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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How could it be rated less than 5 stars?
This is a 5,000 year old poem, the first traces of which were discovered in 1839 by a young Englishman, Austen Layard, who was
intent upon working in Ceylon but on the way there he and a friend stopped at Nineveh, on the Tigris River, and began an excavation hoping to find inscriptions. They
found a library of clay tablets! What was to have been a few days...
Published on Oct. 17 2002 by Joseph H Pierre

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars The Journeys that will change his life.
A half god and half human, Gilgamesh was a King of the city of Uruk. Always wanting to find fame and knowledge, Gilgamesh set out on two Journeys in search of wide fame and for immortality. Gilgamesh's first journey was the forest journey. His goal was to defeat the gaurdian of the forest, Humbaba. After defeating Humbaba, Gilgamesh also defeated the Bull of Heaven...
Published on Oct. 22 1998


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How could it be rated less than 5 stars?, Oct. 17 2002
By 
Joseph H Pierre "Joe Pierre" (Salem, OR USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
This is a 5,000 year old poem, the first traces of which were discovered in 1839 by a young Englishman, Austen Layard, who was
intent upon working in Ceylon but on the way there he and a friend stopped at Nineveh, on the Tigris River, and began an excavation hoping to find inscriptions. They
found a library of clay tablets! What was to have been a few days excavation became
years. He subsequently brought back to London thousands of clay tablets with their wedge shaped cuneiforms, which were eventually
deciphered, including part of The Epic of Gilgamesh.

New finds in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by others, and their laborious interpretation followed. One of the results was this ancient epic poem, which contains,
among other things, one of the earliest tales of a great deluge and flood which is eerily similar to the flood described in the Hebrew Bible. The perpetrators of the flood,
though, were not the solitary God of the Hebrews, but one of the multiple Gods worshipped in those days, Enlil, god of earth, wind and air, and counselor to the other
Gods, of which there were a multitude.

Gilgamesh was the king of Uruk, a great city in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq.) Although blessed with remarkable beauty ("a perfect body") and great strength, he was
but two-thirds god and one third mortal--which does present some serious questions! The poem was his epic, and there was indeed an historical figure of the same
name.

This is an interesting artifact for its insight into human history, if nothing else. This particular translation is more bland in the explicit ... references, etc., than others,
but it faithfully retains the story.

A valuable piece of literature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars How could it be rated less than 5 stars?, Oct. 9 2002
By 
Joseph H Pierre "Joe Pierre" (Salem, OR USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
This is a 5,000 year old poem, the first traces of which were discovered in 1839 by a young Englishman, Austen Layard, who was
intent upon working in Ceylon but on the way there he and a friend stopped at Nineveh, on the Tigris River, and began an excavation hoping to find inscriptions. They found a library of clay tablets! What was to have been a few days excavation became
years. He subsequently brought back to London thousands of clay tablets with their wedge shaped cuneiforms, which were eventually
deciphered, including part of The Epic of Gilgamesh.

New finds in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries by others, and their laborious interpretation followed. One of the results was this ancient epic poem, which contains, among other things, one of the earliest tales of a great deluge and flood which is eerily similar to the flood described in the Hebrew Bible. The perpetrators of the flood, though, were not the solitary God of the Hebrews, but one of the multiple Gods worshipped in those days, Enlil, god of earth, wind and air, and counselor to the other Gods, of which there were a multitude.

Gilgamesh was the king of Uruk, a great city in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq.) Although blessed with remarkable beauty ("a perfect body") and great strength, he was but two-thirds god and one third mortal--which does present some serious questions! The poem was his epic, and there was indeed an historical figure of the same name.

Recently, in my home town, 8th-grade students were assigned the poem to study, in this very translation, but because of a rather innocuous passage referring to a "harlot" who used her blandishments, including a reference to her nakedness, to
influence a friend of Gilgamesh (Enkidu), the teacher was persuaded by an angry parent to black out the offending phrases, resulting a dispute over censorship which made headlines here.

Mountains out of molehills!

This is an interesting artifact for its insight into human history, if nothing else. This particular translation is more bland in the explicit sexual references, etc., than others, but it faithfully retains the story.

A valuable piece of literature.

