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5.0 out of 5 stars A classic story and a spiritual allegory
If you have not read any of CS Lewis classic book series about Narnia, please do so. The stories are wonderfully written and will engage you like few other works. Part spiritual allegory and part fantasy and adventure, these stories are timeless.
My personal favorite of the 7 stories is this one: The Silver Chair. Starting with the unexpected trip into Narnia,...
Published on May 17 2004 by Michael Erisman

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3.0 out of 5 stars The Least Provocative
As a fan of the Chronicles of Narnia, I was (just a bit) disappointed to find this book, in which Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole go on a quest through Narnia to find Prince Rillian (Prince Caspian's son) the most formulaic. Pole and Scrubb are nipped from their alternative school (which Lewis doesn't let go by without a good ribbing) by Aslan, who sends them forth on a...
Published on July 3 2000 by Stacey M Jones


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5.0 out of 5 stars A classic story and a spiritual allegory, May 17 2004
This review is from: Silver Chair (Paperback)
If you have not read any of CS Lewis classic book series about Narnia, please do so. The stories are wonderfully written and will engage you like few other works. Part spiritual allegory and part fantasy and adventure, these stories are timeless.
My personal favorite of the 7 stories is this one: The Silver Chair. Starting with the unexpected trip into Narnia, the story involves the search for a missing prince and a dangerous and exciting journey to find him. While the plot is quickly engaging and always enjoyable, even after dozens of readings, in this story Lewis uses some of the most powerful of Christian allegories to depict faith, deception, and courage. Choices made along the way are often disastrous and are the result of convenience and comfort over faith. Truly a sound statement into our own journeys, and a spiritual struggle depicted accurately.
I will not spoil the plot, but if you have not enjoyed this series, pick up any of the seven books, or better yet get them all at once. The story starts either with "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe" which was the first published, or "The Magician's Nephew" which is chronologically the first. Either way, you won't be disappointed. Next to "The Silver Chair", I also found "The Horse and His Boy" and "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" to be absolute classics.
Buy this series, and enjoy one of the true treasures in literature from a fabulous writer, the world renowned CS Lewis.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Prince Rilian, Lost Forever or Found, April 30 2004
By A Customer
The book The Silver Chair, by C. S. Luis is a great adventure story that is part of a seven-book series. The story has two main characters; Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole. Eustace Scrubb is a schoolboy who goes to school at the Experiment House with Jill. He has actually been in Narnia before with his cousins; Lucy and Edmund. Jill Pole gets bullied around a lot at school, and didn't believe Eustace at first when he was trying to tell her about Narnia.
The book starts off at the Experiment House with Jill hiding behind a curtain crying because the bullies won't leave her alone. Eustace finds her and tells her about Narnia and how they might be able to get back there. At first Jill didn't believe him. Then bullies came in the room looking for her, so the made a dash for a door that isn't usually open but they tried it anyway because it was their only way of escape. To their surprise, the door was open, but not leading outside the school, but instead to Narnia.
Before I start telling you about Narnia and what happened there; I must give you some background information. The was a queen of Narnia (she was married to King Caspian the 10th) and she had a son named Prince Rilian. One day the queen and prince were out on a walk with some others. The queen was tired and decided to go asleep on the grass. The prince, not wanting to wake her, went off just a little way (so he could still see her) to play. After a little while they saw a green worm crawl out from the wood and bite her. The prince ran after the worm, but it got away. After a few minutes the queen was dead. After that the prince devoted his life to finding the worm and avenging it. After months of looking one of a lord suggested he stop looking for the worm. Prince Rilian told him for the past couple of weeks he no longer searched for the worm, but visited a lady in secret. The lord came with him one day and to his surprise, the lady was in the same spot where his mom died. She was a beautiful woman dressed all in green. The lord decided not to tell anyone because he thought there was no harm in it. The next day, the prince never returned from his journey.
