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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The real story in presenting
I teach courses in business writing, including lessons on presentations. When students ask for good books to continue learning, this is the book I recommend for presentations. I also suggest that it will help them with all of their communications at work. The ideas in the book are simple yet powerful. For example, the most important communications we do at work is...
Published on April 13 2004 by Joseph Judge

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3.0 out of 5 stars It seems having no typos isn't one of the deadly sins
Its a good book, but full of typos. Excessive typos creates will a subconscious skepticism of the credibility of the author while reading. It's ironic that a book on effective presentation contains so many typos, I would say more than I can will remember from any book at from a major publisher.
(The typos above were intended.)
Published on Feb. 28 2004


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The real story in presenting, April 13 2004
By 
Joseph Judge (Harrisburg, PA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
I teach courses in business writing, including lessons on presentations. When students ask for good books to continue learning, this is the book I recommend for presentations. I also suggest that it will help them with all of their communications at work. The ideas in the book are simple yet powerful. For example, the most important communications we do at work is convincing others, and a powerful way to do that is to tell them a story. It is fundamental human nature that storytelling awakens, relaxes, and engages those who are listening.
Unfortunately, the editing and packaging of the book are not as well done as is the presentation of the main ideas. The author has had one audience for years: entrepreneurs who are trying to convince bankers to back their IPOs. The publisher tried to take his ideas and make them applicable and accessible to all business people everywhere. They did not quite succeed, for a variety of reasons.
The text uses vocabulary and figures of speech that exclude those who are not older, male, American, entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley. It uses basic words (graphics, verbal) in ways I found confusing. It has errors in grammar and punctuation, as well as inconsistent ways of presenting material. The book includes an unnecessary color insert. The end of the book received much less editorial attention than did the beginning of the book. As I read the first parts of the book, I was usually smiling and saying, "Ah hah!" As I read the latter parts of the book I found myself occasionally frowning and asking, "Huh?" And the whole book is replete with intrusive "sideboxes" that repeat parts of the text. I find this distracting and insulting. I know publishers love them, but I think their reasons for using them have more to do with "doing what everyone else is doing" than with proven efficacy for the intended audience. Overall I would say it's an adequate first draft of an excellent book.
The usefulness of the ideas in this book almost justifies giving it a rating of 5 stars. The price is good, too. But an adjustment is necessary due to the audience bias, lackluster editing, and obtuse publishing. Despite all this, it is a very useful book on real-world business communication.
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5.0 out of 5 stars It's really presenting to win, July 19 2004
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
You may be a skilled presentator, but your so called "support material" may be working against you. I give presentations almost every day since I work as a consultant and the audience response is better since I started following the book's advise. The book's writting is easy to understand and can be read very fast. The advice the author gives is easy to follow and it translates into achievements in real life. This book should be required reading for everybody in college, I'm giving it to the personnel under me as required reading. It's a great book. It has some typos and as verything it could be improved, but it's a great book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Real information you can use!, May 24 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
I purchased this book after the executives of my company raved about Jerry Weissman's work in helping them prepare for our IPO. Unlike many other books on this topic, I found it to be very useful because it provided a framework that was simple yet creative. The real-world examples he uses are great and they make it a more interesting read for those of us who enjoy learning more about the techniques used by successful people. Jerry is starting to conduct public seminars in the Bay Area but if you can't make it to a seminar, the book is a great alternative.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Packed with Knowledge!, May 19 2004
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
The lessons in this excellent book should be studied and applied by everyone who has to give presentations. In terms of audience connection and persuasive technique, Abe Lincoln must have known everything here (except, perhaps, the details of PowerPoint). And that's good, because you don't need anything new or fancy to give a great presentation, you just need a message and clear instructions on how to deliver it - so, here they are. The book is cleanly written with pop-out boxes, sample graphics and corporate examples. Anyone who ignores its powerful basic rules will fail at presenting. Failure means boring the audience and leaving them unconvinced and unwilling to hear more. This is your cure for those blues. The book's flaw is the author's tedious self-promotion, but he's a former TV guy, so what the heck do you expect? The bottom line, we attest, is that what he says, you need to know.
