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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is Jane Eyre, sir
It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let...
Published on Jan. 11 2009 by E. A Solinas

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Norton edition
I had bought the norton edition of Jane Eyre with the hope that it would help me in understanding some of the more abstruse religious symbols, quotes, and confounding vocabulary used in the novel. However I have to say that the extra footnotes were mostly irrelevant and did not serve the purpose. To anyone thinking of buying the norton edition, my advice is to save the...
Published on March 30 2011 by Eyre


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Bronte Masterpiece: The Best Edition, Feb. 14 2004
By 
Rudy Avila "Saint Seiya" (Lennox, Ca United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Jane Eyre (Mass Market Paperback)
Written in 1847 by the woman writer Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre remains a classic of 19th century literature. This novel was one of the finest of its time and what made it all the more incredible was that it was written by a woman. Charlotte Bronte and her sisters, the Brontes, were British women who grew up in Yorkshire, the English countryside. To kill time when they were bored in the domestic and boarding-school ambiance, they wrote great works of literature. It's a must read for young women, but also for men and young males (preferably in the high school or college level) Jane Eyre is ultimately a literary novel and only a literary-minded intellectual can truly enjoy it for the masterpiece that it is. It ranks among the greatest works of English fiction, taking its place with the other male greats- Shakespeare and Charles Dickens. Curl up, warm up some tea or coffee, put on some mood music and read this incredibly engaging book. In this edition, we get commentary and preface by noted scholars.
Jane Eyre has been scrutinized time and again. It is understood by many that the heroine Jane is Charlotte Bronte herself. It's partially autobiographical in some portions- Charlotte Bronte did grow up in lowly conditions and was in boarding school that was cold and freezing. Charlotte did love a married man who was older than her, though nothing came of it of course. Jane Eyre, a feisty, spirited young orphan, is taken away from her home where her wicked aunt and cousins mistreat her. She is taken to a boarding school for girls until she comes of age. She lands a job as a governess for the eccentric and mysterious Mr. Rochester, who is hardly ever at home and takes care of his daughter Adele, teaching her to read and write, etc. But the mystery surrounding Mr. Rochester's past becomes a present reality in Jane Eyre's own life. Furthermore, Mr. Rochester and Jane Eyre fall in love. A novel that is inspired by Gothic fiction, it is strewn with Gothic, supernatural and suspenseful atmosphere and symbolism. The tree that is struck by lightning is a warning for Jane Eyre to leave Mr. Rochester's mansion, the strange cries in the attic later turn out to be Mr. Rochester's first wife, the crazed Bertha. A fire destroys the mansion and Mr. Rochester ends up diabled and blind. Bittersweet though the ending is, Jane Eyre and the blind Mr. Rochester marry and live happily, after much water under the bridge. This novel is a long read and should take up at least a whole summer, but it's very worth reading. It's a classic. Time and again, it will appear on the list of reading material for high school and college courses. And a bit of advice- dont' just read it to pass a class, get into the story. You will score even more points.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gothic Romance Classic, Oct. 3 2009
By 
Dave_42 "Dave_42" (Australia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
On October 16th, of 1847, "Jane Eyre: An Autobiography", edited by Currier Bell (pseudonym of Charlotte Brontë) was published. It created some controversy at the time, as many believed it was written by a man. The novel was very popular when published, but critical reaction to it varied. Today, it is clearly a classic, the development of a young woman, who does not fit into the stereotype of a nineteenth century woman. She is not submissive, and she struggles to avoid being dependent on others. The original publication was in three volumes, but this Penguin Classics edition is based on the third edition of Jane Eyre, and it is the last edition which Charlotte Brontë edited and corrected.

The story covers Jane's life from her childhood until her marriage. The childhood chapters can be split into two sections, those where Jane, an orphan, was being raised by her Uncle's family, but her uncle has passed away and her aunt does not like her, but was forced to promise to take care of her. The key parts of this section are Jane's being rejected by the closest thing she has to a family, her morality, and her independence, i.e. her refusal to conform. The second part of her childhood is when she is sent to attend a charity school, called Lowood, where the pupils have to make do with substandard food and clothing. Here Jane finds one teacher who treats her, and the other students, well, Miss Maria Temple. One of the key things in this section is the difference between religion and morality, symbolized by Mr. Brocklehurst a clergyman who is mostly responsible for the appalling conditions at Lowood, and Jane and Miss Temple on the side of morality. Also key is Jane's witnessing her friend, Helen Burns, dying from a typhus epidemic, in spite of her goodness and her submission to the standards imposed by Mr. Brocklehurst and Miss Scatcherd, a teacher as cruel as Miss Temple is kind.

The story then picks up many years later, with Jane in position as a teacher at Lowood, but looking to move on. She advertises for a position as a governess and is hired by Mrs. Fairfax. She is to take care of Adèle Varens, a girl who is being taken care of by Mr. Rochester, the master of Thornfield Manor where Mrs. Fairfax is the housekeeper. This section has a lot to do with class, as well as morality. There is the difficulty of Jane falling in love with someone of a different class. There is also the looking down on Jane as being of a lower class, by Mr. Rochester's peers. The morality questions are here to, in the comparison of the higher classes verses that of the lower class. Even Mr. Rochester's behavior is in question, in the events leading up to Jane leaving. Jane also finds out that she does have family left, and when it appears that she is to have everything, she sends a letter to her father's brother. It is this attempt to reconnect with family that causes her to lose nearly everything as it destroys what she thought she was about to have.

