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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just Hysterically Funny, But Unbelievably Smart
Over the past year, I've become a huge Christopher Moore fan. This guy LOVES to write these stories - you can tell - and that makes them a real pleasure to read. While everyone enjoys his humour, he's also very clearly a smart, perceptive and unique literary voice.

Coyote Blue is probably at the top of my list because it is a classic Moore treatment on the...
Published on April 21 2007 by MagicMan

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Moore enthusiasts will enjoy this early novel.
If you are already a fan and need a Moore "fix," this novel will keep you thoroughly occupied with its wacky charm, its light-hearted approach to cosmic issues, and its skewed, but respectful, treatment of Native American life and traditions. Coming after Practical Demonkeeping, his debut novel, it has many of the elements for which Moore has become so (justly) popular...
Published on July 4 2002 by Mary Whipple


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just Hysterically Funny, But Unbelievably Smart, April 21 2007
By 
MagicMan (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Over the past year, I've become a huge Christopher Moore fan. This guy LOVES to write these stories - you can tell - and that makes them a real pleasure to read. While everyone enjoys his humour, he's also very clearly a smart, perceptive and unique literary voice.

Coyote Blue is probably at the top of my list because it is a classic Moore treatment on the mythology of the Trickster God, something Moore seems to divinely possess a unique and intelligent understanding for.

Ribald, edgy, absurd and fatalistic, Coyote Blue starts the engine and never takes its foot of the accelerator. It claims, like Lamb, a literary geography between sacred and sacriligious that seems and feels an impossible place to write. But Moore not only finds that space, he revels in it, squeezing an amazingly insightful portrait of Coyote out of not just the mythology, but a real understanding what what the Trickster God represents and how these stories could be told in a modern comedic plot.

