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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books!
When my teacher told us that we had to choose a book from her book list for our book reports, I had no idea what book to choose. After a while I finally chose this book, Eight Cousins. Once I started reading it, I couldn't put it down!!
The book is about the time when Rose Campbell's father died, and Rose went to live with her Aunt Peace and her Aunt Plenty , who...
Published on April 9 2003 by Leleh

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3.0 out of 5 stars Can I get Jamie in an adult size?
My friend's daughter was reading this recently, and I picked it up to see how it looked to me again. I read it when I was 8 or so, and liked it, but not enough to put in my regular rotation. I like the idea of such a close family, and the idea of seven boys living with a girl cousin and *not* giving her a hard time! Although the mores are ridiculously conservative by...
Published on April 19 2001 by Rilchiam


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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite books!, April 9 2003
By 
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
When my teacher told us that we had to choose a book from her book list for our book reports, I had no idea what book to choose. After a while I finally chose this book, Eight Cousins. Once I started reading it, I couldn't put it down!!
The book is about the time when Rose Campbell's father died, and Rose went to live with her Aunt Peace and her Aunt Plenty , who lived in a big house on Aunt Hill, until her uncle, her legal guardian, came for her. When Rose arrived she was a very sickly & scared girl. Her aunts didn't know what to do with her, and she was surrounded by 7 loud and wild boy cousins. When her savior/guardian, Uncle Alec arrives, she puts her full trust into him, and he helps overcome her fears, & turns her into a very pretty and healthy child. It wasn't long before Rose was as happy, healthy and lively as any of her cousins.
Don't worry, I didn't give away the ending, (the back of the book tells even more than this)! As I said before, this is one of the best books I have ever read, (I even cried a little at the end!!!).
ENJOY!!!!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars As Good As 'Little Women', Nov. 28 2002
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
This is the wonderful story of Rose Campbell, whom we first meet as a sickly and despondent 13-year-old orphan. She is grieving for her recently dead parents, and she tends to get the vapors and other Victorian women's ailments. Nevertheless, this shy, frail and delicate creature is sent to live on the "Aunt Hill" to be raised by six very opinionated aunts.
And that's not all. She is also surrounded by seven male cousins, as boisterous and full of life as they come. Rose's initial reaction is to wish herself dead. Barely able to lift her head, she is frightened and overwhelmed by the presence of her mischievous clan. But deep inside, she is secretly envious. The boys get to climb trees and run and play, while Rose, as all young women in her day, is confined to the parlor, constricted by tight corsets and impossible petticoats.
Along comes Uncle Mac, the doctor uncle whose view of how to raise girls clashes with his day and time--and all six of his sisters, the formidable aunts. In the character of Doctor Mac, Louisa May Alcott was able to tout her own family's avant garde views on women's health, almost a century ahead of its time. The doctor forbids Rose to wear the constricting corsets, to the horror of all her aunts and the girl herself. He wonders how she can feel healthy when she cannot draw a decent breath? He encourages her to play outside with her cousins, to get fresh air and exercise. He demands that she eat good, hearty meals instead of womanly morsels. And under his tutelage, and with the friendship of her wonderful cousins, Rose starts to bloom. She turns from a shy, sickly little mouse into a strong, outgoing young woman.