Joe Pierre
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4.0 out of 5 stars 1500 years before Homer, Aug. 30 2002
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
The Epic of Gilgamesh is a fascinating tale of great historical importance. Composed 1500 years before Homer's epics, the story is one that modern man can readily understand and appreciate. Gilgamesh was the more than capable ruler of the ancient town of Uruk; his strength and physical beauty were unmatched by any in the land, and his subjects adored him. Although he possessed so much, Gilgamesh wanted desperately to live forever like a god. He was two-thirds god and one-third human, but he refused to accept his destiny to die. If it were his lot to die, he wanted to perform great deeds so that his name would never be forgotten.
The story opens with the story of Enkidu, a wild man of nature who was to become Gilgamesh's best friend and accompany him on his dangerous journeys. The first trip takes them to the Land of the Cedars where Gilgamesh sets out to kill Humbaba, the guardian of the forest. When he later slays the Bull of Heaven, the anger of the gods is turned upon him and Enkidu, leading to new suffering by Gilgamesh. In desperation, he seeks Utnapishtim in the land of the gods; Utnapishtim was granted eternal life after preserving mankind in the wake of a great flood. Gilgamesh again finds only heartache for his troubles. Returning to Uruk, he preserves the story of his journeys and deeds in writing, and it is, perhaps ironically, in this written record that Gilgamesh is recognized today for the great man he was.
One learns much about the ancient gods in this tale, and the story of the great goddess Ishtar's role in the related events is pretty amazing. When Ishtar invited Gilgamesh to be her husband, he issued forth a litany of former lovers whom Ishtar had turned out and cursed, boldly rebuffing Ishtar's advances. It is this brave act that led to most of Gilgamesh's later troubles. Even Enkidu, whose reported bravery is belied by his reluctance to aid his noble friend in several situations, is rather astonishingly disrespectful to the goddess.
N. K. Sandars does a remarkable job of putting the epic in its proper historical and literary perspective. A glossary of relevant gods and characters is particularly helpful. Along with providing a short history of the man, the gods, and the epic itself, she goes to great lengths to explain her method of producing this modern translation. There is no one extant copy of the Epic of Gilgamesh; a number of tablets, in varying degrees of condition and legibility and differing somewhat in the details of the story, have been compared and contrasted in order to produce the story as she presents it. Perhaps the most useful part of the introduction is an explanation of the form and style of the text. The text was originally told in verse, and Sandars explains that she chose to produce the text in narrative form in the interest of readability. As the order of events is not universally agreed upon, she explains why she chose the order she did for events. One annoying feature of the text, at least to the modern reader, is the constant word for word repetition of speeches between characters, and Sandars does the reader a great service by alerting him/her to this and explaining the rationale behind its use by the ancient writers.
The Epic of Gilgamesh is one of the oldest written texts in history, yet its theme is timeless, its characters all too human, and its appeal universal. Sandars' modern, narrative translation transforms the historically important epic into an eminently readable, quite enjoyable story. The tale of a great flood in this incredibly ancient tale has raised eyebrows ever since the text was discovered. The parallels to the Biblical tale of Noah are obvious, adding great strength to the argument that the legend or memory of a cataclysmic flood was common to diverse cultures in the ancient Near East. Those familiar with the ideas of Zechariah Sitchin will find this story especially fascinating and illuminating.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The epic tale of Gilgamesh, the great king of Uruk, Nov. 28 2001
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
The Epic of Gilgamesh dates from the third millennium B.C., making it the oldest epic poem in world literature. It is a relatively short work, which explains why over half of this little volume introduces the ancient text of the first ancient hero. The fullest extant text of the Gilgamesh was found in the Akkadian-language on 12 incomplete clay tablets found at Nineveh in the library of the Assyrian King Ashurbanipal. The narrative gaps have been filled in, somewhat, by fragments found elsewhere. Historians think that Gilgamesh might have been a ruler in southern Mesopotamia, although there is no historical evidence for any of the exploits covered in this narrative or the five poems written about the hero. Cultural anthropologists believe that Gilgamesh was a great king whose name became associated with pretty much every major legend or mythical tale in that culture.
