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on February 7, 2013
This completes my collection of Narnia books with the original illustrations. What a beautiful, magical series! I wasn't ready to read them until very recently, and was profoundly moved by them. They have changed the way I view the world, and how I view myself. I love them so much!
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on November 8, 2011
this was a very good book and a very good and smart purchase on my part. i liked it alot and i would recommend it. good shipping and customer service as well
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This book is part of The Chronicles of Narnia and involves the children Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole who come into Narnia through the work of Aslan while being chased by bullies at their school. Aslan charges the children with finding Prince Rilian who has disappeared years earlier and gives them four signs to help them in their quest. The fourth involves doing something in the name of Aslan. At one point they find themselves the guests of giants only to later discover that their status will change from guests to items on the menu and they make a difficult escape. The book is written simply but beautifully and is full of strange creatures to beguile and endear or to give one the creeps. Fun reading.
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on May 17, 2004
If you have not read any of CS Lewis classic book series about Narnia, please do so. The stories are wonderfully written and will engage you like few other works. Part spiritual allegory and part fantasy and adventure, these stories are timeless.
My personal favorite of the 7 stories is this one: The Silver Chair. Starting with the unexpected trip into Narnia, the story involves the search for a missing prince and a dangerous and exciting journey to find him. While the plot is quickly engaging and always enjoyable, even after dozens of readings, in this story Lewis uses some of the most powerful of Christian allegories to depict faith, deception, and courage. Choices made along the way are often disastrous and are the result of convenience and comfort over faith. Truly a sound statement into our own journeys, and a spiritual struggle depicted accurately.
I will not spoil the plot, but if you have not enjoyed this series, pick up any of the seven books, or better yet get them all at once. The story starts either with "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe" which was the first published, or "The Magician's Nephew" which is chronologically the first. Either way, you won't be disappointed. Next to "The Silver Chair", I also found "The Horse and His Boy" and "Voyage of the Dawn Treader" to be absolute classics.
Buy this series, and enjoy one of the true treasures in literature from a fabulous writer, the world renowned CS Lewis.
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on April 30, 2004
The book The Silver Chair, by C. S. Luis is a great adventure story that is part of a seven-book series. The story has two main characters; Eustace Scrubb and Jill Pole. Eustace Scrubb is a schoolboy who goes to school at the Experiment House with Jill. He has actually been in Narnia before with his cousins; Lucy and Edmund. Jill Pole gets bullied around a lot at school, and didn't believe Eustace at first when he was trying to tell her about Narnia.
The book starts off at the Experiment House with Jill hiding behind a curtain crying because the bullies won't leave her alone. Eustace finds her and tells her about Narnia and how they might be able to get back there. At first Jill didn't believe him. Then bullies came in the room looking for her, so the made a dash for a door that isn't usually open but they tried it anyway because it was their only way of escape. To their surprise, the door was open, but not leading outside the school, but instead to Narnia.
Before I start telling you about Narnia and what happened there; I must give you some background information. The was a queen of Narnia (she was married to King Caspian the 10th) and she had a son named Prince Rilian. One day the queen and prince were out on a walk with some others. The queen was tired and decided to go asleep on the grass. The prince, not wanting to wake her, went off just a little way (so he could still see her) to play. After a little while they saw a green worm crawl out from the wood and bite her. The prince ran after the worm, but it got away. After a few minutes the queen was dead. After that the prince devoted his life to finding the worm and avenging it. After months of looking one of a lord suggested he stop looking for the worm. Prince Rilian told him for the past couple of weeks he no longer searched for the worm, but visited a lady in secret. The lord came with him one day and to his surprise, the lady was in the same spot where his mom died. She was a beautiful woman dressed all in green. The lord decided not to tell anyone because he thought there was no harm in it. The next day, the prince never returned from his journey.
