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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well Worth a look.
This is a very good book. While not perfect by any stretch, it is a very good look at a side of the world that few appreciate in the West.
Firstly, the writing is acutly personal. The thing that prevents this getting five stars is the lengthy introspective part on his family. It doesnt really contribute to the point that he is trying to make- heroin and conflict are...
Published on June 10 2002 by DeathfromAFar

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Loyd Misses the Points I Hoped He Would Hit
First let me preface this by saying that I am a U.S. Army Officer who served in Bosnia for 7 months commanding an Engineer Company. We did a lot of counter-mine operations. I dealt with the Muslims and the Serbs at almost a personal level on a daily basis. After I returned, I longed to get some insight into what motivated and drove these people to do the atrocities...
Published on Dec 19 2001 by Paul B. Olsen


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well Worth a look., June 10 2002
By 
DeathfromAFar "deathfromafar" (North Canterbury New Zealand) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
This is a very good book. While not perfect by any stretch, it is a very good look at a side of the world that few appreciate in the West.
Firstly, the writing is acutly personal. The thing that prevents this getting five stars is the lengthy introspective part on his family. It doesnt really contribute to the point that he is trying to make- heroin and conflict are addictive, and it just tends to blunt the main messages of the book.
Secondly, the description of the characters and events he has dealt with are as good as it gets. I to have served overseas and the descriptions he uses are accurate and correct.
The book gives you littles insight into why the conflict occurs, but if you want to get an insight into the addiction to conflict and hatred that drives the war, the book is worth its price for the introductory chapter alone.
Buy it, I do not think you will regret it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I bought it for my daughter - she loved it!, March 14 2014
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My daughter was doing a documentary on this topic and wanted this book - she loved it. She found a lot of material that helped her.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brought back the nightmares, Aug. 4 2004
By 
Rich Mills (Halifax, NS Canada) - See all my reviews
I'll get right to the point. I served in Croatia during the same time period of the first half of the book (1993). I watched whole villages be ethnically cleansed while being prevented from entering the area by the perpertrators tanks. I stared down the barrels of automatic weapons while trying to establish a buffer zone between the beligerents. I walked through areas where the only thing alive was myself and the other guys in my section. I slept 10 feet from the 3 day old corpse of an old woman. I came home to a country where the majority of the people I encountered didn't know, didn't care, and didn't want to believe me. I still have nightmares, and this book has brought them back with a vengence. This book is real.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, Sept. 20 2001
By 
La Hormiga Atomica (Washington, DC United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
Anthony Loyd provides a personal perspective of the war in Bosnia that is truly magnificent. His account is honest and direct; a magnificent exploration of the devastating effects of war, both on those who wage it and those who witness it, as retold through a pseudo-narrative of his experiences -- leading up to, during, and immediately following -- the Bosnian war, where he was a correspondent.
The experiences of Mr. Loyd are beautifully enhanced by his magnificent writing and the reader, at the end of the book, is left with the distinct impression that (s)he has been allowed a privileged glimpse into a world most of us are blessed not to hav witnessed, but which we all have a duty to know.
Mr. Loyd deserves high praise for his work, and I recommend this book to absolutely everyone.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing, Aug. 14 2001
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
This is one of the most gut wrenching books you will ever read. One would hope that the attitudes that causes conflicts of this type would be gone from the world and you can get extremely ill reading about the war and the atrocities. What really get you make thought is the ineptitude of the European leaders in dealing with this crisis. Anthony Lloyd focuses mainly on the British response to the crisis but you can tell that most of the European countries act the same way. There is much anti-American feeling in Europe at this time. I feel most of it is guilty sub-conscience because deep down they know that they cannot and will not in the future be able to handle conflicts of this kind and they resent having to turn to America for help.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just when you thought you lived in a civlized world..., July 22 2001
By 
Michael J. Muscato "mjmuscato" (Irvine, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
Although it is easy to say that this is a book about Bosnia, the title says it all. This is a meditation on Loyd's witness to the sickening and senseless violence he saw in Bosnia and Chechnya, played off against his own admitted interest in being around such chaos and bloodshed. It has become a standard response to the Rwandas and Bosnias of the world to say "What could make formerly peaceful people, pick up arms and murder their neighbors?" Loyd shows that although he is repulsed by the killing, there lurks inside himself a part that is drawn to it; not only out of curiousity, but for the ability of such situations to make him feel more alive...more connected. He is honest enough to admit that he is not that much different than the killers that are typically branded as non-human, genocidal thugs. Loyd also talks about something that has been forgotten in the "modern" world...the concept of "evil." Although he is reluctant to use the word, he finds that eventually there is no other way to describe what he has seen....he sees evil as a palpable presence that seems to have settled in for a protracted stay in Bosnia. Lastly, I should mention that Loyd's writing is quite good at drawing you into the book...I was hooked after the first 8 pages which left me stunned and a bit unnerved as to what lay ahead. I have re-read this opening passage several times and am always left in state of shock that such a world still exists, and admiration for Loyd in honestly showing his own demons and those who ran amuk in Bosnia. Philip Gourevitch's "We wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families" is a great companion piece if you need any more convincing that we live in a barbaric age, and that pronouncments of "Never Again" are hollow words when the developed world turns a blind eye if their own immediate self-interest is not at stake.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Stanley Kubrick and Thomas Harris could learn from this guy, May 1 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
In a book that is almost as much a healing for the author as it is war correspondence, Anthony Loyd travels to Bosnia in the early 90s, to "find" a war that he never got to fight in Desert Storm as a British platoon commander.