Unlike some translations that go tablet by tablet, this translation by N. K. Sandars breaks the epic down into six main narratives. The two most famous of these would be "The Story of the Flood," with its obvious parallels to the stories of a great flood in the Bible and Ovid's "Metamorphoses," and "The Coming of Enkidu"/"Ishtar and Gilgamesh, and the Death of Enkidu," which Captain Jean-Luc Picard narrates in the Star Trek: Next Generation episode "Darmok." Both of these are relevant points because in working from the known to the unknown they are both avenues of introducing Gilgamesh to which students will readily await. The Epic of Gilgamesh is the fundamental mythic tale in Western Civilization, but tends to be relegated to the shelf in most classes unless in happens to be included in an anthology. His quests for the Spring of Youth and immortality have been echoed in so many other tales. I have always thought that Gilgamesh is a more important figure than Beowulf, but that would be a decidedly minority opinion. I just wish this little volume was not so expensive because I think that hurts its utility in classes dealing with mythology, legend and/or folklore.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Straightforward Morality-Play Epic, Sept. 26 2001
By 
Donald Ford (dford@midrivers.com) (Lavina, Montana United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
The Epic Of Gilgamesh, which pre-dates Homer by some 1,500 years, somehow survived on clay tablets and was translated in the 1800's. It tells the story of Gilgamesh, 2/3 god and 1/3 man, king of Uruk.
In the beginning of the story, Gilgamesh is a strong king, building an amazing and beautiful city. However, the people are unhappy with him because he takes all sons from their fathers and leaves no virgin to her lover. There being no man alive who can contend with Gilgamesh, Aruru (a goddess of creation) made Enkidu, a man-beast strong enough for Gilgamesh to respect. After a harlot sleeps with Enkidu, he leaves the forest and comes to town to find Gilgamesh. The two wrestle, and after some time, Gilgamesh is finally able to throw down Enkidu. But Enkidu's strength is admired by Gilgamesh and the two become as brothers.
Wanting to forever keep his name the mightiest, Gilgamesh goes with Enkidu and slays the guardian of the cedar forest, Humbaba. This act greatly angered the god Enlil - and this act would ultimately bring great heartache to Gilgamesh.
The goddess Ishtar was impressed with Gilgamesh's actions, and she asked him to be her lover. But Gilgamesh then rattled off a list of all the men she had hurt and her wicked actions, and gave her a "thanks, but no thanks." Angered, she had Anu create the Bull of Heaven, which attacked Gilgamesh and Enkidu. They eventually slay the bull, but victory is fleeting. In the aftermath, Enlil gets revenge by sickening Enkidu with a deathly illness.
Gilgamesh now goes on a long journey, seeking everlasting life. He visits Utnapishtim, man of everlasting life. Utnapishtim tells Gilgamesh about the great flood that wiped out most all of the world - save for what was on his ark. For preserving life on earth, Utnapishtim was given eternal life. But for Gilgamesh to be young again, he must recover a flower at the bottom of the sea. he gets it, but it's quickly taken away by a serpent. Everlasting life is not to be Gilgamesh's lot.
He returns home, and is exalted as the greatest king ever. Gilgamesh lears important lessons about justice and mortality. His journeys and experiences have truly made him a great king.
While redundant at points, this is an amazing tale, told in a straightforward manner that makes it a swift and compelling read. A truly amazing work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The greatest story ever told?, Sept. 24 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
The Epic of Gilgamesh is an ancient story-- perhaps 4 thousand to 5 thousand years old. Originating in ancient Sumeria, it spread throughout the Near East and the version we have has been reconstructed from Akkadian, Babylonian, Hittite, and Hurrian translations inscribed on clay tablets. Its themes and motifs (including a divinely ordained Great Flood) influenced the development of other great poetic works and mythological traditions, including those of ancient Egypt, Israel, and Greece.
The story here is mythic and powerful. I won't try to summarize it other than to say that it raises truly timeless questions about what it means to be human-- questions about love sex and friendship, about nature and civilization, of the simple joys in life and about our desire to do great deeds, about our fear of death and the impossiblity of escaping it.
There is much about this story that may seem archaic, naive, and odd to first-time readers, ranging from the description of Gilgamesh as 2/3 god, 1/3 mortal (which may perplex folks who try to work out how that can happen hereditarily speaking), to the repetivite narrative voice that stem from the conventions of orally performed poetry (which does seem a bit odd when being *read* silently in a book). However, once one learns to see beyond these curious features, it is apparent that _The Epic of Gilgamesh_, as it has come down to us, is a brilliant and clever piece of poetic craftsmanship and storytelling. The use of recurrent images and motifs, the narrative symmetries and ironies (e.g. how, after Enkidu's death, Gilgamesh leaves the city, puts on animal furs, and goes off into the wilderness... becoming much like Enkidu was at the beginning of the story). In truth, I would not hesitate to say that the _Epic of Gilgamesh_ is, from a poetic point of view, as complex and sophisticated as any of Shakespeare's plays.
The Penguin edition of the poem, I should add, offers a loose prose translation that is quite satisfactory and extremely readable. Those who are more interested in the stylistic qualities of the original may prefer a more literal translation, while those more interested in the history of the poem and its sources, may prefer a more scholarly edition-- but for the general or first time reader, Sandars' edition should be more than suitable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A profound and moving tale that holds many mysteries., June 14 2001