I loved this book as a child; I love it now. It has the perfect message for any girl of any age: Be yourself, take care of yourself, and nothing and nobody can stop you. In my view, "Eight Cousins" is Alcott's true masterpiece.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic Book, Aug. 21 2002
By 
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
I loved "Eight Cousins". You get to know the characters thoroughly by the end of the book-there is great description. Unlike most of Louisa May Alcott's books, this is about a rich girl-Rose Campbell. However, Rose gets to be so wholesome and so sweet that except at the beginning, you hardly notice her wealth. This book is about a girl, as I've said, whose name is Rose Campbell. She has lost her parents, but has quite enough relitives to take care of her. She has six aunts, four uncles, and seven boy cousins. To Rose, this last is a dreadful, and for she is fresh from a prim girl's boarding school, and before that lived with her invalid, solitary father until he died, she has never really seen any boys, and considers them to be some sort of wild animal. She is therefore unprepared to find her cousins gentlemanly and nice, although they are healthy, happy lads. There are Archie, the chief, Prince Charlie, Mac, the Bookworm, Steve the Dandy, the Brats, Geordie and Will, and Jamie, the baby. Rose's aunts all want to bring the girl up their own way, but fourtunatly Rose is entrusted to her Uncle Alec, a kind man who has ideas about health that astonish
Rose at first. However, they grow to love one another dearly. Rose's aunts are Peace, the sweet old lady who "wore no black, but soft, pale colors, as if always ready for the marrige that had never come", Aunt Plenty, "always trotting, she was a regular Martha", Aunt Clara, the fashionable woman who "had been a beauty and as belle, and was still a handsome woman", Aunt Jane, the one who is very severe, and always expects Rose to be studying, Aunt Myra, who has it as her hobby "to believe people were tottering on the brink of the grave, and, upon my word, was offended if people didn't fall into it"! and last but not least, sweet, kind Aunt Jessie, Uncle Alec and Rose's confidante. My favorite chapter was "Good Bargains", and my favorite characters were Phebe, an important one who I have not yet mentioned. Phebe is a healthy, kind girl who is a chamber maid, and "sings like a bird and works like a woman". I also liked the boys, the Aunts Jessie, Peace, and Plenty, Rose, and Uncle Alec. I would recommend this book to anyone, especially girls, age 9 and above. This is another of Louisa Alcott's best books!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful Suprise, Jan. 8 2002
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This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
I was 7 or 8 when I first picked this book out of the shelf at the local libary. I did not know a thing about other then that it was written by the Alcott. Having just finished Little Women I was eager to read more.
I found myself reading through the book very quickly, being drawn into Rose's world very quickly. Her advertures with her cousin were very refreshing. But two weeks passed quickly and the book was returned.
It was not until recently that I found a copy of this books and I quickly bought it. Rereading it I was again drawn into the world but was able to see so much more.
In a time where girls were taught to be ladies and were corsetts and not play, Alcott has creatred a throughly modern girl. Give Rose pants and put her in todays society and she could be any girl at all.
All of the characters are all fleshed out very well. Worm who even as a child I identified with since like him I am also a book worm.The Prince who rules them all and Jamie the baby who never fails to delight all in awe of their queen.
I would reccomend this book for any fan of Alcott, or someone who is just starting to enjoy the world of literature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Colorful Book for a Colorful Reader!, Aug. 15 2001
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
Eight Cousins in one of my favorite books! The stories behind the pages showsuspense and brilliance in every word. Please, reader, read this book, for you wont regret it! Rose Campbell has it all: wealth, brains, beauty, and kindness, well, she has every thing but a mother. But her father is kind and cherishes her beyond love, but then suddenly Rose is an orphan at her Aunts' house. Her many aunts all want custedy of her, but finaly, she is put into the hands of her Uncle Alec for a year. Alec is a kind and simple gentleman who gets rid of Roses corsets and things and though she is aghast at such notions, she soon becomes grateful for him. Then, seven boys come into the picture, though all gentlemen, still were boys! Rose dispises boys, but must learn to get along with them for the sake of Alec, for she is ready to do every thing possible for him. But after the year, through tragety and scorn, Rose finds that she can't tear away from them. This novel is possesive and ful of suspense and I recomend it with full heart. Sincerly, a reader of this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Colorful Book for a Colorful Reader!, Aug. 15 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
Eight Cousins in one of my favorite books! The stories behind the pages showsuspense and brilliance in every word. Please, reader, read this book, for you wont regret it! Rose Campbell has it all: wealth, brains, beauty, and kindness, well, she has every thing but a mother. But her father is kind and cherishes her beyond love, but then suddenly Rose is an orphan at her Aunts' house. Her many aunts all want custedy of her, but finaly, she is put into the hands of her Uncle Alec for a year. Alec is a kind and simple gentleman who gets rid of Roses corsets and things and though she is aghast at such notions, she soon becomes grateful for him. Then, seven boys come into the picture, though all gentlemen, still were boys! Rose dispises boys, but must learn to get along with them for the sake of Alec, for she is ready to do every thing possible for him. But after the year, through tragety and scorn, Rose finds that she can't tear away from them. This novel is possesive and ful of suspense and I recomend it with full heart. Sincerly, a reader of this book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Can I get Jamie in an adult size?, April 19 2001
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
My friend's daughter was reading this recently, and I picked it up to see how it looked to me again. I read it when I was 8 or so, and liked it, but not enough to put in my regular rotation. I like the idea of such a close family, and the idea of seven boys living with a girl cousin and *not* giving her a hard time! Although the mores are ridiculously conservative by today's standards, like when Rose got her ears pierced and they acted like she was a scarlet woman, it is nice to see adults trying to guide their children. As a Gen-Xer, who, like most of my peers, was plunked in front of the TV so it could raise me, it's comforting to see the aunts and uncles so involved in their charges' upbringing.
