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5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining
Moore's characters are memorable. What do you get when you mix a
beautiful woman, her biker ex-lover, and a few assorted oddballs?
Published on Jan. 12 2003 by adam9z

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Moore enthusiasts will enjoy this early novel.
If you are already a fan and need a Moore "fix," this novel will keep you thoroughly occupied with its wacky charm, its light-hearted approach to cosmic issues, and its skewed, but respectful, treatment of Native American life and traditions. Coming after Practical Demonkeeping, his debut novel, it has many of the elements for which Moore has become so (justly) popular...
Published on July 4 2002 by Mary Whipple


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5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, Jan. 12 2003
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Moore's characters are memorable. What do you get when you mix a
beautiful woman, her biker ex-lover, and a few assorted oddballs?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Just Hysterically Funny, But Unbelievably Smart, April 21 2007
By 
MagicMan (Nova Scotia, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Over the past year, I've become a huge Christopher Moore fan. This guy LOVES to write these stories - you can tell - and that makes them a real pleasure to read. While everyone enjoys his humour, he's also very clearly a smart, perceptive and unique literary voice.

Coyote Blue is probably at the top of my list because it is a classic Moore treatment on the mythology of the Trickster God, something Moore seems to divinely possess a unique and intelligent understanding for.

Ribald, edgy, absurd and fatalistic, Coyote Blue starts the engine and never takes its foot of the accelerator. It claims, like Lamb, a literary geography between sacred and sacriligious that seems and feels an impossible place to write. But Moore not only finds that space, he revels in it, squeezing an amazingly insightful portrait of Coyote out of not just the mythology, but a real understanding what what the Trickster God represents and how these stories could be told in a modern comedic plot.

