, however and even meets crocodiles out there.
The tribe she describes is nothing like any other aborigines in Australia, but surprisingly similar to American Indians. This tribe has a chief, like no other in Australia, and he wears a head dress of parrot feathers. Names and tribal structures are completely unlike anything in ANY Australian tribe, but, again, more like Native Americans, as are desriptions of rituals, and musical instruments. Her descriptions of nomad life often seem derived partly from books and partly from pure fantasy. Her 'tribe' pay no respect to territories of other tribes, enter sacred sites without ritual preparation, carry all sorts of stuff with them and use valuable water for cooking. They collect dingo droppings for fuel - although dead wood is far more plentiful. Her description of the way didgeridoos are made is completely wrong.They are cut from living trees, not dead ones; termites are found on the inside not on the outside (they die in heat and light); and they do not make "sawdust" - they digest wood. Anyone who has actually seen this could not make these kind of errors.
This book is neither fact nor fiction. It misrepresesents exploits indigenous Australians with its claims of authenticity, and exploits her readers' spiritual longing and desire to connect with and learn from the indigenous peoples of the earth. The fact that this book has achieved mainstream popularity indicates a genuine and widespread desire to learn about aboriginal spirituality. I find it a tragedy that this gap is being filled by such a culturally worthless piece of deception.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars bunk? i think not, Nov. 11 2001
When I read this book I was initially skeptical. But after a time, I found it very uplifting and enlightening. Then I read of the controversy surrounding it. After doing some research on the web, I found many sites claiming this book to be a "hoax." That is what fascinated me. Why would a book about a white woman traveling with traditional Aborigines be so controversial? The author even allows you to either take her story as fiction or not....But then why are so many groups so critical of her story?? So ready to discount it?? If it is just a work of fiction, why the absolute denigration of her story?? I ask, how could a health care worker from the Mid West concoct a tale with so much depth and insight? If she wanted to just make money, as some claim, why not write about encounters with aliens, or a 'how to get rich quick scheme in real estate' (which seems to sell so well). I question those who dismiss this book as fiction...how can a story so rich in detail and emotion be so easily dismissed? Who are those critics and what do they have to hide?? Please read this book. So very few books these days are uplifting to the soul and spirit. It is a another step into that journey of understanding that we all seek. And those that dismiss this story as a hoax have many more miles to travel before they are able to see what this book means to their own soul and to the souls of all of us, forever intertwined,and always as One.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good message despite the controversy, Nov. 30 2001
Mutant Message Down Under is a book of many facets. Regardless of how much is true, (and which, by the way, I feel is not the point of the book) the message has a universal approach and one that should be read with an open mind.
Author Marlo Morgan's story of her journey across the Australian Outback seems unbelievable at first. Why would a tribe of Aborigines specifically select Ms. Morgan for this journey? What makes her so special? Also, it is hard to imagine a woman from a large U.S. city, dressed to the nines and getting excited for what she thinks is an award presentation for her civic work with half-breed Aborigines, then realizing her "award" is a 4-month long walkabout with The Real People -- and accepting this fate so readily!! Eating bugs and tadpoles seems second nature to Marlo Morgan -- Survivor contestants would have nothing on her!
But Mutant Message is more than just this outrageous walk across the desert. The Real People have something to say, and they have chosen Marlo Morgan as their vehicle to spread the word. While I'm not sure if I agree with everything these Aborigines have said, there are several things that make good sense, regardless of how much into the controversy a person is. Living life simply, but honestly; not putting too much importance into material things; harboring bad feelings or grudges instead of just closing the circle and moving on -- these are all wonderful life lessons that would make us all better people if only we could do them.
In my opinion, Mutant Message is not a full-on masterpiece; the writing mostly reads like a National Geographic article. However, peel away the scientificness and controversy, as well as all the things that seems unreal or fiction, and what you would have left is this beautiful message about life, all living things, and how we are all one people. Certainly this message needs to be heard.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is by far my favorite book!, Oct. 23 2005
This review is from: Mutant Message Down Under (Paperback)
This book made me really look at the things we're doing wrong as a civilization! Fact or fiction, this story has a strong message about life. I have no idea if Marlo Morgan really was "chosen" by the Tribe's people to present and relay a message to the rest of the world. But wouldn't it be neat to think that they really do have a wise and intelligent message to send? I recommend this book to anyone who looks for a deeper meaning to why we are here in the first place.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Is it True?, Feb. 14 2008
This review is from: Mutant Message Down Under (Paperback)
Who cares? If you read a book for entertainment, and hope to walk away with a little more insight, food for thought, or just a good feeling, then you will probably get at least one of these from this book. If you need it to be absolutely correct, completely believable, and brilliantly written, you should look elsewhere.
