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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love's Barriers Delightfully Probed in Polite Conversation
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with...
Published on Feb. 22 2008 by Donald Mitchell

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Still reading
I'm not finished reading this book. I'm sure it will be great and I will pass it on to my husband to read
Published 10 months ago by Maureen M Lien


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love's Barriers Delightfully Probed in Polite Conversation, Feb. 22 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Paperback)
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Favorite Book of All Time...., May 28 2004
By 
K. A. Stevenson "WIAPilot" (Tucson) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Mass Market Paperback)
Over the years, I have read "Persuasion" by Jane Austen at LEAST 10 times. Simply put, it is my favorite book. While not everyone holds this novel with the same high esteem that I do, I urge those who have NOT read "Persuasion" to buy it.
This book has meant different things to me at different times in my life. I have often reflected why I find the story so fascinating and believe it is because it so accurately portrays the human spirit and exposes our flaws and strengths with such transparency.
Jane Austen reveals those who are so superficial that they see no goodness or worth other than beauty and wealth (Anne's father and sister); those who are so dependent that they do not listen to their own heart - but instead leave their most important decisions for others to make (Anne herself); and those whose pride has been wounded.
And perhaps what is so captivating, Austen lets the reader vicariously "undo" an error in judgment. This is an excellent and timeless novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not Austen's best, Aug. 18 2003
By 
Ganime B. Akin (Istanbul, Turkey) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Paperback)
As an avid fan of Jane Austen, I began reading "Persuasion" with great expectations. Although I cannot say I am dissapointed, I must admit I did not like Persuasion as much as Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility.
First of all, although I sympathized with Anne when he was slighted by her own family and she was taken no notice of in the company of foolish women just because she is not as pretty and "fragile" as them, maybe because she is not as strong and passionate a character as Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, I could not particularly attach myself to her. Still, I read the novel from beginning to the end in a very short time because it has more than enough to keep our interest. Especially the character of Mrs. Croft, the sister of Captain Wentworth is worth notice; because among the "ailing" and "fatigued" women of the higher classes of that time, this woman who walks long distances with her husband, who accompanies him on long sea journeys and takes the reins of their carriage to manoeuvre out of the way of a post is very interesting. In this novel, Jane Austen says quiet a lot of things which can be thought quiet feministic. Well she says similar things in P&P, for example she makes Darcy say that Elizabeth's complexion is greatly improved after a long walk, when Bingley's sisters criticize her for such an unlady-like behaviour.
Another thing about the novel is that we don't really know the feelings of Captain Wentworth. It is true that the letter he writes to Anne at the end is full of love but I didn't feel his passion as I did Darcy's when he proposed to Elizabeth the first time.
All in all, I recommend the book to readers who have read Austen's other novels. But as a first read it may not be so enjoyable as Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Still reading, June 12 2013
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This review is from: Persuasion (Kindle Edition)
I'm not finished reading this book. I'm sure it will be great and I will pass it on to my husband to read
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Romance for Adults, March 2 2013
By 
Jeffrey Tedford "poetrylover 3" (St Louis MO USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Kindle Edition)
This is a novel about second chances. The characters never elude the consequences of their mistakes, yet age has granted the wisdom to make better choices, becoming truer to the self. Persuasion is one of my favorite novels (out of the literally thousands I've read over the years)and certainly my favorite Jane Austen. Persuasion
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5.0 out of 5 stars beautiful book, Jan. 28 2013
This review is from: Persuasion (Kindle Edition)
My favourite book! I have read Persuasion 5 times, and the more I read it the more I appreciate Jane Austen's genius.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Austen's Finest Novel, March 12 2012
Persuasion is Austen's last completed and finest novel. A poignant story of quiet regret and a lament for missed opportunities, Persuasion tells of dutiful, neglected Anne Elliot and her heartbroken suitor Captain Wentworth as they reunite eight and a half years after she refused his marriage proposal. Excellent!!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love's Barriers Delightfully Probed in Polite Conversation, Feb. 22 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Love's Barriers Delightfully Probed in Polite Conversation, Feb. 22 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Persuasion (Paperback)
Persuasion is Jane Austen's most sophisticated story and writing. She lovingly and incisively demonstrates the problems of being a well-bred sensitive person in a society that's more intrigued by social standing, money, and polite conversation than by good character.

Persuasion is Anne Elliot's story. The title's initial allusion is to Anne's brush with matrimony when a promising, but not rich, naval officer, Captain Wentworth, proposed and she fell in love with him at 19. But Anne's deceased mother's friend, Lady Russell, persuaded Anne not to make the match. Up until the time of the story, Anne hasn't had another suitor and she's now well past the usual age of marriage at 29 and "her bloom had vanish early." Her father's spendthrift ways mean that Anne could bring little money to a marriage so she's expecting not to marry.

While in her social class that lack of a husband is a drawback, in reality her family is a greater problem. Her father, Sir Walter Elliot, is a baronet who spends too much money, is obsessed by social rank, loves to be around the "beautiful people" and admire himself in a mirror, and keeps company with an unsuitable, scheming widow, Mrs. Clay, who is looking for a husband and has latched onto Elizabeth as friend. Anne's older sister, Elizabeth, is also unmarried and is as equally obsessed with social status as their father. Both Sir Walter and Elizabeth fail to value Anne and looked to her to suit their conveniences. The other daughter, Mary, is married but the connection doesn't thrill either Sir Walter or Elizabeth. Mary sees Anne as a virtual servant who should wait on her every beck and call when Anne is her guest.

Due to Sir Walter's over spending of his income, it is decided he will rent the family estate, Kellynch Hall, while he, Elizabeth, and Anne take up less expensive quarters and a reduced social life in Bath. This change sets lots of new events into motion, not the least of which is Anne being re-introduced to Captain Wentworth who now has a fortune and seems to be looking for a lively, young wife. Only their common commitment to being polite makes time in one another's company tolerable. What strong emotions burn under the surface? She's very embarrassed, but Captain Wentworth is hard to read.

In the course of the book, you'll find out a lot about social climbing in Regency England, the finances of the social elites and those who were up-and-coming, how marriage agreements were struck, and how the naval officers differed from the gentry. You'll also be impressed, I'm sure, by the patina of politeness that served as a social lubricant among people who often didn't care a trifle for one another.

In such a society, people mostly wore masks of being thoughtful, considerate people while in reality they were seldom thinking about very much and didn't care much for others. Anne Elliot is the exception in that her heart and mind are actually devoted to the service of others.

One of the most interesting parts of the story is how it was possible (mostly by accident) to sort out the phonies from among those with glittering manners.

Anne Elliot is one of the most memorable and admirable characters in English literature. Do read this book and find out about the other kinds of persuasion that took place during this year of her fictional life. You'll be delighted that you did.
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5.0 out of 5 stars très instructifs en détails, April 6 2005
This review is from: Persuasion (Mass Market Paperback)
Je me suis mise dans la peau du personnage principale et ce fut un régal de visiter en imagination par contre, le livre ne rentre pas dans le sujet vite plutôt en longueur c'est un tantinet énervant. Quel est le livre qui vient après JUVENILIA
j'aimerais le savoir pour pouvoir me le procurer? merci D'avance!
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Penguin Classics Persuasion
Penguin Classics Persuasion by Jane Austen (Hardcover - Dec 20 2011)
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