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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't take it personally!
I must confess I ordered and read this book because my new boss recommended it. Well, now that we have unpacked all the boxes from our move to take this job - I find we have about 5 copies of this book. This book is GREAT! This is not a new book but has been read by millions of people and is now a classic. The first edition came out in 1981 and the second edition 10...
Published on June 30 2004 by M. Nelsen

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Packed with Knowledge!
Authors Roger Fisher, William L. Ury and Bruce M. Patton offer a seminal step-by-step guide to negotiating effectively. The authors use anecdotal examples to illustrate both positive and negative negotiating techniques. They believe that, with principled negotiation, both parties can reach an agreement in an amicable and efficient manner. Principled negotiation is based...
Published on March 1 2004 by Rolf Dobelli


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3.0 out of 5 stars A quick reminder about negotiation, April 20 2008
By 
B. Piché (Montréal, QC Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
When it comes to negotiation, people are often confronted with though bargaining that destroys relationships. Getting to Yes offers people a new way of looking at negotiation and enables negotiators to reach a mutual profitable agreement without hard feelings.

The Harvard Negotiation Project, which this book is based on, came to understand basic principles that should guide every dispute. Thus, it is important to focus on the issue at hand, not the people involved in it or the position one defends. Do not hesitate to stay creative and develop new solutions to the problem. Often, both parties don't realize all opportunities available and "leave money on the table", in the authors' words. Finally, use objective criteria to decide on a solution. The authors also explain how to negotiate with people in a stronger position than you are.

The authors' style is simple and easy to understand. Nicely divided into subsections, every chapter covers a particular principle. Additional questions asked following the first edition were annexed at the end of the original text in this version.

