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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First Animal Rights Book...
Because it is a well-known classic and a children's perennial favorite, many people do not realize that "Black Beauty" is an impassioned plea for animal rights, written at a time when such a notion was dismissed as ridiculous. And because it is what it is, sensitive children may need a parent to explain that, thankfully, most of the abuses described in the book are long...
Published on May 3 2002 by Wendy Kaplan

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Black Beauty
This book is brill it made me cry laugh and somtimes even jump up and down! It's about a horse that has a number of adventures and it discribes all his friends on the way. If you are looking for a book that makes you laugh and cry, this has to be it!
Published on July 15 2001


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First Animal Rights Book..., May 3 2002
Because it is a well-known classic and a children's perennial favorite, many people do not realize that "Black Beauty" is an impassioned plea for animal rights, written at a time when such a notion was dismissed as ridiculous. And because it is what it is, sensitive children may need a parent to explain that, thankfully, most of the abuses described in the book are long gone, thanks in part to crusaders like Anna Sewell.
In a story that takes place in 19th century England, a gorgeous glossy black colt, who comes to be known as Black Beauty, is born into a life of comfort and kindness. His life is a kind of horsey paradise, until the fortunes of his owners turn...and Black Beauty is sold.
Sold to a cruel owner as a cab horse, Beauty is now treated as so many hapless animals were in his day...he is virtually tortured. He is in constant pain. His knees are sore. He is made to wear a "check rein," a device that no longer exists, but which scares me to this day because of the impression its description made upon me as a child. It was a type of rein that forced the horse to keep his head up extremely high at an unnatural angle, the more to look "elegant." The pain that this rein inflicts upon Beauty is heartbreaking, and it did indeed break my heart to read it.
Along the way, Beauty meets other horses, and keeps a lifelong friend, Ginger, who also suffers. Everything comes out alright in the end, in a story that is so tender and yet meaningful at the same time, that it is a shame it is relegated by reputation to the backwaters of so-called "children's literature." It was pure muckracking, in the style of the great American muckrakers who came shortly thereafter. Will a child realize this? It's hard to know, but I know that as a child I was simply haunted by the described cruelty to this horse. And of course heartened by the ending. But I have to say that, many decades later, some of the cruelty in this book still upsets me.
Therefore, I recommend the book with a caveat: If you have a particularly sensitive or thoughtful child, please warn him or her that Black Beauty is mistreated in the story, but that because of the book, and others like it, such mistreatment of animals no longer exists. And then let your child enjoy the sheer wealth of detail in what really is, in the end, a beautiful story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black Beauty has became a Timeless Classic, Jan. 16 2002
By A Customer
"Black Beauty," written by author Anna Sewell, is one of the most famous horse books during the nineteenth century. Part of its achievement consists that the novel is a classic for people with many different characteristics. First published in 1877, "Black Beauty" continues to enjoy people for new generations of American citizens around the world. Anna Sewell's brilliant account of animal treatment became a historic breakthrough because it was the first book that described a horse's experience in England. "An autobiography of a young stallion," this book follows the life of Black Beauty. Throughout the novel, it is told in a creative first person form, as if Beauty was describing and narrating his life. Ms. Sewell chose to write this book from the "horses point of view," and she remarkably was able to succeed with her novel. Since Sewell intended on writing this novel in Beauty's point of view, the reader begins to understand the impact of good and treatment towards the horse and his loyal friends. Starter of the Humane Society, the author truly captivates readers with this autobiography of a beautiful, friendly, loving black stallion. In a letter to her friend, Sewell expresses that she hopes "Black Beauty will induce kindness, sympathy, and understanding treatment towards horses." From Beauty's happy, enjoyable youth to his pleasant retirement, Anna Sewell ingeniously wrote the book to remind the cruel treatment in the 1800's. Most importantly, Sewell wrote the book in a time where horses were not given the same respect today, and "Black Beauty" helped to open the eyes of many to the cruelty horses had to suffer. Although Anna Sewell's classic paints a clear picture of the society in London, England, its message is universal and timeless: animals will serve humans well if they are treated with consideration and kindness.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black Beauty i s a Timeless Classic, Jan. 16 2002
By A Customer
"Black Beauty," written by author Anna Sewell, is one of the most famous horse books during the nineteenth century. Part of its achievement consists that the novel is a classic for people with many different characteristics. First published in 1877, "Black Beauty" continues to enjoy people for new generations of American citizens around the world. Anna Sewell's brilliant account of animal treatment became a historic breakthrough because it was the first book that described a horse's experience in England. "An autobiography of a young stallion," this book follows the life of Black Beauty. Throughout the novel, it is told in a creative first person form, as if Beauty was describing and narrating his life. Ms. Sewell chose to write this book from the "horses point of view," and she remarkably was able to succeed with her novel. Since Sewell intended on writing this novel in Beauty's point of view, the reader begins to understand the impact of good and treatment towards the horse and his loyal friends. Starter of the Humane Society, the author truly captivates readers with this autobiography of a beautiful, friendly, loving black stallion. In a letter to her friend, Sewell expresses that she hopes "Black Beauty will induce kindness, sympathy, and understanding treatment towards horses." From Beauty's happy, enjoyable youth to his pleasant retirement, Anna Sewell ingeniously wrote the book to remind the cruel treatment in the 1800's. Most importantly, Sewell wrote the book in a time where horses were not given the same respect today, and "Black Beauty" helped to open the eyes of many to the cruelty horses had to suffer. Although Anna Sewell's classic paints a clear picture of the society in London, England, its message is universal and timeless: animals were serve humans well if they are treated with consideration and kindness.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black Beauty, Dec 15 2003
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'' I have never forgotten my mother's advice; I knew she was a wise old horse, and our master thought a great deal of her. Her name was Duchess, but he often called her pet.''
So begins the story of Black Beauty. A young, handsome horse Black Beauty gets his name from his dark color and the one white star on his forehead. His journey starts on a plantation with his loving mother, Duchess and kind owner. At first Black Beauty is a colt spending his lazy days in the pasture sleeping by the shade of trees and munching on grass, but as Black Beauty gets older and he gets sold for the first time leaving his mother and old friends behind he begins on a journey filed with adventure, friendships, and hardships.
Black Beauty is a wonderful classic fit for any age. this book is filled with great writing and loveable characters. You won't ever want to put it down. I know I didn't.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You've Got To Read This!, Jan. 5 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Black Beauty (Hardcover)
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell is a nonfiction and adventurous story told by a horse named Black Beauty. Black Beauty is a black stallion that gets sold to many people and has adventures at any place he goes. At his first home he is living peacefully with his mother,brothers,and sisters until he is forced to be sold to John Manly. Right after changing to his second home his life changes as he gets sold to many other people. As he moves from home to home he makes friends with other horses. Ginger, a ginger colered mare that snaps her teeth alot is Black Beauty's old friend. Black Beauty lives with many people. Cruel or kind, he atleast wants someone to love him. This book will show you how a life is being a horse. This story is fun with many horses. I would recommend this book because it is exciting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You've Got To Read This!, Jan. 5 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Black Beauty (Hardcover)
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell is a nonfiction and adventurous story told by a horse named Black Beauty. Black Beauty is a black stallion that gets sold to many people and has adventures at any place he goes. At his first home he is living peacefully with his mother,brothers,and sisters until he is forced to be sold to John Manly. Right after changing to his second home his life changes as he gets sold to many other people. As he moves from home to home he makes friends with other horses. Ginger, a ginger colered mare that snaps her teeth alot is Black Beauty's old friend. Black Beauty lives with many people. Cruel or kind, he atleast wants someone to love him. This book will show you how a life is being a horse. This story is fun with many horses. I would recommend this book because it is exciting.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent unabridged, illustrated version, May 1 2010
By 
P.D. (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
I have chosen the Whole Story version of the classics, as it is loaded with colour illustrations on each page which help keep the story captivating for the whole family (including younger children who are so visual). The illustrations are not cartoon or elementary, they are excellent quality. The version is also unabridged so you don't loose the beauty and true essence the author originally intended. A wonderful way to introduce the whole family to the classics, while also attracting the young ones. So far I have the following Whole Story classics: The Jungle Book, Black Beauty and Heidi. All are excellent for my younger children: 8, 5 and 3.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black Beauty, July 24 2010
This review is from: Black Beauty (Hardcover)
One of the best known books, almost everyone has heard of Black Beauty. The story is told from Black Beauty's point of view giving a totally different view of the world. He has to endure some cruel owners but remains hopeful that someday things will turn out better. One of the sad parts is the death of his over-worked friend 'Ginger'.

