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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't take it personally!
I must confess I ordered and read this book because my new boss recommended it. Well, now that we have unpacked all the boxes from our move to take this job - I find we have about 5 copies of this book. This book is GREAT! This is not a new book but has been read by millions of people and is now a classic. The first edition came out in 1981 and the second edition 10...
Published on June 30 2004 by M. Nelsen

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3.0 out of 5 stars A quick reminder about negotiation
When it comes to negotiation, people are often confronted with though bargaining that destroys relationships. Getting to Yes offers people a new way of looking at negotiation and enables negotiators to reach a mutual profitable agreement without hard feelings.

The Harvard Negotiation Project, which this book is based on, came to understand basic principles that...
Published on April 20 2008 by B. Piché


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4.0 out of 5 stars Close to the ideal book on negotiation, Sept. 27 2000
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Fisher's idea of "principled negotiation" is the first real academic attempt to study the best ways to negotiate, and he delivers the material in an easy to follow manner. His main points are (1) seperate the people from the problem (2) Focus on interests and not positions (3) invent options for mutual gain, and (4) insist on objective criteria. However, you must truly think about these points to fully grasp the power of this negotiation style; the substance of those points are not as straight-forward as they seem. The most useful point for novice negotiators is "Focus on Interets, not positions. By reading this book you will learn to spot when someone is being positional and be able to disarm them quickly, but tactifully, as you move the discussion to the various parties' interests. The book is most useful in negotaiting any sort of economic transaction, but is applicable in many areas except maybe if you are negotiating with a govt. regulatory agency. Overall, a must read for any CEO or a person wanting to get the best price on a car. The main thing you should get from this book are the tools that help you to recognize value and not leave value on the table that can be distributed among the parties to maximize gain.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I tried it and it really worked!, Dec 22 1999
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Overall, I like this book a lot and I found it very useful.
Actually I didn't read through the whole book. Yet I did capture the key point of the book - 'Don't bargain over positions'. Then I used this principle-based negotiation in real life. For instance, when I am facing a challenge from my partner on my proposal, I won't fight back directly. I will first seek for the mutual interest, a common ground. Then I'll explain why I think my proposal can help achieve the mutual interest. Then I ask the opposing partner what he/she think and whether he/she wants to share any better proposal to achieve this mutual interest. If my/mutual interest can be satisfied, yet my partner has a better way to do it, then why not change my own proposal? I tried this approach several times and they all worked out pretty well. Most of the times I successfully convinced my partner without damaging relationship. A few times I changed my position yet I was still happy because I still had my interest satisfied.
Net, this book is really useful and recommend to BUY for everyone.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The book about honesty, simplicity and common sense., March 1 1999
By 
Zvonko Antunovic "azvonko" (Rijeka, Croatia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
It's really not easy to imagine a more effective and better book about negotiation skills. The authors reached very deep exploring the subject and, what's of the greatest value, with a beautiful simplicity: the whole approach is based on the common sense and reader can follow it intuitively. It seems you that there is nothing especially new in the book, but only pieces are placed on their proper positions, so you can get the whole picture. That's why this book, no doubt, will further spread the help to millions, not only on how to negotiate but also how to think. Looking for the way to save us from ourselves, the author showed us one road. If not the unique one, it's one of the best in the right direction and one we could take in time -- now.
I found this excellent book during my research for writings provoked by the decade of Balcanian "madness and badness", and after reading "Beyond Machiavelli", which is turned primarily towards high diplomacy staff. I was really excited discovering so much the same thinking to my own. Nevertheless, I mean that things viewed "from these shoes" still ask some additional answers and methods to be added. I'd like to find enough time to try, and "Getting to Yes" remains one of my main supports.
Potential reader could be misguided by the subtitle "Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In". Being there because of a mere overlook or because of marketing reasons, "giving in" sounds here as an absolutely unacceptable option. Instead, of course, giving in should become a normal step whenever we find out, even applying methods from this book, that our arguments are wrong. On the very same presumption lies any possible method to resolve conflicts peacefully. Well, it's only the subtitle; the book is written honestly, not as 'tricks and tips on how to cheat the other side but not to give in'.
Let me hold up the fifth star for a better book, If I ever read some
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5.0 out of 5 stars # 2 in my top ten list of Books on Negotiating, Jan. 8 1998
By 
eric@batna.com (Portola Valley, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
The foundation of all great negotiation books, Getting to Yes gives you the real essence of mutual gains negotiation. It's a neat, concise, little paperback, and a fast read. It's so neat and concise, in fact, that you should buy multiple copies and hand them out to people you like - or to people you want to like you. I've read it a dozen or so times and I keep finding new insights. The main ideas of the book are that positional negotiation is pointless, and that our negotiations should focus on interests rather than positions. As far as I'm concerned, if that's the only thing you recall from reading this book, you'll have learned something indispensable. But, by the time you finish Getting to Yes, you'll be convinced that negotiation is a simple matter of figuring out what you really want, what the other side wants, and working out the space where those interests intersect -- despite the generalizations, deletions, and distortions the other side might use to confuse you. One of the leading fundamental constructs presented in Getting to Yes - which differs radically from my own number one tenet - is "separate the people from the problem." Getting to Yes proposes that problems exist objectively and can be analyzed on their own merits, independent of people's perceptions, attributions, and relationships. My contention is that a problem only exists to whatever extent it is perceived by the beholder. As such , there is no problem if you separate the people from it. In real life, it's impossible to disentangle people issues from discussions of "concrete substance." Regardless of the prescriptive in Getting to Yes, real problem solving negotiations require constant simultaneous attention to the problem and the people. The skills you really need to extract and understand others' perceived interests in the context of a relationship aren't taught in Getting to Yes. The book diagnoses the conditions that cause difficulty in negotiation, but doesn't offer all components of the cure. Nevertheless, one dose each of Sales Effectiveness Training and Getting to Yes should cure just about anything that ails any normal negotiation. As John Kenneth Galbraith says of Getting to Yes, "This is by far the best thing I've ever read about negotiation...equally relevant for the individual who would like to keep his friends, property, and income and the statesman who would like to keep the peace." What other endorsement do you need?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Arrogant in their intent but admirable in their method, July 22 2001
