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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect!
Thank you for the fast shipping and the great condition. The book is great, very useful with my students! They've learned a lot!
Published on Feb. 16 2012 by JP Morency

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2.0 out of 5 stars the pearl
The Pearl
By: Will Kern
Boring! That's the one word that I can use to describe this true but uneventful book. I mean it still had events, but lets just say they did nothing to make this book a good read. The book was also too predictable. You knew exactly when something bad are good was going to happen in the book. If something bad were going to happen...
Published on Dec 6 2002 by Will Kern


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4.0 out of 5 stars A short, simple story well told, Jan. 3 2013
By 
Rodge (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Steinbeck proves that morality tales don't have to be preachy and annoying in this fine, short work. The discovery of a highly valuable pearl unleashes a sequence if ugly events. The parallel to the American Dream is obvious, but the story has a simple, unflinching power that will stay with you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect!, Feb. 16 2012
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Thank you for the fast shipping and the great condition. The book is great, very useful with my students! They've learned a lot!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Simple Story Simply Told, April 12 2009
By 
Oliver (Los Angeles) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
The Pearl is essentially a morality tale about how the pursuit of wealth can lead to unhappiness. Perhaps that is unfair; putting it that way conjures up images of preachiness and boredom. The Pearl is neither preachy nor boring. It is a simple, short story, well told. It is well worth the short time it will take you to read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "The Pearl", Jan. 2 2003
By 
Ken Lin (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
The Pearl by John Steinbeck was set at a little village called La Paz in Baja California, Mexico. In this book the main character Kino has Live in this small village with his wife, Juana and his son, Coyotito. Although that they are poor, they all has a great life, until Coyotito had been bitten by the scorpion. Kina had no money to pay for the doctor to treat his son. So they went to the gulf to try to find a pearl, so that he can pay the doctor to treat his son. Fortunately he had found the pearl, and it is not just a little pearl, it is "The Pearl Of The World. "It is as perfect as the moon and as big as the sea gull's egg". First Kino thinks that this pearl will bring a good future to him and his family, but instead this pearl is the root of all the evil. It has brought fear and evil and also a lot of problems to Kino and his family. Will Kino and his family overcome all the problems or will the problems get them?
I think the book "The Pearl" is a very nice book and also a helpful book for everyone, and I will rate it with five stars. I think that everyone should read this book, because it is a very interesting book and it has all kinds of conflicts. And most important is that it tells people never to be greedy, when people are greedy, or want a thing too much, they will never get those things that they want. Instead, they will get something evil.
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2.0 out of 5 stars the pearl, Dec 6 2002
By 
Will Kern (Charlottesville) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
The Pearl
By: Will Kern
Boring! That's the one word that I can use to describe this true but uneventful book. I mean it still had events, but lets just say they did nothing to make this book a good read. The book was also too predictable. You knew exactly when something bad are good was going to happen in the book. If something bad were going to happen then a "song of evil" would begin to play. If something nice was going to happen there either wasn't a song or it was a calm song that he would hum.