The next section details Jane's life after leaving Thornfield Manor. Here she loses almost everything, and is on death's door when she is on the doorstep of Moor House. The Rivers, St. John, Diana, and Mary. It is from this state of having nothing from which she recovers almost everything she could want. Here she recovers her health, she is employed again and regains much of her independence. St. John is in love with a woman, but he will not ask her because he is driven to devote his life to religion. He does find out Jane's true identity though, and this results in Jane learning she has family, and wealth that she didn't know she had. She is pressured by St. John to marry him and join him in his missionary life, but she knows that he doesn't love her. She rejects St. John, and instead goes to find her one love, Mr. Rochester. She now has wealth and family, and she learns that tragedies in Mr. Rochester's life have made what was once impossible possible.

It is a long and winding road which Jane travels in this novel. Probably best classified as a gothic romance, it deals with numerous issues and the strength of Jane's character serves as a good role model for young women, and for that matter anyone. The Penguin Classics edition is filled with supporting documentation as always. There is a wonderful introduction by Stevie Davies, along with a Chronology, suggestions for further reading, notes on the text, opinions of the press, and wonderful textual notes which enhance the reading experience and understanding of the reader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASIC BOOK, July 18 2004
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This review is from: Jane Eyre (Paperback)
This book is one of my favorite books of all time. It is well thoughout and the story line is well developed through the whole book. It is such an interesting story you will never get bored of it. I would highly recommend everyone to read this book if you enjoy an interesting, serious, and creative book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Jane Eyre, Bronte's Best, Jan. 9 2012
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This review is from: Jane Eyre (Paperback)
I studied the novel Jayne Eyre while in high-school and loved it. Since then I have re-read it several times and have also seen four different versions of the movie plus a musical. I recently purchased a second copy of the novel to give to my sister as a gift along with the DVD Jane Eyre.

Therese
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Story, Feb. 20 2011
By 
A. De Palma "crazy auntie" (canada) - See all my reviews
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This is my favourite novel, and I have many editions of this text. This one came with many great discussion questions for classes or book groups. This will make a great addtion to anyone's collection, whether you're a lover of classic literature, or want a great story to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars All Jane Eyre lovers desiring sequels - Read this review!, Jan. 18 2010
Jane Eyre being my favourite book, I have read any sequels, prequels or spin-offs that I could find:
- Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, which tells the story from Bertha's point of view, including her time in the West Indies.
- Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier. It is similar in the sense that the second Mrs. DeWinter in the book is haunted by the unseen presence of the first Mrs. DeWinter, just as Jane hears the maniacal cries of Bertha. There is the fact that Maxim is much older than the second Mrs. DeWinter, just as Rochester is much older than Jane. Then, finally there is the fire that destroys their stately old mansion, Manderley.
- The Ivy Tree by Mary Stewart. The parallels in that story are not as clear at first, but there is the young girl who falls in love with an already married man, and who runs away to escape from it all, and also the fire, and the destruction of an old majestic tree.
- a scifi version - Jenna Starborn by Sharon Shinn. In plot and structure it was almost exactly the same, following Brontë's narrative scene by scene, except for the transposition to a far-off planet in the distant future. I didn't think it was different enough, though, from the original to make it interesting in its' own right.
- How Nancy Drew Saved My Life by Lauren Baratz-Logsted. Even with the misleading Nancy Drew reference in the title, reading the book it was clear that it was Jane Eyre in the modern day in Iceland.
- The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde was a very different sort of take-off. It is a book that defies genre description - is it mystery, romance, alternative history, fantasy, or scifi? I think the consensus must be that it combines elements of them all. In this book, which takes place in a 1985 England still in the throes of the Crimean War, spec ops agent Thursday Next enters the world of fiction, and ends up changing the end of Jane Eyre to the conclusion we know today, for which we must profoundly thank her. (Nobody wanted Jane to end up with frigid St. John.)
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4.0 out of 5 stars A 19th century masterpiece, Feb. 27 2005
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This review is from: Jane Eyre (Paperback)
Jane Eyre is one of the classics of 19th century English literature. It is not possible to judge the book by to-day's literary standards: books must be judged in their own time and social setting. The language is, at times, tedious, and the plot absurd - with impossible coincidences, but, to English reader of the mid 19th century, these were accepted and demanded. The characters are well drawn and the atmosphere is vivid. Miss Eyre is a strong character who proves that the good and honest will prevail in God's good time. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to gain a better appreciation of the evolution of literature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars verrry verrry good!!!!, July 15 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Jane Eyre (Paperback)
this book made me laugh and made me cry. i cannot believe that she ran away...cant get over it. awesome, though. oh, and has anyone else noticed that on the front of the Dover Thrift edition it says that Jane Eyre is by Emily Bronte? anyone else notice that?...
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5.0 out of 5 stars a timeless tale that will be around forever., July 6 2004
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This review is from: Jane Eyre (Mass Market Paperback)
I first read Jane Eyre when I was thirteen, and I fell in love with it almost instantly as soon as I finished the first chapter. As you follow Jane's hardships from her troubled childhood through to her near-doomed relationship with the dark, brooding, and deathly handsome Rochester, you feel as if those hardships were your own. After all, aren't we all plain Jane Eyre's at times?
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5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, June 22 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Jane Eyre (Paperback)
I really loved this novel.......a classic that is still great today. It's a lot more plot driven than your average classic making it an easier read than you would think. When the plot is slower, the rich language is enough to keep you engrossed. I'm a big Jane Austen fan; C. Bronte is a really good author for those who've exhausted Austen's works. She is definitely darker, but just as great!
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Penguin Classics Jane Eyre
Penguin Classics Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (Hardcover - Oct. 26 2010)
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