Funny, shocking and surprisingly moving, I highly recommend Coyote Blue. I'm sure this is one of few books that I'll pick up and read cover-to-cover again soon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Moore hillarious fun and antics...., Nov. 16 2003
By 
girldiver "Enjoy!" (tangled up in blue.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Where else can you find a zany jokester indian GOD, a corrupt condo manager, a multi-religious blond woman, and a bunch of hard riding bikers.
Christopher Moore does it again in this laugh out loud funny story of Sam Hunter, runaway Crow Indian turned slick talking Santa Barbara insurance salesman. Sam Hunter has spent 17 years away from his heritage, building a so called life amoung the white man has made Sam Hunter a hollow man with a mercedes, cool condo, and a closet full of armani suits. Then a beautiful but odd blond woman strikes his fancy and a Zany Indian God turns his life upside down. All of a sudden his very planned and predictable life becomes a complete nightmare and he is afraid 17 years of hiding his crime will be revealed. Same struggles with his identity, love, doubt, and ultimately his religious beliefs.
This is a wild, crazy journey full of wacky and racy events that will make you break out in laughter so read it where you can laugh out loud and not get kick out.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Something Moore to howl about., June 30 2003
By 
G. Merritt - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
After leaving his Crow reservation in Montana at age fifteen, Samson Hunts Alone changed his name to become Sam Hunter, a "hardworking, intelligent, and even likable" (p. 15) Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a townhouse, and a "steady, level, and safe" life (p.16). Although his yuppie lifestyle seems perfect on the surface, Sam suffers from "Coyote Blue," the constant fear that something might go wrong to upset his "world of one" (p. 117). After meeting Calliope Kincaid, a free-spirited woman with the power to inspire men "to art and madness" (p. 64), and a mysterious, shape-shifting Indian (none other than Old Man Coyote) shortly after his thirty-fifth birthday, Sam nearly loses everything--his Mercedes, his money, his career, and his condo, only to discover himself in the chaos of his new life.
Filled with unforgetable scenes such as a coyote humping a leather sofa "like a furry jackhammer" (p. 50), Moore's second novel, COYOTE BLUE, is a quirky, entertaining novel, that will leave you howling with laughter.
G. Merritt
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3.0 out of 5 stars Moore enthusiasts will enjoy this early novel., July 4 2002
By 
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
If you are already a fan and need a Moore "fix," this novel will keep you thoroughly occupied with its wacky charm, its light-hearted approach to cosmic issues, and its skewed, but respectful, treatment of Native American life and traditions. Coming after Practical Demonkeeping, his debut novel, it has many of the elements for which Moore has become so (justly) popular with his later novels, though its plot and characters are not as fully developed, and the book is not as outrageous or crazily funny as those.
Sam Hunter, the main character, is a 35-year-old California insurance salesman, a Crow Indian whose real name is Sam Hunts Alone. Having attacked a policeman as a teen, Sam became a fugitive from the Crow Agency, and now, twenty years later, leads a totally predictable, boring life--that is, until Old Man Coyote (the trickster), Sam's spiritual helper, arrives, bringing "chaos--the new order in his life."
A beautiful woman, her biker-druggie-ex-lover, and an assortment of wackos, stir up the action, as Sam tries to figure out who he really is and, with Coyote's "help," learn what he is capable of. Lots of wild action and some potentially hilarious scenes are reined in, a bit, by Moore's focus on Sam's Indian traditions and why they are, or should be, important to him, a subject serious enough to curtail the uninhibited flights of craziness that we now expect from Moore. This is fun, but it's a somewhat more thoughtful novel, overall, than the outrageous, campy stories for which Moore is now famous.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Coyote Blue will leave you "howling" for more Moore!, March 13 2002
By 
David J. Gannon (San Antonio, TX USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Christopher Moore's novels have an underlying theme to them. They are vehicles that poke fun at various "legends" of the paranormal-vampires (Bloodsucking Fiends), Godzilla (Lust Lizzard) and so on-while concomitantly poking fun at the "California Lifestyle" of type-a personalities espousing New Age psychobabble.
In Coyote Blue the legendary figure being skewered is Trickster, an ancient Native American god know generally for bollixing up the works in whatever situation he inserts himself. The "works" targeted by Trickster here is the life of Sam Hunter, the Southern California makeover of the former reservation baby known as Samson Hunts Alone of the Crow reservation in Montana.
The plot involves Sam's involvement/Tricksters interference with Calliope, a classic, comic version of the hippie child of hippie syndrome so common in LA, the setting for this farcical tale.
The book continues in the vein of Moore's works in general--looping, fantastic flights of fancy, complex yet entertaining plots, and frequent wise guy humor that leaves the reader laughing out loud.
This book differs from his other efforts only in that the story line is more controlled and more thoroughly constructed than is usual. It gives the book the feel of an actual, complete novel in the traditional sense.
However, one does not read Moore to experience novelistic integrity-one reads Moore to laugh one's head off. This novel, like all his others, scores a bull's-eye on that score.
If what you are looking for is a lot of laughs and a rollicking good time, Moore is your guy and this book will satisfy those cravings in droves.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Another Trip in the Wacky Mind of Christopher Moore, April 17 2001
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
I've enjoyed everything I've read by Christopher Moore, and though I liked "Coyote Blue" there are some serious gaps in the plot. As usual there is a lots of zaniness and a few laugh out loud parts. Also Moore again does a great job with his characterization. Moore can write characters that you will remember for a long time. In total the storyline is what knocks it down a few notches from Moore's other works.
"Coyote Blue" is return to your roots story about Sam Hunter. Sam a Crow Indian has to leave is reservation after accidentally killing a police officer. Sam moves to California where he becomes an insurance salesman. His new life has everything a nice car, a fancy house and lots of money. What Sam does not have is his heritage, something that he has been trying to hide. He meets Calliope Kincaid and wish for her. That is when Old Man Coyote a shape shifting Indian god shows up. He slowly starts to ruin Sam's new life. Sam tries to rid himself of Coyote, but when Calliope's old boyfriend kidnaps Calliope's son Grubb, Coyote and Sam must team together for a quest that leads them to Las Vegas and then Wyoming and Sam's reservation.
Three stars may seem a bit low, but this novel takes to many leaps of fate even for Moore. The novel storyline has just a few too many holes in it, also uncharacteristic too Moore. I do recommended this novel however and you do need to look past the novels flaws and enjoy another trip in Moore's mind. This is still good but not his best.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The joke's on us!, Aug. 29 2000
By 
Curtis L. Wilbur "zencoyote" (San Diego, California USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
The author's challenge is to get us to read a story that has been written countless times before. Is the public ready for yet another novel about someone's not-so-carefully hidden past catching up with him? Why not invoke the Trickster of Native American legend? Let's see: A little shape-changing here, a few jokes there. Throw in some buckskin, and PRESTO! A brand new novel that everyone loves.
This Coyote, though, seems strangely attached to his human cohort. Moore paints a Trickster bent on leaving a wake of legend behind in the human world. He lives in the stories people tell.
Perhaps we're seeing a little of Moore's own philosophy here, leaving his own footprints on humanity's tapestry of lies. Or maybe behind everything else, Coyote himself has enticed Moore to write, because he truly does need his stories told, and only people can tell them. In that case the joke's on us.
Coyote, in true form, comes off as a parody of himself. No matter. If the Trickster wants to swindle and beguile a little reverence away from us, then so be it. If we can laugh a little on our short drive from womb to tomb, so much the better. If you're gonna make the trip, may as well take the big blue car.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great understated redemption story, well told, with humor., Aug. 25 1997
By 
jskinner@seidata.com (Madsion, Indiana USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
In addition to the often mentioned humor and twists of plot in Chris Moore's Coyote Blue, there is a very well done story of a life lost and redeemed.