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3.0 out of 5 stars It seems having no typos isn't one of the deadly sins, Feb. 28 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
Its a good book, but full of typos. Excessive typos creates will a subconscious skepticism of the credibility of the author while reading. It's ironic that a book on effective presentation contains so many typos, I would say more than I can will remember from any book at from a major publisher.
(The typos above were intended.)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent information, Jan. 18 2004
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
With a solid four pages or so of favourable reviews within the book itself, it's fair to say that this book has been well received.
The difference between presenting a message and getting your message across is powerfully demonstrated within this book. Plenty of examples of presentations getting a workover and numerous lessons on how to achieve a higer level of communication with your presentations is well covered bu Weissman.
If only this was given away with every copy of MS Powerpoint the world would be a much better (and less boring) place.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hits the Mark, Dec 19 2003
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
About 99% of presentations I have been given violate all of the principles espoused in this book. Most people are thinking that more is better and that creativity is unbusiness-like.
This book offers compelling perspective from a person whose background was in television entertainment, and who developed his perspectives through IPO roadshow presentations. If there is one message from this book, it is that your presentations should be Presenter Focused. This requires one to think through the organization, purpose and crafting of the presentation. In This book outlines the means by which you use the presentation to create the stage upon which you will act.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Certain to Become a "Classic", July 17 2003
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
It would be a mistake to assume that the benefits of this book will be of greatest value only to those who make formal presentations. On the contrary, as Weissman explains so thoroughly and eloquently, each one of us every day is almost constantly telling a "story" in one form or another to achieve one or more of these objectives: to explain with information (exposition)...or to make vidid with compelling details (description)...or to explain a process or sequence with information (narration)...or to convince with logic and/or evidence (argumentation). The most effective formal presentations are those which make maximum use of all four levels of discourse. It is also worth mentioning that, although percentages vary from one research study to another, the impact of a face-to-face encounter is estimated to be as follows: body language 60-70%, tone of voice 15-20%, and content (i.e. what is actually said) about 10-15%. Skilled recruiters claim that more often than not, they have already made a decision about a candidate before the interview formally begins. In fact, it begins at the initial point of physical contact.
So, I think this book can be of greatest value to literally anyone whose communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal) need to be improved. The strategies and tactics which Weissman shares have almost unlimited applications: when making formal presentations and during job interviews, as noted, but also when preparing reports, contributing to group discussions (e.g. strategic planning and especially budget reviews), resolving problems with customer service, implementing crisis management initiatives, and conducting performance reviews.
Those who share my high regard for this book are urged to check out Stephen Denning's The Springboard: How Storytelling Ignites Action in Knowledge-Era Organizations and Kevin Hogan's The Psychology of Persuasion: How to Persuade Others to Your Way of Thinking.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hitting the Bulls-eye: 30 years in the Making, June 2 2003
By 
peter frame (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
Jerry Weismann's "Presenting to Win" odyssey began in the network news and programming studios on West 57th street at CBS, America's so-called "Tiffany" network.
His talent then for persuading the talent in front of the camera to follow his compelling and effective techniques for capturing the audience on the other side of the lens has now been dramatically transformed to the new century, the new media and today's new winning "presenter" persuader: YOU!
Despite the vastly changing times today and the clutter of competing chatter, Weismann has broken through again with the same clarity and simple formula for success that motivated the old crowd at CBS and the new breed just beginning to break in on the air and at the podium at that new upstart network in New York, HBO.
Jerry's talent then was what it is now : a piercing focus on giving us the winning recipe for bulls-eye communication, wherever the audience, whatever the message, whoever the voice.
This one belongs on every desk in every shop everywhere. Rembember, we're not that far from West 57th street and 1973; it's just a slightly different climate.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The WIIFY: Becoming a better business person, May 28 2003
By 
johnza "johnza" (Seattle, Washington) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story (Hardcover)
What's in it for you? Jerry Weissman's book and his entire approach not only prepare you to be an infinitely better presenter, the clarity of thinking and discipline he provides help you become a better business thinker. I am only one of tons and tons of people who are grateful for all of Jerry's help and guidance.
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Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story
Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story by Jerry Weissman (Hardcover - March 3 2003)
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