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5.0 out of 5 stars For Adding Depth to your character by culture and maturity, March 8 2004
This book there is no clone for.I believe thier Dreamtime they were nude and so nude on earth.This book says they are leaving this Plane of reality,to new guardians.That Makes me sad.I hope more of ther culture will be preserved in Libraries,there is one movie,Photography and books.I would love to meditate in sacred opal lined caves the made for religious ceremonies.They have kabongs which are totems,Oracle of the Dreamtime by Donni Hakason is good with this book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars as fiction still fascinating!, Jan. 26 2004
The author states in her forward that this is not about all aboriginals but a small select group and they are what this story pertains to. It is listed as fiction and that is what it is. Even though it is fiction, it still has an important message to those of us who are open-minded and like to make up their own minds as to whether or not there is any validity in what she has to say.
The author is summoned to Australia and invited to meet with an an aboriginal tribe. She thinks it is going to be a luncheon deal and ends up going on a walk-about with them. What she learned about the nature of these people and their beliefs was fascinating. They were here for over 50,000 years, according to the author (doubtful), one of the first ever.
She said they could communicate through telepathy and didn't need to speak because of the purity in their souls-also said because of their purity they didn't need Jesus (this is where we know for sure it is fiction). We, the mutants, cannot because we have too much in our minds that we don't want others to see and want to hide from others, so we can't open up to telepathy. Possessions are very important to us and to them it is not. The simple life, void of jealousy, greed, stress, hate, etc. has made them a people who live to be a hundred and twenty years old. When they finally decide that they want to move on to a new life and leave this one they have a celebration and then they just shut down their bodies and die and come to another phase in their being. Interesting thought.
The things that they ate are certainly not what we would be used to and would make many of us gag at the thought, but it was interesting that while we tend to get senile and lose our eyesight and hearing as we age, they didn't seem to, they were very alert and healthy. They had there own system of healing that, if true, would be absolutely amazing, but (?)....!
It was interesting also, that, in their secret hide-a-way, they had their history painted on their walls, showing that there had probably been nuclear testing and flying saucers indicating aliens-which at one time I thought could be possible, but upon reflection, I think they would have been man-made and if there were any odd looking characters flying them it would more likely be Satan's demons or the like.
According to her story, they have practiced environmental care for as long as they have been on earth and yet have now decided to not have anymore children because the earth is being destroyed an cannot sustain life much longer unless we take better care of it.
She says she has been chosen to send their message with hopes that enough will listen. I really enjoyed the book and know that there were many truths in it that we would benefit from, if heeded, and then there are some that each individual needs to realize that are subtle propaganda and dangerous to an unsuspecting Christian. It is a book that will make you think. Give it a try!
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3.0 out of 5 stars good lessons, good read., Jan. 25 2004
By 
I learned alot from this book, I don't think it exploited the natives at all, in fact I developed an awareness for thier culture. I find it interesting that the natives in every society are pushed out and regarded as uncivilized. I really think its this excessive consumerism that plagues all these fat americans and beyond as uncivilized. I was completely surprised at the angry reviews this book has received on this board, as I was led to this book by an instructor. I really enjoyed it. I've shared it with friends. Pooey on you meanies!
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2.0 out of 5 stars You're all correct on this one, Dec 8 2003
By 
A. Thompson "Skeptic" (Harrisonburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've enjoyed the mixed reviews on this book at least as much as I enjoyed the book. Most of the reviews are most insightful (into the reviewer if not the book). This book is syrupy sweet new age regurgitation, and it certainly is fiction. If you like that kind of thing (Wayne Dyer approved!), then enjoy. Think of it as 'Spiritualism for Beginners'. Easy to read, easy to put down, easy to dismiss if you don't agree with it.
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Mutant Message Down Under
Mutant Message Down Under by Marlo Morgan (Paperback - May 13 2004)
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