Overall, this book offers nothing new, but reminds the reader of techniques that can ease any negotiation.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book!, Feb. 5 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Incredible book! You will learn a lot about yourself and other people too. A must read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Getting to Yes by Fisher, Uri et al., Jan. 11 2004
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This book provides many practical examples on the art of negotiation. The author begins by encapsuling a negotiation into
a tri-parte process:
o It should produce a wise agreement if such a thing is possible
o It should be efficient.
o It should not damage the relationship between the parties.
A successful negotiation will meet the underlying concerns of the
parties. There are four points to a successful negotiation:
o Separate the people from the problem.
o Focus on interests and not positions.
o Generate a variety of possibilities.
o Insist that the result be based on an objective standard.
In addition, a good negotiation will present the various
options fairly. The parties should develop objective
criteria and fair procedures. When the other side attacks,
consider it as an option and improve upon it. Remember that
affirmative answers generate resistence and questions elicit
answers (thoughtful or otherwise). The essence of a principled
negotiation lays the foundation for a discussion of facts and
basic principles.
This work is a gold mine of advice on the art of negotiation.
It will help you to navigate through difficult situations artfully
while deflecting as much resistence as possible. This book will help you because it points out the
pitfalls of negotiations between parties; namely, adherence
to rigid positions, unwillingless to hear the other side and
attacks on people. The objective of a good negotiation is to
produce a fair result and to set forth rational guidelines
and rule structures for the parties to follow. This work
teaches contrary to the way people typically behave. As such,
it provides readers with scenarios that may not be in their
domain of everyday experience.
The author emphasizes the futility of adherence to rigid
positions without exploring alternatives and agreeing on
fair rule structures to evaluate the issues presented.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best easy-reader intro to negotiation you'll find., Jan. 9 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is a basic book on how to resolve things as peacefully as possible. It is not the sort of advanced text you'd expect if you are studying to become a professional mediator, but is rather aimed at people who could benefit from an introduction to (or review of) basic negotiation skills.
Some of these things are the sort of common sense people frequently think of (alas!) in hindsight - for instance, it talks about your 'best alternative to a negotiated solution'(before you demand that raise, ask yourself: how hard would it be for me to find a new job? Then: how hard would it be for my boss to replace me?) and how to set expectations against an objective standard - your position is much stronger if you are arguing based on the 'going rate', the usual practice, or some other outside measurement that an unbiased observer might consider a fair and reasonable expectation.
If you are divorcing, have a conflict with your landlord or neighbor, or want to get a better deal from your public schools with regards to your highly gifted or learning disabled child, it would definately pay off to read this book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good place to start for learning negotiating skills, Dec 29 2003
By 
Joanna Daneman (USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is not the be-all-end-all for learning negotiation, but it is an excellent start. If you have a sales force to train, this is an essential text, short enough and clear enough to use for the sales professional.
The Principles:
A. Separate the people from the problem: taking things personally makes for vested interests. Keeping these separate makes for objectivity. Maybe obvious, but essential.
B. Focus on interests, not positions: People tend to feel they lose if they shift position. An interest more objective. There can be multiple interests, and interests come in varied strengths.
C. Try to invent options for mutual gain: It's a win-win game.
D. You must insist on objective criteria: this is the first step to getting to "yes" in an argument. If something is held objective, it is easier to accept.
This should be on everyone's business shelf. A good beginning for learning negotiating skills.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A better way to work out agreements with other people, Aug. 14 2003
By 
Henry Cate III (CA. United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is a very good book about how to work out agreements with other people. The authors start off saying that many people negotiate some where along a spectrum of easy or hard negotiating, either they are willing to get along and often may give up something they really want, or they will push and push for what they want. The authors say it is better to stay back and figure out what is a fair deal for both sides. For example in buying a car you would look at what other people are paying for a similar model and number of miles. Or in getting a job the salary should be competitive with other people with similar backgrounds. The key point is to try and find ways to decide if an agreement is fair.
The method is basically:
1) Separating the people from the problem
2) Focusing on the interests, not positions
3) Inventing options for mutual gain
4) Insisting on using objective criteria
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4.0 out of 5 stars Subtitle says it all Negotiating Agreement Without Giving in, July 30 2003
By 
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Negotiating is a skill that can be learned. Getting to yes attempts to demistify the difficulties of reaching an agreement by providing simple and effective basis for negotiation. Through the identification of the interests, common to both parties or divergent, one learns how to create options in order to satisfy both parties' needs. The authors also suggest courses of action when confronted with difficult counterparties.
My only criticism would relate to the grammatical construction of some of the sentences. It is sometimes difficult to determine what the subject is. This requires the reader to go over the same sentence several times before being able to grasp the ideas set forth.
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3.0 out of 5 stars VERY BASIC INTRO TO NEGOTIATING, March 24 2003
By 
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is the first book I ever read on negotiating, and at the time I found it extremely good. However, since then, I have read both Shell's "Bargaining for Advantage" and Cialdini's "Influence", and found those two books immensely better than Getting to Yes, for a few different reasons.
Number of stories - in Getting to Yes, the authors do not offer enough stories to burn the concepts into the reader's mind. I personally think stories are the best way to communicate something like negotiating.
Actual psychological concepts explained - Getting to Yes is a summary of findings, and it never explains why certain things work. Without a deep understanding, it is not clear when the concepts work and when they don't. Especially in Influence, you really get to understand how to persuade someone by remembering the core psych concepts.
If you are just looking for a quick intro to negotiating, this is a decent book. If you would like to actually understand people and how to influence them, this is too basic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you only read 1 book on Negotiation - Read This!, March 16 2003
By 
J. Baynie "Cardini" (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
I've read many books on Negotiation, and use negotition actively and intensly in my day to day worklife. No book that I have read has given me more tangible & real life advise than this book. The authors, Fisher, Ury (& Patton for 2nd Ed), have done a supurb job at keeping the process of negotiation both simple & thorough. If you don't like conflict, and don't want to be pushed over by the more aggressive and experienced negotiator...then this book is an absolute must.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Find!, Feb. 13 2003
By 
"jshani" (Moreno Valley, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Excellent book! Methods discussed can be easily used in the real world!
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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by William L. Ury (Paperback - Dec 2 1991)
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