Funny, shocking and surprisingly moving, I highly recommend Coyote Blue. I'm sure this is one of few books that I'll pick up and read cover-to-cover again soon.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Everyone Needs a Good Bad Example, March 10 2004
By 
Mary L Wagner (Fayetteville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Coyote Blue is laugh-out-loud hilarious. As Moore warns in the pronunciation guide, don't try reading this in public. With each book of Moore's, I become more amazed at his ability to be obscenely funny and satirical, yet somehow respectful to the deepest truths underlying the story.
The characters in this book are a little thinner than usual, but that may be due to so many of the characters being attributes in human form. The minor characters like Adeline Eats were very well portrayed. The storyline seemed a little jumpier to me than usual also, with major shifts in time and place, but that may be because I was reading so fast, since Moore's books always pull you along like a crazy amusement park ride.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Moore hillarious fun and antics...., Nov. 16 2003
By 
girldiver "Enjoy!" (tangled up in blue.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Where else can you find a zany jokester indian GOD, a corrupt condo manager, a multi-religious blond woman, and a bunch of hard riding bikers.
Christopher Moore does it again in this laugh out loud funny story of Sam Hunter, runaway Crow Indian turned slick talking Santa Barbara insurance salesman. Sam Hunter has spent 17 years away from his heritage, building a so called life amoung the white man has made Sam Hunter a hollow man with a mercedes, cool condo, and a closet full of armani suits. Then a beautiful but odd blond woman strikes his fancy and a Zany Indian God turns his life upside down. All of a sudden his very planned and predictable life becomes a complete nightmare and he is afraid 17 years of hiding his crime will be revealed. Same struggles with his identity, love, doubt, and ultimately his religious beliefs.
This is a wild, crazy journey full of wacky and racy events that will make you break out in laughter so read it where you can laugh out loud and not get kick out.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Something Moore to howl about., June 30 2003
By 
G. Merritt - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
After leaving his Crow reservation in Montana at age fifteen, Samson Hunts Alone changed his name to become Sam Hunter, a "hardworking, intelligent, and even likable" (p. 15) Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a townhouse, and a "steady, level, and safe" life (p.16). Although his yuppie lifestyle seems perfect on the surface, Sam suffers from "Coyote Blue," the constant fear that something might go wrong to upset his "world of one" (p. 117). After meeting Calliope Kincaid, a free-spirited woman with the power to inspire men "to art and madness" (p. 64), and a mysterious, shape-shifting Indian (none other than Old Man Coyote) shortly after his thirty-fifth birthday, Sam nearly loses everything--his Mercedes, his money, his career, and his condo, only to discover himself in the chaos of his new life.
Filled with unforgetable scenes such as a coyote humping a leather sofa "like a furry jackhammer" (p. 50), Moore's second novel, COYOTE BLUE, is a quirky, entertaining novel, that will leave you howling with laughter.
G. Merritt
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5.0 out of 5 stars Moore's best, May 28 2003
By 
Alan Wolff "knightswhosayni" (Albuquerque, NM United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
My children love the Coyote stories. If you live in the American Southwest, or just enjoy mythology, you're probably familiar with the Trickster myths. Even if you're not, this is a wonderful spin on Coyote, strictly for adults. The premise is wonderful and Moore's excution is right-on with an updated view of Coyote's antics. Moore's alternate views of what we tend to take for granted are also priceless: I still chuckle when I think of Seuss's Sam I Am.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A truly funny book, and a bit more, May 17 2003
By 
Charles G. Fry "cgfry" (Madison, WI) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Coyote Blue is the first novel of Christopher Moore's I have read, and it is easy to see why he is so popular. The whole book is a crazy, zany, wild ride for the reader and main character alike, and ultimately reaches a higher quality that transcends the goofiness. Moore presents a completely hilarious character, the Crow god Coyote. Coyote and a number of Crow legends (I have no idea how historically accurate they might be) are always invoked in significant ways in the story, however, and force thoughtfulness and serious consideration on the reader. In other words, I was laughing as much as I ever have with a book, while at the same time mulling over some serious issues about life in general. Coyote Blue is a wonderful book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Clive Barker meets Kurt Vonnegut, May 2 2003
By 
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
After reading all of Vonnegut's books, and all of Barker's books I was fortunate enough to discover Christopher Moore. While "Lamb" (which I highly recommend) was much more a work of satire, "Coyote Blue" is a comic adventure of absurd fantasy. The book does have some glaring continuity omissions (notably, how one could live under an alias for 20 years and still have a nice car, credit cards and a townhouse is not explained). It's probably best just to ignore this and enjoy the book. Coyote Blue certainly has some laugh out loud moments, and is peppered with clever puns, some I missed then caught it while I was on the next page. Very exciting, if totally absurd, plot development. I like this guy's writing and I'm sure I'll read all his current published offerings soon enough. I'm working on it...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, Feb. 26 2003
By 
L. Parsons "Geek Dad" (Washington, DC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
Blending modern and ancient forklore in the Blender of Comedy, C. Moore has scored another hit against the modern world's belief in it's on sanity. Outrageously funny satire in the style of Douglas Adams and backhanded social commentary.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Moore enthusiasts will enjoy this early novel., July 4 2002
By 
This review is from: Coyote Blue (Paperback)
If you are already a fan and need a Moore "fix," this novel will keep you thoroughly occupied with its wacky charm, its light-hearted approach to cosmic issues, and its skewed, but respectful, treatment of Native American life and traditions. Coming after Practical Demonkeeping, his debut novel, it has many of the elements for which Moore has become so (justly) popular with his later novels, though its plot and characters are not as fully developed, and the book is not as outrageous or crazily funny as those.
Sam Hunter, the main character, is a 35-year-old California insurance salesman, a Crow Indian whose real name is Sam Hunts Alone. Having attacked a policeman as a teen, Sam became a fugitive from the Crow Agency, and now, twenty years later, leads a totally predictable, boring life--that is, until Old Man Coyote (the trickster), Sam's spiritual helper, arrives, bringing "chaos--the new order in his life."
A beautiful woman, her biker-druggie-ex-lover, and an assortment of wackos, stir up the action, as Sam tries to figure out who he really is and, with Coyote's "help," learn what he is capable of. Lots of wild action and some potentially hilarious scenes are reined in, a bit, by Moore's focus on Sam's Indian traditions and why they are, or should be, important to him, a subject serious enough to curtail the uninhibited flights of craziness that we now expect from Moore. This is fun, but it's a somewhat more thoughtful novel, overall, than the outrageous, campy stories for which Moore is now famous.
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