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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too
Tristran Thorn would do absolutely anything to win pretty Victoria Forrester's heart. Even venture across The Wall into mysterious Faerie in search of a fallen star.

But once he enters Faerie, strange things begin to happen.

Tristran knows the location of every place in the land. He meets a strange, small man who gives him a candle that allows him to...
Published on Jan. 11 2008 by TeensReadToo

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3.0 out of 5 stars A good adult fairy tale, but I was hoping for more
Stardust by Neil Gaiman is an adult fairy tale that took some time to get into. Overall, it was an enjoyable book that is written so beautifully and has a great but very sad ending (might not be sad for everyone)! I did feel distant from the characters, maybe because there were a couple of storylines going on in this short story since there were many people after the...
Published on Nov. 15 2008 by Sam


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, Jan. 11 2008
Tristran Thorn would do absolutely anything to win pretty Victoria Forrester's heart. Even venture across The Wall into mysterious Faerie in search of a fallen star.

But once he enters Faerie, strange things begin to happen.

Tristran knows the location of every place in the land. He meets a strange, small man who gives him a candle that allows him to travel great distances. And when he finally finds the fallen star, Tristran discovers that it is not a lump of rock like he thought, but a young woman, who has quite the mind of her own.

Tristran, though, isn't the only one looking for the star. The witch queen and a group of three brothers all want something of it. For these brothers, it's the power she possesses. For the witch, it's her heart.

STARDUST was completely entrancing, charming, and a surprisingly quick read. The star's spunk and Tristran's humanity are both to be admired in this adventurous tale that will make you laugh out loud and break into tears. This is one book not to be missed.

Reviewed by: The Compulsive Reader
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Neil Gaiman’s best, March 11 2006
By 
Hugo Trepanier "elusiveone_96" (Deux-Montagnes, QC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Stardust (Mass Market Paperback)
I was drawn to Stardust after enjoying several other books by Neil Gaiman, especially American Gods and Good Omens, among others. Recently I looked through my library for something new I hadn’t read before and decided to pick up Stardust. From the first few paragraphs, I was immediately hooked and it became very difficult to stop reading this truly fantastic tale!
The strange thing about this book is that it doesn’t entirely feel like a Gaiman novel in that it is much less gritty than his other works, though it retains all the charm, fantasy and other wonderful qualities. What I liked best is that it has a sort of dreamy aspect with all the magic, strange creatures and unusual situations, and yet it remains very suitable for adults. It does contain a bit of sex and a fair amount of violence, though overall it gave me a feeling of well being throughout. As usual, Gaiman has a rich vocabulary that evokes magnificent images while keeping everything simple.
There is no need to summarize the story in this review; all you really need to know is that if you liked any of Neil Gaiman’s other novels and are into fantasy, you will love this book. It is simply beautiful, without a doubt among the author’s best works to date.
Highly recommended, 5/5.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Stardust, April 5 2014
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This review is from: Stardust (Kindle Edition)
I saw the movie first, then wanted to read the book. Very good book. Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite authors.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful., Jan. 25 2014
This review is from: Stardust (Kindle Edition)
Picked me up and whisked me away rather beautifully. I shall be back for more of Gaimans wondrous writings. Soon.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Stardust review, Jan. 7 2014
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This review is from: Stardust (Kindle Edition)
Really liked the prose of the book. The story is very close to the movie but near the end. Good kid book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, Dec 20 2013
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This review is from: Stardust (Kindle Edition)
A wondrous adventure in fantasy land
Interesting read and a vivid imagination that keeps you wondering what will happen next
Well worth reading
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Beautiful, Dec 30 2012
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I am a new Neil Gaiman fan and had tried to read this sometime a few years ago. I started this book the other day and it was lovely, the artwork complements Gaiman's writing and makes it all the more. The cover is just lovely and is stunning to look at. As this wouldn't be the first book I would recommend to a new reader (seeing as it is a bit more advanced) it would be perfect for the avid reader.
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4.0 out of 5 stars great Adult Fairy Tale, June 3 2012
This review is from: Stardust (Paperback)
Tristran Thorn is a young man who lives on a farm in the English countryside. He is besotted with Victoria Forester who promises to marry him if he brings her a falling star. Thorn's village, Wall has a gap where he can enter the world of his mother, a faerie.