They stepped into Narnia and found they were on the edge of a cliff. Eustace was afraid of heights and just stood there in shock. When he got away from the edge, Jill walked up even closer to the edge, trying to show off, and found she couldn't move and almost fell of the edge but Eustace saved her, and while doing so fell off the edge himself! The next thing Jill knew she was lying down in the same spot with a huge lion (Aslan, the 'Jesus' of Narnia) next to her blowing at something. Then she was Eustace floating, getting higher and farther away from her. She was terrified and very thirsty. Aslan soon left and she found her strength again to lift her-self up to go find some water. She finally found a stream, but Aslan was lying next to it. He said to her, "If you are thirsty, come and drink." She was to petrified to move, but eventually found her courage to go get a drink. He told her he needed her help. She was to, along with Eustace, find the lost Prince Rilian. He gave her signs and directions to recognize the prince; "First; as soon as the Boy Eustace sets foot in Narnia, he will meet an old and dear friend. He must greet that friend at once; if he does, you will both have good help. Second; You must journey out of Narnia to the north till you come to a ruined city of ancient giants. Third; you will find writing on a stone in that ruined city, and you must do what the writing tells you. Fourth; You will know the lost prince (if you find him) by this, that he will be the first person you have met in your travels who will ask you to do something in my name, in the name of Aslan."
Aslan soon blew her to where Eustace landed, and shortly afterwards, and owl came to them and told Trumpkin, the dwarf in charge, that they were there. He gave them good beds, food, ands baths. Jill was just about to go to bed when the same owl (Glimfeather) came tapping on her window and told her he would help them as much as the owls could, then went to tell Eustace the same. Glimfeather flew them both to the owls' meeting spot and got help from another owl to fly them to a Puddleglum's house.
Puddleglum is a marsh-wiggle, which is kind of like a very gloomy person, who always looks at the downside of things. He travels with them their whole journey. They started their journey north the next day. After a couple days of walking they came across what at first looked like boulders, then Jill noticed how they might look kind of like giants at night, then one moved. After a while they came to a bridge and decided to cross it. While they were crossing it they met a beautiful woman dressed in green riding along with a knight. She recommended the gentle giants' city near by to lodge in. After some arguing, they decided to take her advice.
When they arrived they were welcomed and treated nicely. Puddlegum tried to stay on the look out, but he got a little drunk and barely even knew who he was. It turned out the giants actually wanted to eat them, and kept them there for the Autumn Feast coming up. Will they ever escape? If they do, will they find Prince Rilian? To find out read the book The Silver Chair.
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4.0 out of 5 stars More of the same from Narnia - which is not a bad thing, April 24 2004
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This review is from: Silver Chair (Paperback)
Another installment in the classic children's series The Narnia Chronicles, "The Silver Chair" continues the pattern of presenting stand-alone stories that work within a grander story arc. Also like previous installments, "The Silver Chair" brings back familiar characters while also introducing new cast members, lending the story an air of familiarity while still remaining fresh.
In this installment Eustace, the ill-mannered lad who learned the error of his ways in "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," along with his schoolmate, Jill, pair up for adventure. While fleeing bullies at their school - a progressive and modern (for its time) institution that Lewis openly and repeatedly scorns - Eustace and Jill find themselves thrown into the world of Narnia. Once there, Aslan gives Jill a series of vague instructions to follow during their adventure.
Eustace and Jill find themselves on a quest to find the lost Prince Rillian, the son of King Caspian (who in this tale makes two brief cameos as an old man). They team up with Puddleglum, a gloomy a creature called a Marsh-Wiggle who always sees the down side of things. Together, the three go in search of the Prince.
The setup tells the reader right off what sort of story it will be: a traveling adventure in which the group works through a series of dangerous situations and visits new and strange lands. The story takes a few chapters to get moving properly, shortening the main quest; there are only three or so key locations. Still, those locations are a mix of classic genre archetypes and fantastic settings. For an important segment of the story - a castle of giants - genre archetypes rule the day.
"Silver Chair," though it visits places in Narnia not previously seen, feels less epic than previous installments. However, a glimpse of a greater and more wondrous world near the end helps alleviate that failing.
