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5.0 out of 5 stars A Christmas Eve's Novel
I must say this is one of my favorite Discword Books, ranking among Interesting Time, The Last Continent, The Science of Discword and The Fifth Elephant. As you'd probalbly read the editorial reviews, I wont repeat the story twice for your sakes. If you haven't read them yet, you should have.
My personal favorite parts are the ones that concerned the wizard of Unseen...
Published on April 11 2002 by Paarko Seitaar

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars great story, misprinted book
the story itself is amazing, but my copy was misprinted and 50 pages were missing. i actually had to get another copy, which was annoying.
Published 1 month ago by Alex


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5.0 out of 5 stars A Christmas Eve's Novel, April 11 2002
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
I must say this is one of my favorite Discword Books, ranking among Interesting Time, The Last Continent, The Science of Discword and The Fifth Elephant. As you'd probalbly read the editorial reviews, I wont repeat the story twice for your sakes. If you haven't read them yet, you should have.
My personal favorite parts are the ones that concerned the wizard of Unseen University, the masters of dynamic inactivity. Having their Hogswatchnight feast being disrupted by the sudden appearance of things they utter (e.g. They joked about the Tooth fairy,and then suddenly: guess who appears?) Another interesting piece is when the wizards decided to wait for the Hogfather in the dark and fearful UU Library. When Archancellor Mustrum Ridcully wonders about whether the Librarian(an orangutan by the way) will recieve his gifts before us humans. Ponder Stibbons' immediate response is to agree with him on account of the theory of evolution. Ridcully's bitter reply is:"I just thought that because, aphabetically, apes come before man." And they sure do.
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5.0 out of 5 stars COWER BRIEF MORTALS - HO HO HO, Dec 14 2001
By 
Megan R McConnell (CHERMSIDE SOUTH, QLD Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
So what happens when the Hogfather dissapears from the Discworld?
Terry Pratchett answers this in this great book that will really make you think about what you belive in.
Visit with your favorite Discworld characters during Hogswatch - and see the reaction when Death (as the Hogfather) visits a department store. Find out how Susan deals with monsters (not the POKER!) and just what to give Hex for christmas.
Hogfather is very fast-paced and takes all the cliches of christmas and puts a spin on them as Death looks at them from his own special point of view.
Terry Pratchett is not only a very funny writer, he also has the knack of making you think - when you don't even realise you are doing it. This book contains very subtle insights - that you will find yourself realising only later how important and profound they actually are. He also pokes a sly dig at the X-Files (if you read carefully and don't miss any footnotes, you will find it).
For those lovers of Hex - the Discworld's only computer - you will be pleased to find he has a large role in this - and we watch as Ridcully and Death become computer literate: in their own individual ways.
I loved this book - and I know that you will as well. It's a great read not just for lovers of Terry Pratchett, but for those who want to re-discover the real meaning of christmas.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Discworld - that says it all!, Nov. 11 2001
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This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is a bit different than the rest of the discworld series, it starts when the leader of the assassins guild gets contracted (by some mysterious entities) to make the Hogfather "vanish". The Hogfather is Discworld's equivalent of Santa, and Hogwatch is the extremely similar version of Christmas. The next thing we see in the book is Death (yes, Discworld's lovable Grim Reaper) acting instead of the Hogfather, that is, going from house to house to fill up stockings, putting little boys on his lap and saying Ho Ho Ho. The rest of the book kind of reads like a mystery novel: how did this happen? why does Death fill up for the Hogfather? I was very immersed in the book, and couldn't wait till the conclusion.

As usual, the result is very witty and is truly hilarious. Towards the rest of the book it became more serious and philosophical, which added another layer of depth to the book. The same ideas which underly "Hogfather" also appear in "Small Gods", and partially in "Pyramids". The fact that the Discworld series always have such an insight into many aspects of being human has always been one of the factors which makes it much more than just a regular fantasy/humor series (a la Piers Anthony), and that's why "Hogfather" is such a great book.

If you love the Discworld (or even if you just "like" it), this book is really for you.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful on human faith, but funny!, July 29 2001
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
Pratchett has a talent for witty humour and I have trouble not laughing out loud whilst reading his books. Though not as good as some of Pratchett's other books, Hogfather has a deep sense of balance of human faith and belief -- take something away from us and we will naturally fill the gap.
