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67 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER IS FOR ADULTS!!!
If you are new to this series, especially if you are going to read it to a child, DO NOT READ THEM IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER! A child will lose interest after a few chapters. Few great stories are told strictly in chronological order and the hook for Narnia is "The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe".
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Published on July 14 2004 by nathan dodd

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Confusing to some children
I first read "The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe" when I was a child. I loved the book, and soon read the others in the series. I also watched the BBC television series. I still adore this series of books. However, when I was a child I remember being more frightened by Aslan than by many of the bad or evil characters. I could not understand how he could be...
Published on Nov. 20 2001 by Nikki


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2.0 out of 5 stars Too small for young readers, March 22 2014
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This review is from: Chronicles of Narnia Box Set (Paperback)
Too small for young readers and the illustrations (few) are not so appealing to them, either. I suppose this was meant for more mature readers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!, Dec 2 2013
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Great writing style, wonderful sense of humour, amazing, deep content. Suits all ages. All novels in one book make it very convenient!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An extra set of these extrardinary books !, Nov. 17 2013
By 
S. Meyer "suzanna meyer" (Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Chronicles of Narnia Box Set (Paperback)
Oops,I ordered an extra set,my mistake !But I will use it as a Christmas gift !Far bettr than any toy !!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good series to read bit distorted, Oct. 1 2013
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This review is from: Chronicles of Narnia Box Set (Paperback)
Not bad my favourite so far would be book 1 the magicians nephew and I'm on book 3 a boy and his horse witch I sent bad but not my fav don't have lots of time to read right now. Also a bit distorted of the original original series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An amazing childrens book, Oct. 29 2001
By 
"sganapati" (Portland, OR USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Chronicles of Narnia Box Set (Paperback)
CS Lewis has woven a masterpeice with this series. Re-reading this series has brung back memories of when i was in forth grade and addicted to these books, which take place during WWII. A must read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Magician's Nephew, May 21 2001
By 
Pio (SF, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Chronicles of Narnia Box Set (Paperback)
This book was nice and entertaining. The Naria book was about the begining of Naria, and how it came to be. This book is rated 4 stars, compared to my favorite Naria book: The lion, the witch and the wardrobe. I thought the book was nice, so I rated it 4 stars. I would recomend htis book to anybody who just likes to read, which is not me!
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5.0 out of 5 stars For action and adventure, the C.O.N won't let you down!, June 10 1998
By A Customer
The seven books which make up the Chronicles of Narnia (1.Magicians Newphew, 2.Lion Witch & Wardrobe, 3.The Horse and His Boy, 4.Prince Caspian, 5.Voyage of the Dawn Treader, 6.Silver Chair and finally 7.Last Battle) are packed with imagination, action, adventure and suspense. Each book can be read as an individual story, but to truly appreciate the whole picture I would read all seven Chronicles. There are seven children in total who find themselves going to Narnia in very different situations. But in all cases, it is a magical trip. In this series you will witness Narnia and its talking animals being created, fly on a winged horse, see a young boy get "un-dragoned", sail on a ship to far off destinations, and of course ride on the Lion's back. I would recommend these books to any child between the ages of 8 - 101. C.S. Lewis has a wonderful way of capturing the attention of adults even in his children's books. ><> ><> ><>
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A delightful way to visit (or revisit) the land of Narnia!!, Nov. 8 2003
By 
Carla (Genoa Township, MI) - See all my reviews
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I loved the Narnia series as a child and bought this for my children (ages 5 and 9) as an introduction, hoping they would eventually want to read the books, and wanting to keep them occupied on a long car trip. We were hooked from the beginning! We ended up carrying the CD's from the car to the house and back again - unable to "put them down." The actors did a wonderful job of bringing the characters to life and the narration filled in the gaps perfectly. I was worried when I purchased this set that time considerations would force the producers to leave bits of the book out - not so! I would recommend this audio series for anyone - whether they be a Chronicles of Naria fan or not - though some of it may be a little scary for very young children. A radio production is so much more enjoyable to listen to than a book being read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into Narnia, Feb. 22 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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In the first half of the twentieth century, two drinking buddies wrote vastly different fantasy series -- one was the classic "Lord of the Rings," and the other was the "Narnia" series. A close pal of J.R.R. Tolkien's and a fellow "Inkling," C.S. Lewis was one of the first widely-read fantasy writers, and his books are still widely read and enjoyed by children and adults alike.