The character of Jill undergoes almost the same transformation that Eustace did in "Voyage," while Eustace himself plays the role that Edmund, Peter and the gang did in earlier books. That's not altogether bad, but it's not altogether good, either, especially if you are reading the whole series straight through. because Jill's transformation immediately follows Eustace's.
All in all, "The Silver Chair" is not as engaging as others in the series, with a loose plot tied together largely by a "you must trust Aslan" theme, but does not fall nearly as flat as "Caspian." For a good stretch the story moves along at a brisk pace and offers a playful series of adventures, delivering just the sort of engaging story that makes the Narnia Chronicles such a beloved series. Sure it suffers from too slow a start and too slow a finish, both which drag the story down, but at its core it's more of the same from Narnia. And that's not a bad thing at all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars C.S.Lewis as the humourless marshwiggle?, Jan. 9 2004
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This review is from: Silver Chair (Paperback)
The 4th book to be written, The Silver Chair is the penultimate offering in Narnian chronology. The central theme of this book seems to be the importance of belief (religious or otherwise; I suppose it depends on how you define religion). Nevertheless, the book is not too esoteric, like the other Chronicles, the plot functions perfectly well on a surface level. In short, the plot concerns two children who are given a task in Narnia. Before returning a king who has disappeared, they must battle giants and a witch, as well as escape from an underground world.
I say this book is about belief because the children are given several immediate tasks which they are told to pursue even though the long term goal and result is not revealed to them. Given the adversity and temptation the children meet along the way, pursuit of the tasks requires a great deal of faith and perseverance. The children are even exposed to willful deceit and witchcraft. Just as they begin to falter, they always receive help from somewhere. This to me is one of the great things about these books; children are both shown to be capable of accomplishing much and shown that if their intentions are good they can expect to receive help along the way. One may ask whether this approach will give children excessive expectations of the world, but I say better to give children hope than a sense of futility, since I believe children are indeed strong, strong enough to suffer the inevitable dashing of hopes. As long as they know there is someone beside them who cares.
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4.0 out of 5 stars C.S.Lewis as the humourless marshwiggle?, Jan. 7 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Silver Chair (Paperback)
The 4th book to be written, The Silver Chair is the penultimate offering in Narnian chronology. The central theme of this book seems to be the importance of belief (religious or otherwise; I suppose it depends on how you define religion). Nevertheless, the book is not too esoteric, like the other Chronicles, the plot functions perfectly well on a surface level. In short, the plot concerns two children who are given a task in Narnia. Before returning a king who has disappeared, they must battle giants and a witch, as well as escape from an underground world.
I say this book is about belief because the children are given several immediate tasks which they are told to pursue even though the long term goal and result is not revealed to them. Given the adversity and temptation the children meet along the way, pursuit of the tasks requires a great deal of faith and perseverance. The children are even exposed to willful deceit and witchcraft. Just as they begin to falter, they always receive help from somewhere. This to me is one of the great things about these books; children are both shown to be capable of accomplishing much and shown that if their intentions are good they can expect to receive help along the way. One may ask whether this approach will give children excessive expectations of the world, but I say better to give children hope than a sense of futility, since I believe children are indeed strong, strong enough to suffer the inevitable dashing of hopes. As long as they know there is someone beside them who cares.
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5.0 out of 5 stars To Save A Prince, July 25 2003
By 
Mark Baker (Santa Clarita, CA United States) - See all my reviews
Eustace and Jill are called from their school to Narnia by Aslan for a task. King Caspian is old and his only son, Prince Rilian, has been taken hostage. Teaming up with the marsh-wiggle Puddleglum, they journey north from Narnia. But with winter fast approaching, their journey isn't easy. Not to mention the danger they face from giants and a stranger they meet. Will they remember to follow the signs Aslan gave them to help them on their way? Even if they do, can they save the prince?
I absolutely love this book in the series. I'd forgotten how much until I reread it. The quest gives a real sense of adventure. And they seem to meet up with plenty of danger along the way. I get a kick out of Puddleglum's pessimism, as well.