In this 321-page book of a self-loathing death-wish, the author travels between Central Bosnia, a London flat and Grozny, Chechnya, revealing the most intimate details of his heroin abuse and the war he seeks out as the only refuge from his addition. If this book had included a 17th-century composer and Stanley Kubrick's permission, Loyd could have written a sequel to "A Clockwork Orange", only on a national level. The almost-surreal nature of combat, both in the Balkans and in Chechnya, reveal the worst in combat, something not seen in the likes of World War II, Korea or even Vietnam.
His harrowing tale of murder, rape and carnage on the front lines of Bosnia are a must read for anyone who will serve in the Balkans. One must appreciate the Hell that was forged by all three guilty parties in Bosnia and Loyd does a perfect job of capturing it. He also portrays the Bosnian people openly and accurately, accentuating their bravado as well as their kindness on a personal level. Also reflected in his work, is the pure evil that comes from a battle where the combatants are fighting for everything from Allah to fascism.
Once you stomach the "stream-of-consciousness" chapters in which Loyd battles his addiction to heroin, he allows you to see the demons he is fighting and his need to go to war as a means of self-destruction in a time of his life where he is drifting between boredom, "smack" withdrawal and self disgust.
Buy this book and experience the atrocities of war first-hand.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping and disturbing., April 27 2001
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
It took me a while to get into this book. But once I realized that there wasn't a good side, or a bad side, or any explanation as to why this was going on, or how we got involved, or why we're still involved the book started to make sense. At least as much sense as a foreign civil war can. The author takes us from arriving in Sarajevo through final cease-fire with a brief (but very violent) diversion into Chechnya. Loyd spends much of his time with common people and soldiers, and is through their eyes that we see most of the war. Despite the number of deaths, mutilations, and general horrors you can be assured that a story even more disgusting and appalling is only a few pages away. This books greatest strength is that it never loses its raw edge.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Heart full of napalm, April 12 2001
By 
T. Olson "hyades" (Las Vegas NV) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
My War Gone By is a brutally honest account of Loyd's penchant for destruction. It's war journalism, but so personally invested that it takes on a life beyond mere news reporting. You may not agree with Loyd's moral complacency, but you never doubt that he means what he says.
Loyd's book won't help you to understand the political and military complexities of the Bosnian war(s), but it will transport you to the front lines, and beyond that to the reasons why Loyd loves being there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A face from the other side of the mirror, April 12 2001
This review is from: My War Gone By, I Miss It So (Paperback)
"I did not know the details but I decided to go there...I felt young and lucky."
Few war correspondents of any age have been as devoid of a sense of calling as Anthony Loyd. In 1992 he went to Sarajevo with a diploma in photography as his "cover" and an adolescent's fascination with war as his real motivation. If he went there to find himself, he succeeded. He lost himself as well.
A cameraman friend of mine remembers Anthony Loyd in Bosnia as friendly, modest and generous. These qualities might have driven an entirely worthy account of the Yugoslav wars. But it is Loyd's other side, his darkness, that makes this such an extraordinary and essential account. Prostitute the values of home, he writes, and "your wisdom multiplies". He hangs with crims and victims, romantics and murderers. In time his ignorance and cynicism metamorphisises to awareness, to rage, to disillusionment, and ultimately to his own dark clarity.
This is a helluva book about war, and of the high price of the knowledge of it.. It looks unflinchingly at atrocity, at notions of courage and idealism, at the instinct to attend wars that are none of your business, and the other instinct of powerful nations to avoid wars that should be their business.
It gives a belly-up view not only of the Bosnian conflict in all its varied guises, but of Chechnya as well. Loyd, inevitably, becomes a casualty himself. The sane man's response to such things is to act in an insane way. Heroin does it nicely.
Give this man a mug of sljivovica and a pillow for his head. The prices he has paid are his, but he has written a roiling, shrapnel-blasted cracker of a book that renders most everything else in the genre pale: a terrifying, compelling, inverse morality tale. It is indecent that awfulness on such a scale should be such a good read.
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My War Gone By, I Miss It So
My War Gone By, I Miss It So by Anthony Loyd (Paperback - 2001)
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