"The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" opens as four children (Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter) are being shipped to the English countryside at the beginning of World War II. While exploring the vast house where they are staying, Lucy accidently ventures into a winter-locked world called Narnia, which is ruled over by the evil White Witch. The king Aslan is about to return -- but the Witch quickly gets a hold on Edmund's soul.

"Prince Caspian" takes place long after the events of "Lion" (though in our world, only a short time has passed). Young Prince Caspian escapes his uncle's castle when his life is threatened, and he finds refuge with the hidden races of Narnia -- dwarves, talking animals, dryads, centaurs and many others. And to help Caspian regain the throne, the two kings and two queens of Narnia are called back...

"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" begins when Edmund, Lucy and their obnoxious cousin Eustace are sucked through a painting into Narnia, where their pal Caspian is now king of Narnia (and an adult to boot). Caspian is heading toward the end of the world to find several knights who were banished, and vanished into the perilous islands along the sea.

"The Silver Chair" heads into slightly darker territory when Eustace returns to boarding school. He and outcast girl Jill Pole are drawn into Narnia, where Jill must perform a task to redeem herself for a stupid act. She must find the dying Caspian's son Rilian, who vanished many years before. The search will send the two children across Narnia with the pessimistic Puddleglum, to carnivorous Giants, creepy underground creatures, and an enemy worse than they could have imagined...

"Horse and His Boy" shoots back in time to the middle of "Lion." Shasta lives with the man he thinks to be his father in a hovel by the sea, but when a Calormene warrior purchases him, he escapes with the man's talking horse, Bree. He meets the escaping noblewoman Aravis (who also has a talking horse), and the two are planning to escape to Narnia and freedom. But in the capital city, there is a conspiracy brewing against the visiting Narnian kings and queens...

"Magician's Nephew" clears up many of the questions about Narnia, Aslan and the White Witch. Digory and Polly end up in very serious trouble when they encounter Digory's weird, slightly nutty uncle, a magician who has created magical rings that send the user to other worlds. The two kids end up in the "wood between the worlds," and venture into a dying land where they set loose the evil Queen Jadis -- who follows them to the newborn world of Narnia.

"The Last Battle" is definitely the end of the series, where Narnia decays slowly into the final battle between good and evil. Humans are destroying the trees and killing the dryads, and a false Aslan is appearing to mislead the inhabitants of Narnia. Old and new friends will band together as the true Aslan prepares to lead them to a new land.

If you don't like allegory (religious or otherwise), then steer clear of the Chronicles. While Lewis's beliefs are presented in a more complicated and subtle manner in his other fictional works, here the parallels to basic Christian beliefs are very obvious. Reportedly even Tolkien, one of Lewis's best pals, found the allegory annoying.

But if you can get past the slightly ham-handed treatment, it's a fantastic read. Lewis reshapes typical mythical elements like dwarves, nymphs, talking animals, centaurs and wicked witches into shape in his invented world. And Narnia is an inviting place -- it isn't always fun or pleasant, but there is always the feeling that the good guys will ultimately -- if not immediately -- come out on top.

Lewis's writing can become a bit precious at times, in the tradition of many British authors writing for children. But he puts plenty of detail and mystery in his stories, sprinkling them with little mysteries and questions that are explained as the story goes on. Where did the lamppost come from, for example?

Now, enough with the story. I was able to see this edition on bookshelves a bit before its official release, and it's a gorgeous edition -- well-made, good extras from "Beyond the Wardrobe" that add a bit of depth to the story, and a map illustrated by Pauline Baynes (the artist who drew the charming pen-and-ink illustrations for the actual series).

While not quite as well known as his pal Tolkien's work, C.S. Lewis's Narnia series still a fun and dramatic fantasy story. For a bit more insight into the origins of fantasy as we know it, check out "The Chronicles of Narnia."
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent production, June 26 2004
Radio Theatre has set a standard for itself and meets it in spades with The Chronicles of Narnia. The cast is solid and gives a wonderful dramatization. The Horse and His Boy is our favorite, and it is best to listen to at night while you are traveling in the car, because the characters travel at night alot during the story -- of course, they are not in a car, they are on horseback.
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Chronicles of Narnia Box Set
Chronicles of Narnia Box Set by C S Lewis (Paperback - July 8 1994)
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