The allegory seems stronger in this book then the last couple. The themes of following God's word and Him using us in spite of our faults (and using our faults) is especially strong. Aslan has the entire thing under control from the beginning; it's just up to Eustace and Jill to actually follow his commands.
This is a wonderful fantasy story with some elements included that will make you think. Definitely a strong book in the series. If you enjoyed the others, be sure to pick this one up as well.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best of the Narnias., April 11 2003
By 
blurglecruncheon (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
Although I wore out a copy of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe when I was younger, The Silver Chair(SC) has grown on me since then(and I re-evaluate my rankings each year.) Even without identifying with the nastiness Eustace and Jill deal with at the book's fringes, I can recognize great characterization done well in such a short time.
SC starts in the terrible school that helped make Eustace so in need of change in the precluding Narnia book, Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Now that he has changed, there are rumors he may need to be 'attended to.' He meets behind a gym with a crying Jill Pole, who has just been 'attended to,' and trusts her with how Narnia has changed him, suggesting they try to go back. After all, Eustace's cousins weren't allowed back, but no-one said he couldn't. They manage to get there.
But no-one is allowed into Narnia without a task, and theirs is to rescue a Prince who has been lost for ten years, with his father dying and no-one to inherit the throne. Despite given four signs to watch for by Aslan, the lion that poses as a God-figure for the Narnia series, they botch a few early and get to squabbling. Only their chosen companion Puddleglum, perhaps the most compelling nonhuman character in the series(a Marsh-Wiggle: ganglier and taller than humans and unflinchingly ironic to the point of eliciting "but we can" comments by poker-faced complaints) keeps them together. They hardly feel like heroes as they go through snow and the underworld. There are two telling moments of trust at the end--after several other people have broken their trust--and the escape from the underworld is dramatic.
Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole don't sound like heroic names, and they make plausible mistakes more regularly than the four siblings of earlier books--Eustace even has to face that she's adapted better than he did to Narnia. And even Puddleglum shows some errors in judgement. But the book never moralizes on this. What also separates this book from the other Narnia chronicles in my mind is how Lewis uses the end of the book. I found I didn't want to let go. By throwing in some Narnian culture(i.e. a reason why Narnia was particularly worth saving) and meetings with old friends and a reckoning of sorts at the nasty school, Lewis gives us more of what we want.
Then there are the parts I can't spoil, like seeing old friends as you don't exactly expect them, or realizing you've made a mistake and need to face up to it, having to reassess the meaning behind people's actions(for better or worse) or when your mistakes have fortunate positive side-effects, and Lewis never dwells on all this. There's another interesting example to run off to.
I'd recommend buying all the Narnias instead of just one book, as the whole set will be cheaper in the long run, as once you have one you'll probably want the rest. They all have Lewis's vivid imagination molded into accessible language, and although they're quick reads they encourage rereading. Even if you're not "a kid" the series is still worthwhile. When I reread the books on the bus people often say they're glad they're not the only ones still reading this sort of thing.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Silver Chair, Jan. 20 2003
By 
The Silver Chair
I think that after reading the book, The Silver Chair, I would rate it (on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the highest) as a 4. I would have considered The Silver Chair a 5 if there had been a little more action. In the beginning of the book, there are two friends named Jill Pole and Eustace Scrubb. One day while at the experiment house, which was at the school they attended, Eustace began telling Jill about his adventure with Prince Caspian and sailing to the end of the world. He also told Aslan, the great lion king. They wanted to see what would happen if they chanted a particular spell out loud. When they did this, they thought that nothing had happened, but as they were going back to class they found a door in the woods that had not been there before. When Eustace opened it and they both walked through, they found themselves in a place with huge trees and birds flying around. After walking a while, they found themselves at a very high cliff. Eustace fell off the cliff but was saved by Aslan. When Jill and Eustace met again, they set out on their adventure. On their way they met a Marsh-wiggle named Puddleglum. They run into many problems, such as giants and gnomes.