True to form, this book contains the inefficient wizards at the Unseen University who don't recognize evil even when it turns up at their hogswatch night dinner.
Our heroine, Susan, has to face up to the fact that she is Death's grandaughter and against her will finds herself snared into action. She is accompanied by a raven, who consistently mistakes grapes and other items for eyeballs, and the Death of Rats.
Death himself has gone loopy. He's literally sick to death of being Death and takes the place of the Hogfather who has gone mysteriously missing. Some hilarious scenes play out as Death, dressed up with red hat and cloak and fake white beard, fumbles to reinstall children's faith in the Hogfather. Hogswatch in the style of Death ...
And how does the Toothfairy fit in the picture? Well, to find that out you need to read the book. I don't want to spoil the surprise!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A darkly, beautiful story with an important message!, June 8 2001
By 
JJM Peters (Nijmegen, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
Who would've thought, after reading the first few books of Terry Pratchett that this writer would one day produce a book with such depth as this one? Okay, as always it's all wrapped up in a high speed, intricate story with several sub-plots, but that makes the ultimate message Pratchett delivers only more convincing.
So, what's the story all about? As always, the Discworld is in perilous danger, or at least civilization on it is. The "Auditors" (of reality, not money) want to eliminate mankind. Since these beings like everything to be orderly, precise and regular, it's not hard to imagine mankind is a thorn in the eye to them. The way they plan to wipe mankind of the disc is by murdering the Hogfather (Discworlds equivalent of Santaclaus), a job assigned to the less than sane assassin Teatime. DEATH, the only one who understands the danger mankind is in, can't help himself and interferes by impersonating the Hogfather. Meanwhile his granddaughter Susan sets out to stop Teatime (with a little dubious help from the Oh-God of Hangovers). Of course, in the end all's well, but not before Pratchett makes a very keen observation of what defines humanity. Believing in certain 'lies' (like the existence of a Hogfather) is, according to Death (the only truly impartial observer) what makes us human.
I've read the book three times now and I'm still surprised how well Pratchett builds his story and every time I marvel at the insights he shows in what humans are like. It's a very special book, with something for everybody and I really recommend it not only to Pratchett fans.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Dark Side of PTerry, Jan. 27 2001
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
The release of this book evoked some distress among Terry Pratchett fans. Expecting another City Watch or Rincewind book, this pre-Christmas issue took most by surprise. Initial reactions were muted praise at best. Over time, more readers came to understand that this book introduced a new aspect of PTerry's thinking and writing. After a string of hilarious fantasies featuring Rincewind or the Wyrd Sisters, he presented here an unexpected dark side.
The story itself is almost simplistic, although classic Pratchett. The Auditors, who elsewhere attempted to give Death the sack, have decided that Hogswatch Night is a source of cosmic disorder. Contracting with the Assassin's Guild to have the Hogfather "brought to an end", they unleash a disturbing series of events. And cause Pratchett to introduce the first truly evil character in the Discworld series.
No-one likes the Patrician. But his job isn't designed for popularity contests. Ipslore cheats death to have revenge on his fellow wizards, but overzealous parents are no novelty. Mister Teatime [pronounced "Teh-ah-tim-eh"], however, is a real departure from Pratchett villains. He is consummately evil, cleverly choosing the most vulnerable segment of society in his attempt to control all the Discworld. This is the first truly repulsive character Pratchett's created. Reading Hogfather makes you wonder: is there a real-life model for this character, or has PTerry created him wholly? If the first, we must find and destroy him/her. If the latter, there's a terribly dark place in Pratchett's psyche and we have to wonder what else is in there.
