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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good quality for old edition
This book delivered after 7 days from ordering; besides I didn't request fast delivery. The quality of the book is very good as stated on the website. The book has high similarity to the second edition, however I prefer for other people to order the second or the third edition to not worry about differences in solved examples, structure and problems inside the textbook.
Published on Oct. 16 2011 by M. A. Naiel

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3.0 out of 5 stars Ok beginners book
This book seems to follow the disappointing (to me at least) model of many engineering texts--that being the reluctance to present new mathematical concepts/techniques. Almost every mathematical concept/technique used in this book was already covered by the prerequisite text by Oppenheim, "Signals and Systems." It would seem that a subject so entrenched with complex...
Published on Jan. 4 2003 by Ian Langmore


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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good quality for old edition, Oct. 16 2011
This book delivered after 7 days from ordering; besides I didn't request fast delivery. The quality of the book is very good as stated on the website. The book has high similarity to the second edition, however I prefer for other people to order the second or the third edition to not worry about differences in solved examples, structure and problems inside the textbook.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Ok beginners book, Jan. 4 2003
By 
Ian Langmore (New York, NY, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
This book seems to follow the disappointing (to me at least) model of many engineering texts--that being the reluctance to present new mathematical concepts/techniques. Almost every mathematical concept/technique used in this book was already covered by the prerequisite text by Oppenheim, "Signals and Systems." It would seem that a subject so entrenched with complex numbers and polynomials could be taught in such a manner that would include theorems and concepts from these well-established mathematical disciplines. Note that I did not read the chapter on Hilbert transforms, or the section on the Discrete Cosine Transform, so I cannot comment on them. I did read all other sections. The sections on random signals do introduce new concepts, but they were only put in as a quick review of concepts meant to be studied in a random processes class. On the other hand, this is a very readable book, which has proven very useful. It does present MANY new engineering concepts. If analytic function theory had been introduced, this book probably would not have room left to be as complete a reference for existing introductory DSP theory. However by avoiding the math it has limited the continuing students ability to develop insight into deeper theory, or develop new theory.
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4.0 out of 5 stars On the difference between 2nd Edition and 1st Edition, Aug. 8 2002
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This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
I used the author's book "Digital Signal Processing" in my college study, and I also read and cite the 1st Edition of
"Discrete-Time Signal Processing" during my work experience. That's a very good reference. But I don't have the
2nd Edititon.
However, after going through the Table Of Contents of the 2nd Edition of "Discrete-Time Signal Processing", I
think Oppenheim&Schafer did a resaonable tradeoff to reflect state of the art in DSP domain.
They add: Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) which is mostly used in image compression, Multirate Signal
Processing which is used widely in modern DSP, and Oversampling and Noise Shaping Sampling for A/D and D/A
conversion.
In consequence, they remove: Lattice Structure, IIR Filters Design, Cepstrum Analysis (often used in speech
signal processing) and Homomorphic Signal Processing, which are a bit sophisticated. And I guess the reason to
remove IIR Filter Dsign is there exists many computer-aided tools on digital filter design, and made this very easy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good reference, Sept. 21 2001
By 
"mk75" (Stanford, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
This book has its share of shortcomings, but overall, it is probably the best and most complete reference on DSP. Unfortunately, it does skip a few important topics. For example, the second edition threw out the section on designing IIR bandpass and highpass filters from lowpass prototypes. This section used to be in the first edition and is VERY important, so I don't see how Oppenheim & Schafer could have justified throwing it out. They also conspicuously left out filter design based on the frequency sampling method. But in spite of these omissions, it's hard to recommend another book over this one. The one that comes closest is Mitra's.
In the end, if you want to learn DSP and work in the field, you have to have this book, as well as the ones by Mitra, Proakis & Manolakis, Jackson, and, of course, Rabiner & Gold. If you get all those, you'll have the complete reference of CORE DSP texts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Reference or introduction?, June 6 2001
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
I found this book to be an excellent fundamental text about DSP. But is it a good introductory book for beginners? Well, it depends... The book covers the essential topics in great depth and that means every one of its 800+ pages is packed with concepts and details and examples. The style is clear, but the amount of information can be a little overwhelming when you read it for the first time. If you have time, patience, a good maths background, the desire to master the subject, and someone to clarify your doubts, this can be the best first book on DSP you could ever buy. If you just want to learn the basics, and don't have much time or patience you should probably look elsewhere.
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4.0 out of 5 stars review of the 1st edition, May 17 2001
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
I have read the 1st edition of this book, and one must say that it is slightly obscure. Some paragraphs are rather convoluted, written in the ancient, academic Germanic manner. Other than a certain obtuseness in writing style, the content is quite all right. The examples are illuminating. The 2nd edition of the book is apparently more "watered-down", destroying subjects such as lattice structures and cepstral analysis.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The reference for DSP, April 21 2001
By 
Steve Uhlig (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
This is probably the most complete reference in DSP. It's full of examples covering the whole stuff in DSP. However this is certainly not fur use as an introductory book because the aim is not the explanation of fundamental concepts in DSP (for that go to Lyons "Understanding Digital Signal Processing"). Maybe it is possible to learn DSP with this book but then as a companion of a good undergrad course, not for self-study.
As stated by another reviewer, this book is over-crowded with developments, details and examples that could be overwhelming to the newcomer. This is probably its biggest drawback, in that its completeness hinders on its readability. So be aware that this is not an easy DSP book, it's THE DSP book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good reference if you don't hate calculus, Feb. 2 2001
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
You cannot go out in the field of DSP without having heart of the names Oppenheimer & Schafer. I used the book as guiding text during my studies at the university and I frequently found the answers to my questions. In case you feel comfortable with calculus of complex variables, this book may be considered for selfstudy. If you are not familiar with advanced mathematics, perhaps you should think twice before buying this book. However, if you are professionally active in the area of DSP, you must have it in your library since it inspired many of your collegues in developping powerful applications.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not a beginners book, Sept. 13 2000
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
Although the authors say this book could be used as an introductory text in DSP, it is not. This book is a no nonsense approach towards DSP. You need firm grounding in calculus, signals and systems to be close to even understand what the authors intend to say.
With a good professor and with the skill set that the authors assume you have, you will find this a life long reference. How ever for the not so sure Stanley's Digital Signal processing is a much better choice.
The beginner should find Richard Lyon's Understanding DSP to be more user friendly, but if you outgrow Lyon, then this is the book that would whet your appetite.This book will be one you will frequently refer to clear your doubts.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The DSP Bible, Aug. 9 2000
By 
Amazon Customer (West Hartford, CT, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Discrete-Time Signal Processing (Hardcover)
As others have said, this is the DSP bible. I have worked in the field of DSP as a post-grad student, lecturer ("professor") and an R&D engineer for over 10 years now and this book is in my "must-have" collection. It is the book I learnt my DSP from; it is the book I have taught DSP from; it is a very good reference book for the practicioner.
Having said that, I should also point out what I believe this book is not (and why it gets only 4 stars) : it is not a good book for self-learning. If this is what you are after, I recommend Rick Lyons' book "Understanding Digital Signal Processing" (five stars from me).
If you are a mechanical engineer learning DSP, I suggest asking your local Bruel & Kjaer representative if he'll give you a copy of Bob Randall's "Frequency Analysis" published by B&K (ISBN 87 87355 07 8; "only" 3.5 stars, but 4.5 stars if you're a mechanical engineer).
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