Thorn goes on a quest to bring back the falling star. This starts the most amazing adventure involving faeries, pixies and gnomes, unicorns, witches and ships that sail in the nighttime sky.

This is a easy wonderful fantasy read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good adult fairy tale, but I was hoping for more, Nov. 15 2008
By 
Sam (British Columbia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Stardust (Paperback)
Stardust by Neil Gaiman is an adult fairy tale that took some time to get into. Overall, it was an enjoyable book that is written so beautifully and has a great but very sad ending (might not be sad for everyone)! I did feel distant from the characters, maybe because there were a couple of storylines going on in this short story since there were many people after the star: Tristan, the three lords after the power Stormhold, and a witch. However, that may have been a good thing, because I would not feel greatly upset if something bad happened to the characters.

The story mainly revolved around Tristan Thorn, who is so in love with Victoria Forester that he would do anything to win her heart when she refuses to kiss him. Victoria tells him that she would do anything he desired if he brought back the shooting star that they just saw that night. Happily, Tristan obeys. He enters beyond the wall that is gaurds Wall, into Faerie, which does not follow the same rules as Wall does, and nothing is as he imagined.

I do hope that Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman is even more enjoyable than Stardust.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Once you have seen the movie should you read the book? You bet., Aug. 22 2007
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I would be one of those people who checked out Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess' "Stardust: Being a Romance Within the Realms of Faerie" because they really enjoyed the movie "Stardust." When I went to my local comic book store to pick up this week's comics I notice they had this elegant hardback edition of "Stardust," which I took to be a sign that I should pick it up instead of trying to track down all of the issues on eBay. So each night since seeing the movie I have been reading a couple of chapters of the book before turning out the lights, because it seemed the sort of thing that should be read in bed (actually, it seems like it should be read to somebody, but then the narrative flow of Gaiman's text would be broken up every time you had to show the person who was being read to the illustrations by Vess).

One of the nice things about reading the book after seeing the movie, instead of the other way around, is that instead of bemoaning what has been altered, added or deleted you get to enjoy seeing the entire world of Faerie envisioned by Gaiman and illustrated by Vess. As soon as you start reading Chapter 1, "In Which We Learn of the Village of Wall, and of the Curious Thing That Occurs There Every Nine Years," you are aware of the differences, because Dunstan Thorn does not have to sneak past the two guards (not one) that guard the gap in the wall in order to meet the personal slave of the witch-woman who owns the stall where flowers are sold. So there are myriad differences between the book and the movie revealed in each and every chapter.

In fact, many of the things that I liked most about the movie are not in the book. That is not to say or even to suggest that this is a bad thing, because movies and illustrated novels (which is what this book is and not a comic book) have decidedly different approaches when it comes to what is visually important. The big moment in the movie was exactly what I wanted to be (indeed, I had turned to my wife and whispered that I wondered what would happen if the fallen star got really, really happy), and what happens in the original story is radically different but equally appropriate to the path that Gaiman and Vess had stacked out for their characters.

The inevitable question would be which is better, the novel or the movie, but everybody knows what the answer to that question usually is in such cases. However, what is important is that those who enjoy one should be able to enjoy the other. If you have seen the movie and liked it, then you should check out the book. If you have read the book, or the original comic books, then you should go see the movie. There will be those who will be disappointed by one given the other, and some will be touched or moved by either, but that is their loss.

My familiarity with Gaiman's work has been pretty spotty. I have only seen a couple of issues of "The Sandman," a couple of years into the telling of the tale, so I could not really appreciate what was going on. But I have read his novel "American Gods" and his alternative history comic book series "Marvel 1602." "Stardust" is different from those other works, but you can get a sense of how this is just another corner of Gaiman's imagination. Equally important are the illustrations by Vess, because they help reinforce the idea that even if it is set during the time of young Queen Victoria in the land across the pond that this is indeed a faerie tale. If anything, both the book and the movie reminds us of what that means.
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Stardust
Stardust by Neil Gaiman (Paperback - Dec 15 2008)
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