They stepped into Narnia and found they were on the edge of a cliff. Eustace was afraid of heights and just stood there in shock. When he got away from the edge, Jill walked up even closer to the edge, trying to show off, and found she couldn't move and almost fell of the edge but Eustace saved her, and while doing so fell off the edge himself! The next thing Jill knew she was lying down in the same spot with a huge lion (Aslan, the 'Jesus' of Narnia) next to her blowing at something. Then she was Eustace floating, getting higher and farther away from her. She was terrified and very thirsty. Aslan soon left and she found her strength again to lift her-self up to go find some water. She finally found a stream, but Aslan was lying next to it. He said to her, "If you are thirsty, come and drink." She was to petrified to move, but eventually found her courage to go get a drink. He told her he needed her help. She was to, along with Eustace, find the lost Prince Rilian. He gave her signs and directions to recognize the prince; "First; as soon as the Boy Eustace sets foot in Narnia, he will meet an old and dear friend. He must greet that friend at once; if he does, you will both have good help. Second; You must journey out of Narnia to the north till you come to a ruined city of ancient giants. Third; you will find writing on a stone in that ruined city, and you must do what the writing tells you. Fourth; You will know the lost prince (if you find him) by this, that he will be the first person you have met in your travels who will ask you to do something in my name, in the name of Aslan."
Aslan soon blew her to where Eustace landed, and shortly afterwards, and owl came to them and told Trumpkin, the dwarf in charge, that they were there. He gave them good beds, food, ands baths. Jill was just about to go to bed when the same owl (Glimfeather) came tapping on her window and told her he would help them as much as the owls could, then went to tell Eustace the same. Glimfeather flew them both to the owls' meeting spot and got help from another owl to fly them to a Puddleglum's house.
Puddleglum is a marsh-wiggle, which is kind of like a very gloomy person, who always looks at the downside of things. He travels with them their whole journey. They started their journey north the next day. After a couple days of walking they came across what at first looked like boulders, then Jill noticed how they might look kind of like giants at night, then one moved. After a while they came to a bridge and decided to cross it. While they were crossing it they met a beautiful woman dressed in green riding along with a knight. She recommended the gentle giants' city near by to lodge in. After some arguing, they decided to take her advice.
When they arrived they were welcomed and treated nicely. Puddlegum tried to stay on the look out, but he got a little drunk and barely even knew who he was. It turned out the giants actually wanted to eat them, and kept them there for the Autumn Feast coming up. Will they ever escape? If they do, will they find Prince Rilian? To find out read the book The Silver Chair.
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on April 24, 2004
Another installment in the classic children's series The Narnia Chronicles, "The Silver Chair" continues the pattern of presenting stand-alone stories that work within a grander story arc. Also like previous installments, "The Silver Chair" brings back familiar characters while also introducing new cast members, lending the story an air of familiarity while still remaining fresh.
In this installment Eustace, the ill-mannered lad who learned the error of his ways in "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader," along with his schoolmate, Jill, pair up for adventure. While fleeing bullies at their school - a progressive and modern (for its time) institution that Lewis openly and repeatedly scorns - Eustace and Jill find themselves thrown into the world of Narnia. Once there, Aslan gives Jill a series of vague instructions to follow during their adventure.
Eustace and Jill find themselves on a quest to find the lost Prince Rillian, the son of King Caspian (who in this tale makes two brief cameos as an old man). They team up with Puddleglum, a gloomy a creature called a Marsh-Wiggle who always sees the down side of things. Together, the three go in search of the Prince.
The setup tells the reader right off what sort of story it will be: a traveling adventure in which the group works through a series of dangerous situations and visits new and strange lands. The story takes a few chapters to get moving properly, shortening the main quest; there are only three or so key locations. Still, those locations are a mix of classic genre archetypes and fantastic settings. For an important segment of the story - a castle of giants - genre archetypes rule the day.
"Silver Chair," though it visits places in Narnia not previously seen, feels less epic than previous installments. However, a glimpse of a greater and more wondrous world near the end helps alleviate that failing.
The character of Jill undergoes almost the same transformation that Eustace did in "Voyage," while Eustace himself plays the role that Edmund, Peter and the gang did in earlier books. That's not altogether bad, but it's not altogether good, either, especially if you are reading the whole series straight through. because Jill's transformation immediately follows Eustace's.