The hero horse is eventually saved by a kind boy and his grandfather who care for him and restore him to health. It is quite sad in part but does have a happy ending and in its day would have had an effect on the treatment suffered by working horses.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most beloved horse story of all time., June 17 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Black Beauty (Hardcover)
This particular edition of Black Beauty is beautifully illustrated with old English style color plates. The illustration of the "fire" chapter is interesting in that it depicts the fire engine horses instead of the usual stabled horses trying to escape. I read Black Beauty as a child some 35 years ago. I still have that volume and have collected 16 more.Many low cost editions are without illustrations.... so a book with illustations as these is a must. by Claire
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love of horses for this book as a gem!!!, July 15 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Black Beauty (Library Binding)
I love Black Beauty (Great Illustrated Classics) & I love Black Beauty & horses & the color black
I will sometime get the new Black Beauty book Illustrated by Tom LaPadula...
This book is adapted by Deidre S. Laiken & the cover illustration is by Rick Whipple...
Black Beauty could be a black quarter horse with a white star & a white foot.
In Chapter 15. called "Our New Home", there is a picture on page 127 & the picture is John says Good-bye. John Manly is saying goodbye to Black Beauty & Ginger. John Manly goes around to Black Beauty & Ginger in a soft loving voice. Then John sounded very sad because he would miss Black Beauty & Ginger & it reminds me of Darryl Worley's song called "I miss my friend" & it makes me sad because it is probably about missing a friend. It could be on vacation & it could be other places.
Black Beauty holds his face close to John, & was the only way he could say good-bye. Before when Mr. Manly was gone, Black Beauty never saw him again.
My favorite chapter is called "My Last Home" because Joe Green & Black Beauty are home again together at Farmer Thoroughgood's place...
Black Beauty tells the story of his life & Black Beauty would be a roping horse, rodeo performer & more stuff.
If Black Beauty was at a fight & they burned down the barn in the chapter the fire, the would take the horses out of the barn & the other 2 would be dead & Black Beauty & Ginger are still alive & not killed in the fire.
They people would fight outside the barn & land in the water where the horses drink & get all wet.
I loved this book full of joy!!!
I loved it!!!
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Black Beauty
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell (Hardcover - Sept. 8 2011)
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