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH : An English Version with an Introduction by N. K. Sandars. Penguin Classics Revised Edition. 128 pp. London : Penguin, 1972 (1964) and Reissued.
Although many perhaps don't realize it, we live in a truly great age of translations, being awash in an abundance of texts that would have been the envy of earlier readers. The classics of every age and every culture - or those that have survived the hazards of time - are freely available in all kinds of versions. These range from the productions of outstanding scholars learned in the ancient languages, all the way the way through to the adaptations and reworkings of non-specialist enthusiasts, some of whom can also be very scholarly in their approach.
I don't really know how many translations of Gilgamesh are currently available, but the newcomer could do worse than select that of Sandars. He freely admits that his "isn't a fresh translation from the cuneiform" because such a translation would require a detailed knowledge of Sumerian, Akkadian and Hittite, a task which he tells us he is not competent to undertake (page 50).
He adds that extensively annotated and accurate scholarly translations exist in English, French, and German, but that these hardly suit the needs of the ordinary reader. He himself, however, has made full use of them in preparing his own version, a version which as an ordinary reader myself I've always found wonderfully readable.
His book falls into two parts. First we are given a 50-page Introduction which I personally found to be quite interesting and informative, although predictably conventional in its interpretations. Sandars accepts the standard definition of the Sumerian word DIN.GIR as meaning "god" or "gods," as do almost all others who write on Ancient Mesopotamia, though readers of Zecharia Sitchin will have their doubts (see Sitchin, 12th Planet, p.169).
Following the Introduction we are given the text of Gilgamesh, mainly in Sandars' lucid and sensitive prose, though with a few passages in verse. The book is rounded out with a 'Glossary of Names,' and an 'Appendix of Sources' which gives full bibliographical details of the scholarly sources utilized by Sandars. It also includes a useful map, and is printed in a large and easy-to-read type.
As a non-specialist Sumerophile I like Sandars' text and have re-read it several times. Here is an example of his verse, with my obliques added to indicate line breaks:
"Hear me, great ones of Uruk, / I weep for Enkidu, my friend, / Bitterly moaning like a woman mourning / I weep for my brother. / O Enkidu, my brother, / You were the axe at my side, / My hand's strength, the sword in my belt, / The shield before me, / A glorious robe, my fairest ornament; / An evil fate has robbed me..." (page 94).
Others may have rendered this passage better, but to me it effectively communicates the despair any man would feel at the loss of his closest friend. There are other similarly moving incidents in this strange and compelling story, a story which is essentially tragic though not unrelieved with an occasional bit of humor.
Here is an example of Sandars' prose:
"My friend, I saw a third dream and this dream was altogether frightful. The heavens roared and the earth roared again, daylight failed and darkness fell, lightnings flashed, fire blazed out, the clouds lowered, they rained down death. Then the brightness departed, the fire went out, and all was turned to ashes fallen about us. . . . (page 79).
Gilgamesh was sleeping when this experience occurred, but I wonder if "dream" here really means "dream"? Perhaps, but what this passage evokes vividly for me is an ancient man's experience of being very close to the site of the launching of a huge rocket (See Zechariah Sitchin, 'The Stairway to Heaven,' p.127). Everything seems to be there - the roarings, the flashings, the dark clouds of smoke from the exhaust, the fall of a residue of "ashes" from the firing. I wonder if a modern witness of a Cape Canaveral launch could do as well . . .
Gilgamesh's tragedy is that he was partly human : "... the great gods made his beauty perfect.... Two thirds they made him god and one third man" (page 61). But who were these "gods" whose lifespans were so much longer than those of humans? And how did they make Gilgamesh two thirds "god"? Did the Sumerians just dream all this up for purposes of 'entertainment' ? Or were they more accurate reporters than they are credited with being ?
The Sumerians were adamant in asserting that they themselves created nothing at all, neither agriculture nor irrigation nor architecture nor engineering nor astronomy nor mathematics nor writing nor anything else, but that their _entire_ civilization was given to them by the "gods."
Of this civilization we find Gilgamesh lamenting : "Here in the city man dies oppressed at heart, man perishes with despair in his heart" (page 72). But would human beings have deliberately created a system in which widespread despair was unavoidable? Or was something else responsible for establishing the civilizational patterns that, as a reading of Samuel Kramer's 'History Begins at Sumer' will convince anyone, are still ours? Is "civilization" a euphemism for a non-human system of exploitation?
There are many mysteries in this profound and moving tale of Gilgamesh's friendship with the wild man Enkidu, his frustration over the human lot, and his courageous attempt and failure to discover a solution. But whether you read his story in Sandars' version or in some other, make sure to read it. It's a story you will not easily forget.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Gilgamesh and Enkidu at Uruk, June 12 2001