All in all, "The Silver Chair" is not as engaging as others in the series, with a loose plot tied together largely by a "you must trust Aslan" theme, but does not fall nearly as flat as "Caspian." For a good stretch the story moves along at a brisk pace and offers a playful series of adventures, delivering just the sort of engaging story that makes the Narnia Chronicles such a beloved series. Sure it suffers from too slow a start and too slow a finish, both which drag the story down, but at its core it's more of the same from Narnia. And that's not a bad thing at all.
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on January 9, 2004
The 4th book to be written, The Silver Chair is the penultimate offering in Narnian chronology. The central theme of this book seems to be the importance of belief (religious or otherwise; I suppose it depends on how you define religion). Nevertheless, the book is not too esoteric, like the other Chronicles, the plot functions perfectly well on a surface level. In short, the plot concerns two children who are given a task in Narnia. Before returning a king who has disappeared, they must battle giants and a witch, as well as escape from an underground world.
I say this book is about belief because the children are given several immediate tasks which they are told to pursue even though the long term goal and result is not revealed to them. Given the adversity and temptation the children meet along the way, pursuit of the tasks requires a great deal of faith and perseverance. The children are even exposed to willful deceit and witchcraft. Just as they begin to falter, they always receive help from somewhere. This to me is one of the great things about these books; children are both shown to be capable of accomplishing much and shown that if their intentions are good they can expect to receive help along the way. One may ask whether this approach will give children excessive expectations of the world, but I say better to give children hope than a sense of futility, since I believe children are indeed strong, strong enough to suffer the inevitable dashing of hopes. As long as they know there is someone beside them who cares.
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on January 7, 2004
The 4th book to be written, The Silver Chair is the penultimate offering in Narnian chronology. The central theme of this book seems to be the importance of belief (religious or otherwise; I suppose it depends on how you define religion). Nevertheless, the book is not too esoteric, like the other Chronicles, the plot functions perfectly well on a surface level. In short, the plot concerns two children who are given a task in Narnia. Before returning a king who has disappeared, they must battle giants and a witch, as well as escape from an underground world.
I say this book is about belief because the children are given several immediate tasks which they are told to pursue even though the long term goal and result is not revealed to them. Given the adversity and temptation the children meet along the way, pursuit of the tasks requires a great deal of faith and perseverance. The children are even exposed to willful deceit and witchcraft. Just as they begin to falter, they always receive help from somewhere. This to me is one of the great things about these books; children are both shown to be capable of accomplishing much and shown that if their intentions are good they can expect to receive help along the way. One may ask whether this approach will give children excessive expectations of the world, but I say better to give children hope than a sense of futility, since I believe children are indeed strong, strong enough to suffer the inevitable dashing of hopes. As long as they know there is someone beside them who cares.
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Eustace and Jill are called from their school to Narnia by Aslan for a task. King Caspian is old and his only son, Prince Rilian, has been taken hostage. Teaming up with the marsh-wiggle Puddleglum, they journey north from Narnia. But with winter fast approaching, their journey isn't easy. Not to mention the danger they face from giants and a stranger they meet. Will they remember to follow the signs Aslan gave them to help them on their way? Even if they do, can they save the prince?
I absolutely love this book in the series. I'd forgotten how much until I reread it. The quest gives a real sense of adventure. And they seem to meet up with plenty of danger along the way. I get a kick out of Puddleglum's pessimism, as well.
The allegory seems stronger in this book then the last couple. The themes of following God's word and Him using us in spite of our faults (and using our faults) is especially strong. Aslan has the entire thing under control from the beginning; it's just up to Eustace and Jill to actually follow his commands.
This is a wonderful fantasy story with some elements included that will make you think. Definitely a strong book in the series. If you enjoyed the others, be sure to pick this one up as well.
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on July 22, 2003
Book 6 in a series of 7.
Lucy and Edmund don't appear in his book. Eustace making his 2nd appearance is joined by new character, Jill Pole. They enter Narnia and Jill receives 4 key events in the future that will lead them to the rescue of aging Prince Caspian's son Rilian. They must escape love-to-eat-man giants and battle the Queen who can enchant people with music.
While it is rather sad that the 4 from Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe, it's still a great book and nice addition in the series
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