It is nice that he would write a story that had been passed down for generations in this small little village, but he picked the wrong one. He should have picked one with more action and adventure to it. It was also unfortunate that in the end Kino becomes the bad guy, but learns a lesson that money is not always everything.
John Steinbeck makes a mistake in making the family to blind in what is going on around them. Like when the doctor says the effect of the scorpion sting will come later and may cause Coyotito to become blind. So the doctor gave the baby a white powder in a gelatin capsule. The baby takes the pill, and the doctor says this will stop the pain although the baby seems to have no more pain. He says he will come back in an hour. So he does and for some reason gives the baby water with ammonia. Kino is unable to pay him at the time, but once he sells the pearl he will repay him. He makes a big mistake at that time. The doctor says that he should keep with him, in his safe. At that time Kino looks down at the floor where he has buried the pearl. The doctor realizes it and has a plan. He comes the night to steal it, but wakes Kino and is nearly stabbed. Juana wakes up and tells Kino that they must get rid of it or there will be evil and they will be destroyed. The book could have saved us a lot of trouble and ended right there but Kino refuses to get rid of it.
Later in the book Kino sees Juana walking out towards the beach, he feels a sense of rage, she is going to get rid of the pearl. He sprints after her, and punches her in the face, and then kicks her. He leaves her and walks back up the beach. A man then comes to him in search for the pearl. He starts to fight Kino and he drops the pearl, but it does not matter because he slits the guy's throat and regains the pearl. For some reason Juana forgets all about what Kino has done to her and says that t hey must leave for he has killed a man. It would have kept my interest had there been a little more turmoil between the two, but Juana just shrugs it off. Kino is once again reminded that he should have sold the pearl for it is bringing him much more then he had ever imagined.
This book does show us a good moral though. There are a lot of greedy people in the world, and if you are one of them you should probably read this book. I would not recommend it to those who like an action packed adventurous book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Pearl by John Steinbeck, Dec 2 2002
By 
"junim" (USA - English Per. 6) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
Although this book may be slim and thin, it gives a powerful and straight forward teachings of the natures of men. Kino, the main character, goes through a tragic event of being unable to afford his son's visit to the doctor as the wound from the poisonous scorpion kept on getting worse. To save his beloved son, he dives into the waters and finds a pearl that seemed to posess the shape and the size of a full moon. When the words quickly spread about the mysterious pearl, he soon finds him self stranded between the greedy who devastatingly want to purchase his beautful item. Unluckly, as the story progresses towards the end, Kino faces many depressing results. However, to those who love short and heart thrilling novels, I highly recommend this book... READ IT TODAY!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Parable, Amazing Plot, Powerful Message..., Oct. 28 2005
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
The Pearl, by John Steinbeck, is truly a timeless, well-crafted masterpiece. Steinbeck, the winner of the 1962 Nobel Prize for literature, uses vivid descriptions to portray an ordinary Mexican man, Kino, who is one of the poor and oppressed people of his village. From a distance, Kino has an ideal life; he has everything a man could want: a roof over his head, food to eat, a loving wide and a healthy child. Everything changes one day, when he discovers a large, perfect and beautiful pearl. Word of the discovery quickly spreads throughout the village, and ideas for the future quickly fill Kino's head. This pearl could be the thing that could bring Kino out of poverty and create a better life for his family. The future seems perfect for Kino. Unfortunately, he is quite wrong...
Originally a Mexican folk tale, The Pearl, is simply more than a straightforward story of a man who finds a pearl. The Pearl is a powerful parable of inner struggle, greed, jealously, oppression, bravery and so much more. Steinbeck carefully weaves into his folk tale his own creative and personal style using vivid descriptions and strong metaphors. This book is a novel we should all live by. I highly recommend this book to readers of all ages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Steinbeck's Pearl, May 10 2004
By 
Robin Friedman (Washington, D.C. United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
John Steinbeck's short novel "The Pearl" (1947) is unusual in that the book appeared after Steinbeck wrote a screenplay for a film of the same name. The film was released to coincide with the publication of the book. The novel is short, deceptively simple, and deservedly famous. It is based upon a Mexican folk tale and tells the story of a poor family who become, potentially, wealthy by the discovery of a pearl of rare size and beauty. This sudden wealth does not result in happiness.
Steinbeck sets the stage with a short, two-paragraph preface introducing the main characters: "Kino, the fisherman, .. his wife, Juana, and ... the baby, Coyotito." Steinbeck describes the story as "a parable" in which, "perhaps everyone takes his own meaning from it and reads his own life into it."
Kino, Juana and Coyotito are poor and and live in a simple thatched house. The baby is bitten by a scorpion and Kino and Juana become concerned for his life but have no money to pay a doctor. Kino miraculously finds a pearl of great worth and the couple dream of a better life. But from the outset, the pearl provokes jealousy and violence and leads to great unhappiness for the little family.
I was moved by the figures of song and music that appear throughout the story. We are told at the beginning that Kino's people "had been great makers of songs so that everything they saw or thought or did or heard became a song." Kino hears in his heart various songs throughout his book, the most important of which is the "Song of the Family" or the "Whole" which celebrates his life with his wife and baby. Other songs that figure prominently include the "Song of Evil", the "Song of the Sea" and the "Song of the Pearl". It is interesting to follow the song imagery as the story progresses.
The other part of this story that most struck me were the scenes of nature -- of the water and mountains. There is a theme of wandering that comes through poignantly in the last part of the book in which the family struggles through mountains and valleys in an attempt to evade stalkers who are pursing them for the pearl. This last portion of the book includes much moving writing.
Many people read this book as part of an intoduction to American literature in high school or college. The book is accessible and short and is a highly appropriate way to get to know a major 20th Century American novelist. Still, I remember how easy it is to dislike a book forced upon a reader when young. In my own case, I did not read this book in school (I read other Steinbeck) and only came upon it recently too many years later. In any event, it is a short and beautiful story that glows with the many colors and ambiguities as did the pearl which Kino discovered and which inspired the book. This is a lovely work of American literature which the reader will enjoy getting to know.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Moral fable or political diatribe? You decide!, Aug. 7 2009
By 
Paul Weiss (Dundas, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Pearl (Paperback)
Kino is a pearl diver in La Paz, Mexico, eking out a meager subsistence living for his wife, Juana, and their infant son, Coyotito. When Coyotito is stung by a scorpion, Kino is both embarrassed and angered by the fact that the arrogant, self-centered town doctor is unwilling to help because they are unable to pay. Diving long and deep, perhaps to cool off his anger or perhaps to find an extra pearl or two so that he might have the money for his son's care, he emerges from the Gulf of Mexico with the largest, most exquisite pearl that his community has ever seen. It is quickly labeled as "The Pearl of the World".