This was an excellent book, and it would have been a 5 (instead of a 4) if it had contained more action. However, it was still a very good book and I would recommend it to anyone. It always keeps you guessing about what was going to happen next. It was not easy to predict. It was also easy to read and would be appropriate for all ages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars a journey of friendship and danger, June 4 2002
This review is from: Silver Chair (Hardcover)
C.S. Lewis' "The Silver Chair" is another great episode in the Chronicles of Narnia. It tells the ongoing story of Eustace Scrubb (my favorite human character in the Narnian stories). This time Eustace and his friend Jill must find and rescue Prince Rillian of Narnia, King Caspian's son.
The Silver Chair operates on so many levels. It is an allegory of Man's interaction with and failure to obey God. It is an argument against the Naturalistic worldview. It is a story of journey and friendship. Most importantly, it is a ripping good tale.
In "The Silver Chair" Lewis introduces us to the often mentioned but never explored (until now) northern countries of his Narnian world. The children are guided by Puddleglum--a Marshwiggle (and also my favorite of the Narnian characters in all the books). Puddleglum was based off of Lewis' own rather frank and earthy gardener. He makes for an unforgettable character.
The children and Puddleglum are faced with exceedingly hard and dangerous challenges along the way. Fortunately, they are never really alone in their trials.
"The Silver Chair" contains some of the best literary imagery in the whole Narnian series. It also features some of the best dialogue in all the chronicles. One cannot overstate the sense of wonder in this story. It is another great chapter in the history of Narnia.
I give "The Silver Chair" my highest recommendation.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Book 6 - A guide to the unending enchantment of Narnia, May 2 2002
"The Silver Chair" was the fourth book published in the Narnia Chronicles, but chronologically is the second last in the series and is published as such by most modern publishers. The story revolves around cousin Eustace (a familiar face from "Prince Caspian") and his classmate Jill Pole. Eustace and Jill narrowly escape school bullies and find themselves in Narnia. In Narnia, Aslan himself commissions them on a quest to find Caspian's missing son and heir, prince Rilian, who has been abducted by an evil witch posing as a beautiful woman and a horrible green snake. They are joined in their quest by Puddleglum, a charming Marsh-wiggle whose extreme pessimism ( "he's always expecting the worst and he's always wrong" p.93) is matched by his bravery. Together they escape the perils of giants, and by rescuing Rilian from his enchantment in the Underworld and restoring him to his father, they prevent the Green Lady from by achieving her evil ambitions in becoming Narnia's queen.
As with all the Narnia Chronicles, on the level of children the story functions as a perfectly comprehensible and exciting fantasy adventure, but on an adult level it imparts powerful spiritual truths about Christianity by means of numerous recognizable Biblical allusions. Lewis intended "The Silver Chair" to portray the ongoing war against the powers of darkness. He emphasizes the truth of Deuteronomy 6 that in this war the signs of God's Word need to be carefully remembered and obeyed: "And whatever strange things may happen to you, let nothing turn your minds from following the signs ... it is so important to know them by heart and pay no attention to appearances. Remember the signs and believe the signs. Nothing else matters." (p.24-26). Failing to follow these signs makes the task more difficult, but not impossible. These failures, however, constitute sin, which is clearly portrayed as the fault of man: "We must just own up" (p.123) and "We've brought the anger of Aslan on us. That's what comes of not attending to the signs." (p.132) The only solution is to drink from Christ the living water, for there is no other source of water apart from him "There is no other stream" (p.20-21). There are also strong allusions to the doctrine of predestination: "You would not have called to me unless I had been calling to you." (p.23) "There *are* no accidents. Our guide is Aslan; and he was there when the giant King caused the letters to be cut, and he knew already all things that would come of them; including *this*." (p.160)
As always, in all the upheavals and conflicts of Narnia, Aslan is the one constant, and it is his vital involvement that enables the children to complete their Narnian quest, just as it is Christ who inspires, comforts, guides, and saves in the real world. Narnia may exist only in Lewis imagination and ours, but these underlying truths about Christ ensure that a journey to Narnia is never without profit for the real world.
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