But what really stood out with me was the character of Jamie, the littlest boy, and Pokey, the even littler girl he calls his 'dolly'. He's so devoted to her (much as my husband is to me!) and always looks out for her, like when she fell in the river and he jumped in after her, even though she didn't need saving and he wasn't strong enough anyway. And when Rose was scolding Pokey for something and he yelled, "I hate you for making my Pokey cry!" my heart just melted! Can I get him in an adult size?
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5.0 out of 5 stars You'll fall in love with the characters as if you knew them., July 9 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
Rose Campbell is orphaned at age 13. She is left to her Uncle Alec, a kind man who is ahead of his time in thinking. She meets her seven cousins, all of whom are boys, and immediately becomes their queen. She has I beleive six aunts, each with its own individual character. When she arrives at "Aunt Hill" as the place is called due to all the aunts, she is a very pale, thin, and unhappy thing. Her uncle, Dr. Alec, tries an experiment for one year to get her healthy and happy. Some of the things he does would be shocking to that day and age, such as encouraging a girl, almost fourteen, to run, shout, and be strong! The very idea scandalous! The little chamber maid, Phebe, who herself is only a few years older than Rose, helps her to learn to be good, strong, and be merry in the face of unhappiness. The book is full of old morals which I enjoyed immensely. The old grammar and beleifs will surprise and amuse you. I recommend this book to people who like history, love a good novel rather than that sensation trash, or would just like to fall in love with the characters.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Bachelor Uncle to the Rescue, Sept. 6 2002
By 
Nobodymmmmm "cdm586" (Wasilla, AK United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
Rose is a sad little girl. Orphaned at the tender age of 13, she has been in the hands of several well-meaning but misguided aunts, all of whom are stifling her with their good intentions.
When Uncle Alec finally arrives on the scene, he vows to undue the damage done by the aunts. To that end, he demands one year to do with Rose as he will. If, at the end of that time, the results are not satisfactory to all, he will again concede control to the females.
Touching and sweet, most little girls will enjoy this book. I read it over and over as a child, and never tired of the antics of Rose's 7 boy cousins as they tried to please, entertain, and earn her favor. Reading it over again as an adult, I'd say there's nothing in this book to worry a parent. It's a good, wholesome story, and some of the lessons found inside it's pages still apply today.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Almost 30 and still read it at least twice a year!, April 20 2002
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This review is from: Eight Cousins (Paperback)
Ok, so I know I wrote a review nearly 3 years ago about Eight Cousins but I feel I must add to previous entry. This book has helped me mold my ideals and concepts of womanhood more than I ever had guessed. Rose develops many relationships with the characters in this book and from its pages I have learned how to be a good friend, sacrifice without receiving praise, take responsibility for a decisions and make ammends if I can, enter into conflict with those around me with a brave heart...determined to love even when friends are at their most UNlovable. This book helped teach me to come from great tradedy into a life of victory and peace. Don't let the fact that it was written in your great-great grandmother's age discourage you! It's a timeless piece that I hope will help mold our youth for generations to come.
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Eight Cousins
Eight Cousins by Louisa May Alcott (Paperback - Oct. 20 1995)
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