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
Dating from the third millennium B.C., "The Epic of Gilgamesh" is one of the earliest surviving epic poems in world literature, and like some of its obvious counterparts, to wit, Homer's "Iliad" and "Odyssey," Virgil's "Aeneid," and "Beowulf," still has the power to attract and fascinate readers even at the dawn of the 21st century. Like "Beowulf," Gilgamesh is a king whose initial goal is to establish his own eternal fame.
Gilgamesh, the child of a goddess and a priest, is, at the start of the epic, driving the people of Uruk crazy with his boundless energy and restless enthusiasm. The people beseech the gods to send a companion for their king. This companion comes in the form of Enkidu, a wild man who communes with beasts in the forest. Gradually, Gilgamesh and Enkidu become the closest of friends. While the search for fame and glory continues, it becomes only too clear that the focal point of the epic is the relationship between the king and the wild man. Without peers or equals, the two live almost exclusively for each other and through each other. Other ancient epics, of course, feature complicated relationships, but "Gilgamesh" is rare in the sheer intensity of the homosocial bond.
The wanderings and quests of Gilgamesh and Enkidu find their highest purpose in the pursuit of eternal life, which, again, surfaces because of Gilgamesh's relationship with Enkidu. Mortality becomes the overarching theme of the epic. A theme which we continue to deal with, the epic intersects the drive of science, pseudoscience, and magic throughout human history.
Stylistically, the most notable feature of "Gilgamesh" is repetition of phrases. Even in conversation, one sees the same sentence, sometimes modified, come from two or more characters, even at relatively great distance from each other in the actual text. This demonstrates very powerfully the oral origins of the epic. Repetition, which could become tiresome, draws us further into the story, as it forces us to pay closer attention to the significance of what is being said, as well as important numbers (7 and 12 appear most frequently), and images.
The adventures of Gilgamesh and Enkidu amongst gods, beasts, and natural forces, are compelling, interesting reading. Certain parallels between the ancient Mesopotamian epic and the Judeo-Christian biblical narratives that post-date it, have been well-documented. N.K. Sandars' introduction is extremely detailed, giving the history of the region surrounding Uruk, the history of the text itself and how it has been read, compiled, and studied since the 19th century, provides excellent background on the complicated mythology of the ancient Mesopotamians. A solid read altogether.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Epic of Gilgamesh and Life, Dec 1 2000
By 
Jeffrey (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
Not only one of the best pieces of literature of our time, but a timeless treasure, surviving through the ages. The epic of Gilgamesh, is one of the oldest known scriptures ever written by the human hand. Yet still the epic captivates audiences and the reader while still delivering a powerful and meaningful message about our humanity. The epic itself is one of the most interesting accounts of a Sumerian hero. However the language of the unknown author has the capacity to move, and to entice. The novel continually involves the reader, even from the beginning, with a question. It asks the reader to identify with the characters as if they were the characters and to still remember the ultimate lesson of life, to enjoy. Not only addressing the elements to keep a reader's attention, but revealing powerful and important aspects of being human. Among these is to understand ones place, and to realize that life is only what we make it, and how we live it. The Epic of Gilgamesh remains to be one of the most captivating and enlightening poems that still even today depicts plot, action, and insight.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gilgamesh links the Ancient World with the Modern World., Nov. 25 1999
By 
Walter Chang (Anaheim, Ca USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh (Paperback)
I very much enjoyed reading the Epic of Gilgamesh, and I must write a review to do this book justice. I will only discuss its content peripherally to allow people who haven't read it to discover its pleasures for themselves. Despite thousands of years of social and technological changes that separate the ancient and modern worlds, Gilgamesh definitively illustrates the similarities that humans of all ages share. Who doesn't desire to become more than average and to test his or her limits? Don't people yearn for a friend whom they can trust implicitly? And how many of us must eventually confront and despair about our mortality?
I can just imagine a cold night in the desert thousands of years ago, where a group of people gathered together to listen attentively to the exploits of Gilgamesh. As the storyteller reenact the epic members of the audience feel their emotions alternate between elation and grief.
I hope that prospective readers of this book will not pass it by. It is world literature.
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Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh
Penguin Classics Epic Of Gilgamesh by N K Sandars (Paperback - June 24 2003)
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