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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic tale that lives forever
My son needed this book for his English course. I had actually taught it myself. It was a pleasure to revisit the characters, the theme, the era. A classic story and at such an affordable price.
Published 11 months ago by Liz Spittal

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars of mice and men
this book may be easy to study for english literature, being short. However, this story is not interesting in the least, with a plot that builds up and then is thrown away totally at the end.
Published on July 5 2001


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic tale that lives forever, July 20 2013
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This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
My son needed this book for his English course. I had actually taught it myself. It was a pleasure to revisit the characters, the theme, the era. A classic story and at such an affordable price.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't wait to read this..., May 19 2014
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This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
I haven't read this book yet but it arrived in a timely matter and in great condition. I read this in school and I can't wait to read it again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars School read, April 14 2014
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This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Kindle Edition)
Had to read this for school, and ended up enjoying it. good read! Would read it again and recommend it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, Dec 23 2013
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My son got this for his birthday in early Dec. he is very happy being able to read these classics. Steinbeck is a great writer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars still reading, Dec 8 2013
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I am reading Of Mice and Men. Saw the movie and know what to expect so sometimes, even though it is beautifully written, I have to leave it and go back to it. Red Pony was excellent.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Short But Great American Masterpiece, May 23 2005
By 
Bryan Morrison (Port Orchard, WA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
The story starts with George and Lennie running away from their previous town of occupation, where Lennie, in his childlike manner, wants to touch a girl's red dress but doesn't let go, resulting in shouts of rape, mass chaos, and the pair of them getting chased out of town (you don't learn all this immediately, though.) They find work at a nearby ranch, which is where most of the story takes place.
One of the things that immediately stuck out to me about this book is Steinbeck's writing style. Heavily focused on dialogue, the overall terseness and efficient use of words is only interrupted occasionally when Steinbeck describes a new scene, where he goes into great detail. Otherwise, all you see on paper is exactly what you need to understand the story; this prevents it from dragging too much, and it allows the story to progress more quickly without spending forever on the same topic. This results in a natural flow of events that won't leave you reading the same thing re-stated 10 times; as a result, you'll want to read more because you know good things are always around the turn of the page. To almost put it in a blatantly simple manner, this reads like a very complex bedtime story.
Probably the thing that sticks out most to me is the incredibly well portrayed characters. Steinbeck takes a very Hemingway-like approach in both quantity and quality of characters; he keeps the book very condensed in terms of plots, sub-plots, complex characters, etc ...(it's barely 100 pages), which means you won't be scratching your head after every chapter going, "What on earth just happened?" It's a testament to his writing style that each character is so individually portrayed in a span of barely 100 pages, yet I didn't feel like anything was missing; I could visualize every one of the characters in real life. He does an excellent job of fleshing out the characters simply through what they say, not having to rely on superfluous dialogue or extraneous details to get their personalities across.
Finally, the ending of Of Mice and Men is very powerful. It illustrates a theme that must have been particularly prevalent in them minds of most people during the Great Depression: "When do we draw the line on tolerance and do what has to be done?" Although the entire book is impressive in its lucidity, the ending is particularly impressive because it brings extreme tragedy to the novel without a change in style; it's perfectly believable, yet not something you really want to believe. Part of it is due to the memorable characters (I assure you you won't forget Lennie after the ending of the book), part of it is just Steinbeck's genius. Pick up a copy of this classic book! Another novel I need to recommend -- completely unrelated to Steinbeck, but very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, an exceptional, highly entertaining little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Review of Mice and Men-a banned book?, Aug. 22 2003
By 
S. Shueh "Book Warm" (LAX, Ca) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
This popular high school or college required reading written by Steinbeck was one book I have never read. Neither have I watched the movie (1940) or newer versions (1981, 1992). What intrigues me is Amer Library Association has listed the novel as top sixth 100 banned books during 1990-1999. How can popular novels written by a famous author who earned a Presidential Metal of Freedom in 1964 received banned and challenged review years after initial publication? Perhaps it was a typo until I confirmed:
· "Of Mice and Men" was banned:
Syracuse, Indiana, 1974;
Oil City, Pennsylvania, 1977;
Grand Blanc, Michigan, 1979;
Continental, Ohio, 1980
Skyline High School, Scottsboro, Alabama, 1983.
· The book was challenged:
Greenville, South Carolina, 1977;
Vernon-Verona-Sherill, NY, School District, 1980;
St. David, Arizona, 1981;