The irony of Death substituting for the missing Hogfather is pure Pterry. Death's ongoing struggle to understand humans is vividly presented in this novel. He replaces a department store Hogfather in one of the most hilarious scenes in Discworld literature. Pratchett also responds to the rising tide of feminists by raising Susan Sto-Helit from near obscurity. She is destined to become a leading figure in the Discworld series. Her raven associate is almost as cynical as Gaspode the Communicating Canine. Pratchett uses these characters to demolish the more fervently held myths we hold dear. With a finesse other writers must envy, Pratchett uses the Discworld to mirror our own - the motto he's given us often. From a hesitant acceptance of this book as "another Discworld novel", Hogfather has become one of the leading examples of Pratchett's expressive talent. It's worthy of a second read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars If you haven't got a ha'penny..., April 11 2000
By 
Dianna Deeley (San Francisco,, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
I read this back in November and didn't even mind a really long commuter train delay. My neighbors may have, although most of them seemed to smile as I snickered, giggled and guffawed my way through it. When I went home for Christmas, I pressed it on my mother, and, when she complained that her eyes hurt too much for the tiny print, I read parts of it aloud. Fortunately, my mother shares my sense of humor.
I think this is the funniest of Pratchett's books. To be sure, someone else can disagree, and that's not a bad thing. Pratchett's eye for the ridiculous is sharp, but he stays reasonably charitable which makes a nice change. Best of all, Pratchett never forgets that a satire works best if it has a story of its own to hang on. That's a point all too often forgotten by people who think they're writing satire.
Just because I can't resist, I'll hint at my favorite passage: "IT'S NOT MEANT TO BE SAFE." If you haven't already read the book, that's the point where I couldn't stop laughing, and never mind that one lady looked quite ready to summon the security people!
Like Gibbon, Pratchett lives a good deal of his life in his footnotes, acerbic enough to appeal to my somewhat jaundiced view of humanity. He thinks a lot of people are idiots, and it's a good thing the world has got so well padded. For some, it could get even better padded...
Christmas, even crass and commercialized, is a good thing, and Pratchett remembers that. This book is great.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Would rate six or more stars, if I could, Dec 7 1999
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
Probably the best book Pratchett has ever written (but then, I would give »Lords and Ladies« a bad credit). To give some arguments: The plot is great because of a) the characters, led by Susan, Death (going HO, HO, HO), the Death of Rats (going HEEK, HEEK, HEEK), Ridcully the Brown and the Oh God of Hangovers; b) the villain, which is Mr. Jonathan Teatime, who has a mind like a mirror crack'd: Lots of brilliant and beautiful facettes, but nevertheless something that's broken; and c)the plot itself, which is a thrilling whodunit, because though you know who had it done and who did it, you don't know How or, even more important, WHY. The resolution ... I won't tell you, but it's brilliant (like Mr. Teatime's brain?). Read this book. Read it again. At least each year when christmas is drawing near. Then think about the sun, and blood in the snow, and an assassin with a eyeball of glass ...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good, Dec 26 1999
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
Terry Pratchett is one of the only authors alive today who can still get away with writting an entire novel to make a single point. This is the first Discworld novel I read (but not the first Terry Pratchett novel)--my friend happened to have it with him when we were discussing books--and it has inspired me to read the rest of the collection. Some might say that the 21st novel is not the best place to start, but it seemed to work for me. I've read it twice, because Terry Pratchett is one of those authors where you have to. The first time, you read through it fast just to see how he ends it, and then you read through it again to find all the little things that you missed the first time because you read through it too fast. I recommend this book to anyone who's bored with the carbon copy, cookie-cutter novels that flood todays market, because this is definetely not one of them.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Seems the most heartfelt... Maybe I'm too sentimental, Sept. 6 2001
By 
Mina (Champaign, IL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hogfather (Mass Market Paperback)
I think this is my favorite of the Discworld novels, although "The Fifth Elephant," "Small Gods," and any other Vimes novel are also high contenders. "Hogfather" gets points for its poignancy, its interesting insights into human belief, and of course the hysterical scenes with Unseen University's bungling high wizards.
I don't want to give anything away, but Pratchett's visions of the mind's eye of childhood and the things that terrify you when you're young are brilliant. The assorted gods, fairies and gnomes that fall into existence when the Hogfather goes missing are wonderful and crazy characters, and of course, any book with Death as a primary character is always a great read.
All in all, I loved this book. Loved it, loved it, loved it. I admit, it had me in tears at the end. BUY THIS NOW. You won't regret it.
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