Thinking it to be the future source of his family's future health, comfort, happiness and peace, Kino seeks to sell it to the local pearl buyers who attempt to swindle him, offering only a fraction of its real value. When the pearl becomes the target of sneak thieves in the middle of the night, Kino kills the thief defending himself, his family and the pearl that is now the central focus of their lives.

Kino and Juana realize that the doctor, the priest and those already possessed of wealth in the town are angry that he should presume to step out of his station. While their friends, the other pearl fishermen, are happy for Kino's good fortune they are also jealous and convinced that Kino's sudden wealth will change him into a new person - a person that, in some fashion, will choose to distance himself from the people he formerly loved and valued.

Steinbeck's story writing skills are eloquent, compelling, and impossibly tight and concise but, at the same time, astonishingly profound and moving. Steinbeck's writing is the very antithesis of the style of Charles Dickens, for example, another consummate storyteller, but one who never failed to write astonishingly complex sentences and paragraphs using an enormous number of words where one would do.

For example, when Kino said, "I am a man", insisting that he must defend his family and his goods, Steinbeck perfectly described a woman's understanding of what a man meant when he said that:

"It meant that he was half insane and half God. It meant that Kino would drive his strength against a mountain and plunge his strength against the sea. Juana, in her woman's soul, knew that the mountain would stand while the man broke himself; that the sea would surge while the man drowned in it."

On the flip side, any female reader today would appreciate Steinbeck's brief but powerful statement of his admiration of their good sense:

"Sometimes the quality of woman, the reason, the caution, the sense of preservation could cut through Kino's manness and save them all."

Read on the surface, "The Pearl" is a beautifully told, sadly moving parable that expounds on the often repeated childhood mantra, "Money can't buy happiness". A slightly more sophisticated reader will also take away the message that wealth is equivalent to power which, as we all come to know, can be its own evil leading to corruption and deceit. A deeper analytical reading, perhaps from a world-weary, more cynical adult, may give rise to the conclusion that, writing in the early 1960s, Steinbeck was also indulging in a political criticism of the wealthy class and the authorities. Perhaps he was even expounding on the virtues of socialism, a political posture that was, to say the least, unpopular in the USA at that time.

However you choose to read it, "The Pearl" is a short novella, easily read in a mere two to three hours, that deserves to be in a library of classic American literature.

Paul Weiss
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4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, Sept. 7 2007
Kino and his wife, Juana, have a beautiful baby boy, but one morning he gets stung by a scorpion. He is rushed to the doctor, who will not treat him because they have no form of payment.

The parents get in their boat to look for a pearl to use as payment, and, amazingly, find one that is referred to as the "moon" -- and is about the size of a goose egg.

What happens when they go to the dealers to collect their money? You'll have to read this classic novel to find out.

THE PEARL is a very short book that, honestly, I wouldn't have chosen to read except that it's for school. It's a very basic story, but everything in the book also has a double meaning, which is thought-provoking.

Reviewed by: Taylor Rector
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The Pearl
The Pearl by John Steinbeck (Paperback - Sept. 14 1993)
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