Telly City, Indiana, 1982;
Knoxville, Tennessee, School Board, 1984
Steinbeck wrote the novel at his house in Los Gatos, Ca back in 1937. It was an era of depression; migrant workers and poverty persisted in the US. Steinbeck had dropped out of Stanford earlier to work on the Sprechels Sugar Ranch in this area as a farm hand. He observed the workers behavior and wrote about them. They represented low education and economically poorly people who would do anything to survive. He accurately described the way things were with no flowerily words.
The plot of the novel was quite straight forward.
George Mitton (witty, small) and Lennie Small (big man with small brain) both dreamed of acquiring a little land of their own someday. They also were in need of each other's company. This was in the middle of the depression years among many poor migrant workers searched for work. As low social class they got no respect in the society. Steinbeck showed his sympathy and concern for the down trodden the way we are concerned with homeless and jobless today.
Paired with both accusations and past accidents these two went to work at a Ranch. It was there the readers were introduced to some interesting characters, all seemed to evolve around rancher's son Curley. Curley is the bully, always ready to pick on those weaker people, but was an unsequired person and a disaster. He failed to be a respected boss #2, husband, and a man. His wife (name never mentioned) knew what was missing in life. She tried to get Lannie's attention in taking her. It led to her accidental death. The end of the novel was worth contemplation and debate. Lennie Small hid in the brush and awaited his frightful punishment. George Mitton had to make a decision; he took matters into his own hands by ending Small's life. The tragic ending could have been averted. Some writers sometimes believe the ending of a novel to provide vicarious happy endings especially targeted for youth. Steinbeck ended it as a tragedy.
Could in the novel George Mitton run away in the novel from the crime scene with the woman? Would George have waited for justice to be meted out by a bunch of gun carrying migrant workers who were ready to shoot Lennie? To some readers true literary tragedy is distasteful. This may be one of the reasons that the novel was challenged by many parents if not banned?
I thought Steinbeck experimented with novel structured like a play. To satirize its silliness, to attack its injustices, to stigmatize its faults. He achieved this goal remarkably well in this novel. In fact, the book was in the form of a play (1937) and ended as an opera (1970).
In retrospect, throughout the novel there were words or vernaculars of improper conduct, vulgar language, presentation of low social class characters which can be objectionable to YA or their parents. I list some examples found from the six chapters including but not limited to:
1.Live off the fatta the lan', 2. Bustin' a gut, 3. Cat house, 4. Health issues like pants rabbits, 5. Shove out of here, 6. What the hell's he got on his shoulder, 7. Crack and flop, 8. Goo-goos.
The urge to control other's lives and restrict what they can read appears to be just below the surface. People may deny that they want to censor books and mouth platitudes about appropriate reading material, but the end results are challenges to books in schools and libraries.
I would hesitate recommending this book at junior high or grade school. As for YA a novel teaches more than the mechanics of reading, the vernaculars used actually helps to stimulate critical thinking skills. As teenagers they are old enough to discuss and debate the meanings of the vulgar language as it applies today. For college age patrons, they are old enough to vote and fight for America they should be allowed to read as they please.
This is a good book to read and to comtemplate.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars of mice and men, July 5 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
this book may be easy to study for english literature, being short. However, this story is not interesting in the least, with a plot that builds up and then is thrown away totally at the end.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read this Book., Aug. 4 2011
By 
J Reader (CANADA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
Steinbeck's 1930's tale of friendship amid the depression is a heart warming classic that any reader would be able to enjoy. Steinbeck's gift is his ability to create completely honest characters. In Of Mice and Men I felt as though I knew them. When I reached the final page it was like saying good bye to friends.

In this novel Steinbeck shows great compassion and tenderness for his characters. As a reader it was very easy to become engrossed in their story. The scenes are so vividly described that at times I could taste the dust.

Of Mice and Men is dramatic literature, but this novel is very accessible. Anyone looking for a good quick read should pick this up you won't be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of America's greatest authors, March 22 2007
This review is from: Of Mice and Men (Paperback)
Stienbeck did a very good job in recreating the 1930's. He especially did a good job with the migrant workers. When Lennie and George had only two cans of beans, they carried bindles and work tickets, and how they were traveling to get to a new job really gave the reader a good example of how poor the migrant workers in this time really were, and how their lives were. Steinbeck had very good characters in the book, and they were characters that the readers could relate to. When Candy let Carlson kill his dog because it was old, he was giving up something he loved very much. That is something that readers can easily relate too. This is a very good book for younger adults to read because it addresses many different social issues. Discrimination is one of the very big issues in this book, and it is addressed extremely well by the author. The only other novel I enjoyed this much was The Bark of the Dogwood which was just absolutely fascinating and I couldn't stop turning the pages.
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Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (Paperback - Sept. 16 1993)
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