By 
D. Friedman (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
The authors propose that all the world's difficulties could be resolved if only parties adhered to the principles of negotiation outlined in this book. I doubt, of course, that the Israelis and Palenstinians, for example, could find an ever-lasting peace simply by adhering to the principles laid out in this book. Such thinking is reductive, naive and quite possibly arrogant. In any event, that caveat aside, what the authors present is an interesting set of tools one can use in negotiating with another party. While most people will find themselves negotiating in situations far less dire than that of the Israelis and Palestinians (a business deal, a divorce, inheritances, etc.), the tools _in theory_ are applicable everywhere. However, the authors fail to prove that the tools are _in practice_ applicable everywhere. This failure to prove the tools' applicability in practice may be attributable to the authors' hailing from the theoretical shield of academia.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Way to Overcome Communications Stalls, Jan. 24 1999
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
In virtually all circumstances where people are working together, they come to agreement in ways that short-change the interests of everyone involved. This landmark book shows practical ways to find out what other people want, and to devise better alternatives that create a "win" for everyone. The authors do a great job of overcoming the preconception that many hold that working on problems means that you have to be unpleasant. The advice to be hard on the problems and easy on the people (building a relationship) is a key concept that everyone can use. I have found this book to be one of the most helpful that I have every read, and I cite its lessons in my own book. I recently had a chance to use these principles in a negotiating workshop with veteran negotiators, and I was struck by how few people apply the lessons of GETTING TO YES. You will vastly improve your life if you read and practice the ideas in GETTING TO YES.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good place to start for learning negotiating skills, Dec 29 2003
This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is not the be-all-end-all for learning negotiation, but it is an excellent start. If you have a sales force to train, this is an essential text, short enough and clear enough to use for the sales professional.
The Principles:
A. Separate the people from the problem: taking things personally makes for vested interests. Keeping these separate makes for objectivity. Maybe obvious, but essential.
B. Focus on interests, not positions: People tend to feel they lose if they shift position. An interest more objective. There can be multiple interests, and interests come in varied strengths.
C. Try to invent options for mutual gain: It's a win-win game.
D. You must insist on objective criteria: this is the first step to getting to "yes" in an argument. If something is held objective, it is easier to accept.
This should be on everyone's business shelf. A good beginning for learning negotiating skills.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book is the foundation for successful negotiations, Oct. 13 2000
By 
K. Larrabee "k_elle" (soCAL) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
I read this book in an MBA course for Dispute Mediation. Although it was not a required reading, every text and article mentioned this book. You can easily read it in a weekend. Do not expect theory, paradigm, or lofty descriptions-this is cut to the chase stuff that lets you know many techniques for negotiating and helping the other side make a decision that is right for all involved. Some helpful key concepts include elimintating emotions from the process, or dealing with the emotional techniques that the other side may use against you. It also describes BATNA, or the best alternatives to a negotiated agreement-those agreements which may be the most realistic and beneficial terms for both sides. I think that the other book, getting past no, by the same author, is an additional reference that anyone considerring this book should also read as an excellent complementary text to the principles outlined in this classic.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A better way to work out agreements with other people, Aug. 14 2003
By 
Henry Cate III (CA. United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
This is a very good book about how to work out agreements with other people. The authors start off saying that many people negotiate some where along a spectrum of easy or hard negotiating, either they are willing to get along and often may give up something they really want, or they will push and push for what they want. The authors say it is better to stay back and figure out what is a fair deal for both sides. For example in buying a car you would look at what other people are paying for a similar model and number of miles. Or in getting a job the salary should be competitive with other people with similar backgrounds. The key point is to try and find ways to decide if an agreement is fair.
The method is basically:
1) Separating the people from the problem
2) Focusing on the interests, not positions
3) Inventing options for mutual gain
4) Insisting on using objective criteria
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5.0 out of 5 stars Could be titled "How to Succeed in Life", June 18 2000
By 
Jordan Cunningham "Jordan" (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In (Paperback)
Rarely does one find a book that has so much applicability and also speaks with so much clarity. It's a "How to" book about negotiating, a skill that virtually everyone in life employs on a daily basis. You learn simple concepts that you can apply while getting some good anecdotal backbone that makes it very read-able. Those interested/working in politics and/or law will find it "up their alley" - but everyone would benefit from a read. I would put this book in there with the likes of "The Road Less Travelled", "How to Win Friends and Influence People", "The Meaning of Life" and probably the ubiquitous "Seven Habits..." - a group of works which all just teach you how to be a stellar human being. Well, gives you a map anyway, you have to walk the path yourself. Of course I'm still walking...
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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In by William L. Ury (Paperback - Dec 2 1991)
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