Somewhere early on in the story I became aware, almost subconciously, of the saddness of the protagonist's plight. Forced to deny his personal identity, one out of the mainstream of the society he is forced to spend his life in, Sam's highly developed coping skills are just beginning to crack when the Trickster appears. The zany antics of the Trickster only contribute to Sam's redemption.

Moore's development of this aspect of the plot is really remarkable as it manages to come through, in a subtle yet relentless manner, in the midst of all the other elements of the story. This is an indication of how developed is Moore's writing technique and no small tribute to his stroy telling skill. This book works very well on several levels
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4.0 out of 5 stars mostly fun, Aug. 1 2000
By 
K. Mohnkern (Pittsburgh, PA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Amazon.com has been recommending Coyote Blue to me for some time now, presumably due to my generally high ratings for Tom Robbins. This book is sort of a Robbins-Lite. We've got an enjoyable puree of natural and supernatural, without Robbins' mastery of the metaphor. Now, Moore's writing is clever and funny, but Robbins' makes me smile at least once per page.
In Coyote Blue we get a man facing up to his past (at the insistence of an ancient Native American god) and falling in real love for the first time. The best bits were the Native American myths told from a 20th Century point of view. The worst bits came at the end of the book. I won't give it away, but I will say that it's too much deus ex machina, even for a book about gods. Everything up to that point had made sense in its own way, but this was too much.
I will read more Moore, but I won't expect brilliance - just fun.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the Best, Aug. 16 1997
By 
E. Arthur (USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Christopher Moore is my favorite author and this is probably his best work. "Coyote Blue" on the surface is an excellent suspense and love story. But as you peel back the layers upon layers, you find deeper meaning. The Trickster is alive and well and easily recognized in many people we know and Mr. Moore made this harsh reality visible and funny. How can you not love a book with magic, faith restored, life renewed, true love conquering all, and a coyote humping a white leather sofa. <G> It has it all! The storytelling is done by the master and the humor is unrelenting as the trickster weaves his tale. A must read book! I really did laugh out loud through most of it and cried at least once. I just can't say enough about this book. Except, if you read it, you will thank me! I loved every carefully chosen word.

Erma Arthur, Reading Forum Assistant, MS
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Coyote Blue
Coyote Blue by Christopher Moore (Paperback - May 13 2004)
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