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35 Reviews
5 star:
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3 star:
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2 star:
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
A wonderfully written book. Full of mystery, suspense, whatnot. A wonderful book by a great author. Not boring at all. You really should read it.
Published on Aug. 30 2002

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother.
I haven't even finished this book. I'm about three quarters of the way. I thought I was love this book so much. It had all my favourite things in it. I found myself groaning when I turned on my Kindle. I read about three books a month, and it is very rare that I can't finish one. I refuse to finish this one though.
Published 9 months ago by Allyanna


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1.0 out of 5 stars Don't bother., Oct. 9 2013
I haven't even finished this book. I'm about three quarters of the way. I thought I was love this book so much. It had all my favourite things in it. I found myself groaning when I turned on my Kindle. I read about three books a month, and it is very rare that I can't finish one. I refuse to finish this one though.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More like 3 and 1/2, May 27 2002
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
This book tells the imaginary story of the creation of the famous british monument around 3000 B.C. It follows the lives of 3 brother, Saban, Lengar and Camabin. All three have various problems.
Saban is a coward and both Camabin and Lengar(to varying degrees) are nuts. The story goes very well untill half way through the book. Then it seems to suffer from Steven King syndrom and rush the rest of the way through, so in the end what you get is a really lackluster book. However that does not take away from the good battles you can always count on Cornwell to give you.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Too long!, June 24 2003
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
I thought the book was good but it went in great lengths and I felt that there was little character development.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, Aug. 30 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Stonehenge (Paperback)
A wonderfully written book. Full of mystery, suspense, whatnot. A wonderful book by a great author. Not boring at all. You really should read it.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Love Cornwell but Hate this Book, Nov. 6 2001
By A Customer
I was so excited when I saw this new book by Cornwell...and then I started reading it. The story is long and boring and never seems to reach a climax. They move rocks, then move them some more, then there is a bit of a story about the brothers, their lovers, and their gods, then the rocks go a little farther. It seemed Cornwell was trying to address too many avenues in the story without focusing well on any one point. I still haven't been able to finish it unlike the Warlord Chronicles that I couldn't stop reading.
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2.0 out of 5 stars I Think I Have Found Cornwell's Worst Novel., Sept. 6 2001
By 
"p_trabaris" (Naperville, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
"Stonehenge" by Bernard Cornwell is a complete departure for the author of the Sharpe series. Frankly, I didn't like it very much. Maybe it was the pacing, which was slow or the character development, which was shallow. I never got the sense or feel of the times. Luckily for me I picked the book up at a bargain otherwise I would have felt cheated. I finished it only because Cornwell is one of my favorite authors.
Perhaps it is because I couldn't identify with the main characters. The lead characters are brothers, namely Saban, Camaban and Lengar. Saban the protagonist, is the perpetually young warrior, hero and builder. Saban's crippled brother Camaban, is the tribe's sorcerer, kook and priest. Saban's oldest brother Lengar, is the obligatory antagonist, villain and tribal chieftain. None of these characters are interesting, all of them seem merely to be props to tell the story. I can accept this type of fiction by some other authors, especially when used in short stories but here it seems shallow. I don't think Cornwell allowed the readers a chance to get into the heads of these people.
I think most people knew it took Britain's Neolithic inhabitants years and years to build Stonehenge. After all they barely seem to master fire, metal tools and planting crops. But I thought the story could have been much more interesting and exciting. Cornwell paints a picture of people who were brutal war-like savages. They applied blue tattoo scars to their bodies to signify the number of people they have killed. Ordinarily Cornwell is the perfect author for this type of job, all of his other works are great but he never carries it off.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Amazing Tale of Determination and Wonder, Aug. 17 2001
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
Over 20 years ago I fulfilled a long-time dream by standing before the giant and ancient monument known as Stonehenge. Like everyone else who stood there, I marveled at the minds and determination of the men and women who must have struggled against the elements as they overcame the limitations of their ancient times to build this structure. Like anyone else, I wondered how they were able to do it and why they took on this task.
"Stonehenge" is a novel and does not pretend to be fact. In his historical notes, Cornwell makes it clear that no one really knows who or why it was built, and there are only clues as to how. He points out that future scientists may very well look at our cathedrals and draw conclusions about our own culture and beliefs that are as likely to be wrong as right. However, that is not important here.
Cornwell has constructed a tight and fascinating story that tells maybe why and maybe how Stonehenge came to be. The story centers on three half-brothers, two of them doomed to death at the hands of their siblings, the women who loved and hated them, warriors, priests, and a pantheon of gods and goddesses, not physically part of the story, but whose presence, real or imagined, drives the characters on. I cannot think of one character that wasn't well drawn or who acted against their nature in this story. Even though so many of the events in the story deal with the reaction to the mythology (a term meaning someone else's religion) of the characters, I never once felt that their actions or beliefs were too farfetched. They were each people of their times, not modernized versions of ancient people.
Stonehenge is exceptional. Anyone who likes historical fiction, especially as it deals with the ancient world, will love it. Also, anyone who likes action packed adventure stories, tales of heroes, tales that delve into the behavior of characters, or just want to pass the time on the plane, train, or bus, should move this to the top of their must read list.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Starts good but ends poorly, July 6 2001
By 
Blah (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
The book starts off great. The first two hundred pages with its explanation of the tribe and the brothers who are the chiefs sons are truly engrossing. Unfortunately it tapers off from there. About the time you hit page 300 the book is basically over. the author however decides to babble for abouta hundred pages or so before he finally ties up some loose ends. Another disappointment is the protagonist, Saban, who starts out likeable enough but ends up being somewhat annoying and weak. His counterparts his wives, his war chief brother and his club footed brother are far more interesting characters.
While Cornwell's explanation of Stonehenges purpose is nothing out of the ordinary his description of its possible use is quite interesting. The best part about the book is the imaginary mythology that Cornwell has created for the tribe and their worship of sundry deity. For example, in the novel the tribe takes their dead (and there are many) to the death place where they allow the body to be consumed by vultures and other birds. Students of religion will recognize this as a Zorastrian custom, that began in Iran about 3000 BC.
All in all the book is not too bad but on the other hand it really isn't all that good either.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not Cornwell's Best, June 17 2001
I was very excited when this book came out because I was thoroughly enchanted by the Warlord Chronicles. Unfortunately this book was not on par with that trilogy. Cornwell doesn't do a necessarily bad job with this book, but the excitement level wans at times, and I found myself skipping through parts quite often. If you have time and money to waste and no better options in sight Stonehenge is enjoyable enough. Just don't go in with expectations for stories like the ones in the Warlord Chronicles.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Unlike the Builders of Stonehenge, this Misses the Mark, May 18 2001
By 
Kate (Hermitage, TN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Stonehenge (Mass Market Paperback)
I have never read anything by Bernard Cornwell, and eagerly picked this up hoping for another _Pillars of the Earth_ or _Sarum_. Unfortunately, this book echoes those only in the broadest sense. Like those books, this features human drama set against great erections in England. Unlike those books, this one did not seem well-researched or relevant. Cornwell, by setting this book in prehistory, has the luxury of creating his own mythology. This leaves him free to do as little research as possible while still writing what seems to hope to be a weighty tome. The one feature that is unchanging--the topography--is only referenced in the endnote acknowledgements. I do not profess to know anything about Stonehenge, and thus felt disappointed by being unable to place the oft-mentioned landmarks in any type of context. The story of the brothers is interesting at points and tiresome at others. All in all, I left this book disappointed.
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Stonehenge: A Novel
Stonehenge: A Novel by Bernard Cornwell (Paperback - Dec 21 2004)
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